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Full text of "S.F. News Letter (Jan.-June 1894)"

5007 028 77 3b 5 

California Stale Library 



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**rt e« p«r Copy, IO C»nt* 



Annual Subscription, J4.00. 







Newsletter 






Vol. ILVUl 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1894. 




■? > Number 1. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred 
Marriott. 600-609-613 Merchant Street. San Francisco. En- 
tered at San Francisco Post-ffice as Secottd Class Matter. 



The office of the News Letter in New York City is at the ■• Evening 
Post" Building, 204-2 n »J Broadway, Room I, where information 
may be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 



ANKNT the new deal at the Southern Pacific office, it may not 
be amiss to observe that notwithstanding the many hands, 
there will be very few passes. 



KATE FIELD thinks that the polygamous Mormon will flour- 
ish in Utah if that territory is admitted to statehood while 
polygamy is only in a state of suspension. Kate is wise, and has 
little or no confidence in Mormon professions of reform. 



THERE is an opinion prevalent in Florida that the Governor of 
that State is right in his efforts to stop the Corbett-Mitchell 
fight. But there wilt be millions of disappointed people in this 
country if Mitchell be allowed to take his tireless jaw back to 
the other side without fir3t having bad it well jarred. 



CRIED Governor Mitchell, "No fightin* here; 
Go home an' put up your tongues;" 
Bat Mitchell th' t'other — him noted for lungs — 
An' Pompadour Jim, which never knowd fear, 
They jus' kep' on figbtin', in spite of the law, 
Till neither bad left a tongue or a jaw. 



THE steamer Bawnmore, which is now being fitted with tanks 
for the Peruvian oil trade, is dow some years old, and has 
weathered many storms, but the irrepressible water-front man of 
the peerless Examiner gave out to the world on Monday last that 
she would be formally launched from the Union Iron Works on 
January 10, 189-4. 

A PHILOSOPHICAL writer has just published a treatise ex- 
plaining how to fall in love. He has wasted his time and 
his book is worthless. With the American girl a graduate at six- 
teen, and the American young man in the poetry business at 
eighteen, he would have been much better rewarded had he 
written a treatise explaining how not to fall in love. 



THE partial opening of the Midwinter Fair raises the question 
as to whether or not, and when, the managers propose to in- 
corporate the affair. It has been expected all along that this 
would be done, and in the absence of any explanation of the de- 
lay, the public is becoming inquisitive — later it may be inquisi- 
torial. Much money will yet be required. Incorporation and the 
issuance of stock might produce it. 



GOVERNOR WAITE proposes to set up a financial system of 
his own in Colorado, provided the Legislature, in special ses- 
sion, carry out his wishes. His State will have more silver, then, 
than it can store, and will prove a happy object lesson to those 
who think that one State can prosper by circulating a sixty-cent 
dollar while all other nations refuse to coin it or recognize it as 
equal to its face value. If Governor Waite could make money 
out of wheels he would have a fortune in his head. 



PEOPLE are complaining that the young women at the deliv- 
ery windows of the General Postoffice are far from obliging, 
and appear offended at people for having letters addressed to 
that office. A correspondent has sent us an envelope addressed 
to him at the Postoffice, the surface of which is covered with 
*« Have your letters addressed to street and number." He writes 
that the young lady appeared very much annoyed at his presum- 
ing to ask her to look for his letter, inquiring several times why 
he did not have his letters addressed to bis residence, and that 
on finding his letter, before delivering it, she kept a string of 
people waiting while she viciously stamped the letter with the 
above notice in several places. The young ladies who are em- 
ployed at the delivery window should know that tbey are there 
for the accommodation of the public, who pay them, and who 
have quite as much right to expect the same attention and civ- 
ility from the employees of the Postoffice as they receive from 
the clerks of any shop, store or business office in the city. 



THE Chronicle's expose of the crookedness of J N. E. Wilson in 
the West case is not a surprise to those who have observed 
the conduct of this overreaching lawyer-politician in the past. 
Mr. Bert, to his credit, has dissolved his law partnership with 
Mr. Wilson in time to save his own reputation. It is charged by 
Dr. West (and there is strong collateral evidence to support hiru) 
that Wilson betrayed his trust by rifling West's box at the Safe 
Deposit, and there are other ugly charges against him in the con- 
duct of this case. 



AGAIN Europe stands face to face with a war which she has 
been going to fight every other month during the past twenty 
years. If the opposing powers have any idea of cutting loose in 
the near future, they could not please this country better than by 
unmuzzling the dogs of war at once. We can furnish them with 
food, clothing and other essentials at an unusually low rate, and 
with quick dispatch. If Europe would only have the big wind- 
up that seems inevitable, international arbitration could be a 
good deal more easily brought about. 

UNTO the Fresno officers this song 
Is snug, this joyous, proud and grateful strain 
Is strained; for though the plans went somewhat wrong, 

And that man Evans caused them grievous pain 
By leaving jail without a by-your-leave 

(Although, thank God, he left the jail behind), 
Yet did tbey not unduly weep and grieve? 
And, with a valor hard indeed to find, 
They captured Mrs. Evans! 

FROM what is deemed an authoritative source, a rumor comes 
announcing the retiring of R. P. Scbwerin as resident "Vice- 
President of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company and the restora- 
tion of Alexander Center to the local management of the Com- 
pany's affairs. Lieutenant Schwerin's health has broken down 
from overwork. He will likely retain his position as Purchas- 
ing Agent of the Southern Pacific Company. Mr. Center's abil- 
i'y has been a conspicuous element for many years in the suc- 
cessful business of the Pacific Mail, first at Panama and then at 
Yokohama. He has been in the company's service for the last 
three years at this port, and it is believed that bis large capabili- 
ties will prove of great value in the position of manager. 



LAST week the News Letter called the attention of the Super- 
intendent of Streets to the gross negligence of the Ferries and 
Cliff House cable system in the matter of keeping in proper order 
that part of the streets traversed by their lines which the terms 
of their franchise require them to maintain. These streets are not 
only injurious to the property in the.districts which they traverse, 
but are a menace to the safety of buggy drivers as well. In 
hardly any of the east-and-west streets occupied by the company's 
tracks is there any attempt to comply with the law requiring the 
company to pave for a distance of two feet on either side of the 
track, and the condition of the bituminous rock pavement be- 
tween the rails is grossly neglected and full of dangerous holes. 
Does the Superintendent of Streets desire that his attention 
should again be called to this important matter? 



TWO matters of convenience at Golden Gate Park, with refer- 
ence to the Midwinter Fair, demand immediate attention. 
The first is the necessity for a bridge over the driveway which 
passes between the Fair Grounds and the principal, or D-street, 
entrance to the grounds. The Geary, McAllister, Powell and new 
Sacramento street lines, with their vast system of transfers from 
other heavily traveled lines, will carry the bulk of the street-car 
traffic to the Fair, and these passengers have to cross the main 
driveway of the park. This creates a danger which is likely to 
produce great damage as well as inconvenience. A bridge of 
ample width over the driveway would secure safety and is an 
urgent necessity. The second need is the extension of a drive- 
way around the southern end of the Fair enclosure. The fence 
has cut the south driveway in two, and hence drivers must go 
all the way arouDd the Fair Grounds by way of the north drive 
in order to approach Strawberry Hill and the beach. Some of the 
time of the five hundred men who have been employed to work 
in the park might well be used in constructing the needed drive 
around the southern end of the grounds. 



SAN FKANCISCO 



NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 6, 1894; 



TRAFFIC PROBLEMS. 



MEETING OF THE WOOL MEN. 



THE very general bankruptcy of railroads now being witnessed 
all over the country is well calculated to serve as a wet 
blanket on the agitations that occasionally arise for lower fares 
and freights. If existing tariffs do not enable the roads to earn 
operating expenses and interest on capital, it is clear that those 
tariffs, instead of being too high, are ruinously low. It is perhaps 
a realizing sense of that fact on the part of our business men gen- 
ally that is killing the Traffic Association of this State, for it is 
palpably unequal to the struggle it has been for some time main 
taining. When Manager Leeds began his campaign of education 
in regard to traffic management he never tired of pointing to the 
popular movement in Kansas for lower fares and freights. The 
natural corollary of his then argument was that California should 
take a note of Kansas and go and do likewise. To that end be 
endeavored to take the question of railroad charges into the arena 
of politics, and even now he hopes, it is said, to make the ques- 
tion an issue at the State election in November next. Meanwhile 
it is worthy of note that the Kansas Populists are not now as 
certain as tbey were that cinching existing railroads is the right 
thing to do. They are casting around for newer remedies. They 
find that their location as an extreme Western State is against 
them. It is a long way to the Atlantic sea-board. It is the same 
trouble as that which afflicts our own farmers. Part of Kansas 
is near to water communication, whilst a much larger part is a 
long way from it. It is a situation that exists to some extent in 
California. To' meet these conditions, the Kansas politicians now 
declare that the State must supply transportation facilities that 
will put all parties on an equal fooling. 

Farmers distant from competing points must be put in as 
good a position as farmers contiguous to them. Mountains must 
be leveled, rivers bridged and space annihilated if need be, in 
order that tbe wheat grower of the far West shall be brought as 
near to the markets of Europe as is his brother on the Atlantic 
border. At Erst it was proposed to accomplish these and other 
desirable results by legislation. But Peffer has proved a failure, 
and even Mrs. Lease is in despair at the divisions and confusion 
of sounds among her associates. Lewelling, having been elected 
Governor, is still in the place of power, and proposes to see what 
he can do. His plans on paper read as if tbey might have been 
written by our own good Mr. Leeds. Tbe Governor has concluded 
a contract for a line of steamers to take the crops of Kansas 
directly to European ports. For the present these steamers will 
not enter " the heart of Kansas," wherever that may be, but will 
stop at Galveston. The problem still remains as to how to get 
the crops to that tidal point. As the railroads which now con- 
nect Kansas farms with Galveston wickedly charge freight rates, 
the Governor has given his whole mind to determining how those 
crops can escape railroad charges. He proposes to build with 
State funds a new line across Dakota to the Gulf, which is to haul 
the Kansas crops to tidewater for next to nothing, and this 
scheme, he claims, has the support of a majority of the Legisla. 
ture. Yet he admits that it is only a temporary measure. A 
more lasting device will be the building of a canal that will ena- 
ble the steamers to land in the middle of the State. By the time 
this is done he thinks money will be made plentiful and cheap by 
the issue of legal tender notes, secured by Sub-Treasury deposits 
of corn, on the cob. That is the trend which traffic problems are 
now taking in Kansas, and ihe end is not yet. It will come some 
day, and by that time it will be realized that the right use of 
railroads does not consist in driving them into bankruptcy. 

AN EXPERIMENT WITH MARINES. 

A FEW weeks ago the News Letter was enabled to state, upon 
official authority, that, owing to the desertion of men, orders 
had been issued by the commanding officer of the British squad- 
ron in Pacific waters, that in future San Francisco should not be 
a port of call. The instructions were that the ships were to coal 
at Monterey or down the coast, where convenient, on the way 
between stations. This order included the Royal Arthur, the new 
flagship, and one of the most modern types of naval architecture. 
The information created considerable comment among the British 
residents of the city, who objected to being deprived of a chance 
to see the pride of the fleet, wbicb was daily expected to arrive. 
An inquiry was started, which finally got tbe length of the Ad- 
miralty, who naturally denied having issued any order of the 
kind. Nor did they, as it happens to be out of their province. 
Nevertheless, the Royal Arthur did not touch here, but after com- 
pleting her coaling at Port Angeles, sailed on a cruise. Not long af- 
ter, H.M.S. Nymph arrived, but with an object in view, which has 
hitherto not been made public. Being desirous of allowing the 
vessels on the station to visit this port during the Midwinter Fair, 
It was finally determined to send the Nymph down on trial, to 
see how tbe men would behave If granted full liberty. Shore 
leave was given to the crew the minute she arrived, in port, and 
only the ordinary restrictions of the service was placed upon 
Jack. However, not a single man deserted, so that it is now 
more than likely that during the next six months the white en- 
sign will float in the harbor, not only over the Royal Arthur, but 
also over as many of the other ships on the station as can get 
here in time to join in the prevailing festivities. 



THE wool-growers are to meet in this city next week to devise 
measures having for their purpose tbe defeat of tbe Wilson 
tariff. They want the present exorbitant duty on imported 
wool retained. It will be curious to watch tbeir proceedings and 
investigate the arguments by which they will attempt to sustain 
their pet scheme. The obligation will be upon them to show 
why, for their benefit, the general community should be com- 
pelled to buy inferior woolen clothes at double prices. The 
official figures show that during the last fiscal year the United 
States imported woolens, the invoice value of which was (drop- 
ping the odd figures) $35,000,000, and upon these were collected 
du'ies to the amount of $34,000,000. It is very certain, there- 
fore, tba> the ultimate purchaser had to pay more than one hun- 
dred per cent advance upon the original value of the article, be- 
cause the Importer would collect interest and profit upon the sum 
paid the Government as a tax, as well as upon the price paid tbe 
foreign producer. Verily, it was a monstrous and intolerable im- 
position upon Aniercao clothes-wearers, to whom warm wooleni 
are a necessity of life. And right here comes in a conclusive 
answer to the absurd contention that the tariff is not a tax upon 
the local consumer and that the foreigner bears the burden of the 
duties. In the name of common sense how could he afford to 
pay $34 000 000 as duties on stuff for which he received altogether 
only $35,000,000? Then, again, how comes it, if the foreigner 
pays the duty, that woolens in our stores are almost invariably 
marked at 150 par cent advance upon tbe price at which the same 
class of goods can be bought at the point of production? Tbe 
idea that the local purchaser of those woolens does not pay the 
tariff tax is so manifestly ridiculous that an apology is due to 
the intelligent reader for deeming it necessary to answer it. Yet 
partisan dailies, like Ihe Call, keep on reiterating it as a truism 
that admits of no dispute. If it were as true as is claimed, it 
would be necessary only to fix the tariff at the value of the 
goods, and in that case the importer would be parting with them 
for nothing; in which case the government could afford to give 
us all a bounty of 50 per cent for consenting to wear clothes, and 
make a profit of another 50 per cent by its enterprise. All this, 
be it remembered, at the expense of the ever-gra-ping and never 
benevolent foreign importer! It will be in order for our wool 
men to tell us what need they have for this tariff tax, and what 
good it does them. Soon after the McKinley tariff became a law, 
tbe class of wool they produce fell to lower figures than ever be- 
fore in the history of the country. At the same time the im- 
portation of fine wools fell off. The two events bore the relation 
towards each other of cause and effect. The tariff prevented the 
importation of fine wools necessary to mix with our coarse ones 
in order to render the tioished product marketable. It is true in 
regard to California wools that free trade is the best of protection; 
a fact which our mill owners say has been, during the last twelve 
months, more clearly demonstrated than ever before. We predict 
the happening of these two things: that the Wilson tariff will 
pass and that our wool growers will receive a better price for their 
next crop than they did for their last two. 

THE LATEST TRADE BALANCE. 



PEOPLE who want to see money plentiful once again, and who 
comprehend the nature of cause and effect, will derive pleasure 
from a study of the monthly balance sheets of our country's for- 
eign trade. They are now telling a very agreeable and satisfying 
story. For tbe first six months of the present year they were 
largely against us, and it was not until August that the tide began 
to turn. Our country has always so much to sell of what Europe 
needs that we can soon turn the trade balances in our favor when 
our people are that way minded. They started to limit their 
purchases and increase their sales when the money panic began 
to be felt in July. The results of the following four months end- 
ing with November are before us. In August, when the change 
first began to be felt, our exports exceeded our imports by only 
$2 700.000, but the diffeience has kept on growing with each suc- 
ceeding month at an astonishing ratio. In September it amounted 
to $11,700;000; in October to $26 300.000, and in November it had 
swollen to $41,384,757. In other words, during the four months 
named we sold more than we bought to the extent of $92 000,000. 
During the previous seven months the balance was $36,000,000 
the other way. In consequence of this unfavorable balance and 
the sale of American securities abroad, we parted with golJ and 
silver for a time at a rate that alarmed conservative men and 
broueht on the, money stringency. We had parted with $77,- 
000,000 in gold and with $39,000,000 in silver when the tide 
turned. Since then we have drawn back to these shores $72,000,- 
000 in gold and $17,500,000 in silver. There is no mistaking the 
meaning and effect of those figures. Extreme timidity always 
follows money panics, and, in consequence, it may be some time 
before trade resumes its normal conditions, but the final result is 
in no manner of doubt. With an ever increasing balance on the 
right side of the ledger, and with much money flowing in and 
little or none going out, it cannot be long before there is pros- 
perity, wide-spread and general, throughout our land. Tbe lesson 
of the last half year has, however, been too severe to be soon for- 
gotten, and, in the end, it will be useful on that very account. 



' 



SAN PR INCI8C0 NEWS 



THE DANOEKUtS liARKOUK 



A MAWKISH SENTIMENT. 



TBI nr»*pii'fr« which »• : the daily press of San 

PraocUeo for publishing thrnrv lc are 

■ oihinfc le«s than making the 
the *T*rri>[ ( T«. The daih the I rut it bo seldom that 

; wuh thanks- 

»nd prayer. I b must 

t«e un*- t is unjust and 

dangerous, a? in Lbs . For in no way have they ruis* 

• uieil the danger which si rerj home and every good 
citizen in town: rod i danger ia to aid its 
operation. U Is well fori that ihey may not, without 

■ night, and Hum at any time 
after sundown they may i»e robbed on the street. It ia deplorable t<> 

• that much of the highway robbery is done by DO 
hands, for lata means thai men uuai i ustomed to crime regard them- 

a* forced by- ceit. Hut burglaries, purse- 

snatching and the taking of diamonds from women's ears are com- 
mon enough, and herein we see the handiwork of dangerous experts. 
The feminine nature is ao ordered that it rarely is competent to re- 
ft the presence ol danger, and hence women often display a 
courage which makes men ashamed, A woman is likely to be more 
foolhardy than a man; she will run greater risks with the safety of 
her person and property, because nature, for reasons which need not 
here be explored, has denied her the gift of a reasonable caution 
which belongs to men and which is essential to that higher form of 
ge which places the value of life above that of property. It is 
this lack that causes her to carry her purse in hand, to wear valuable 
sealskin on her back and diamonds in her ears in streets where foot- 
pads may assault her, and atjthe peril of her life to resist a robber 
who stops her. As. however, it has not been given to men to invest 
women with attributes which the Almighty has denied them, it re- 
mains only to interpose such checks to the footpad menace as the in- 
genuity of organized society can invent. The woman who wears 
pendant diamonds in her ears will suffer no more than a tearing open 
of the lobes when the thief snatches her gems, and any surgeon can 
close the wound without leaving a conspicuous scar. It is those 
women who wear screw diamonds that will suffer, for in their case 
ihe robber rau-t sever the ear-lobes with a keen knife, and then 
the skill of the surgeon fails— he cannot make new ears. Those of us 
who do not fancy our wives, sisters and sweethearts going about 
with only half-ears (the main evil of which lies in Ihe inability to 
wear ear-diamonds again) are particularly interested in the solution 
of the footpad problem. Police Chief Crowley says that we cannot 
flog garroters in the absence of a State law, but thinks that solitary 
confinement would accomplish a happy result. Until some efficient 
restraining measures shall have been adopted it is well for every citi- 
zen to understand that he is in peril and that he cannot go amiss if 
he kill a footpad now and then. 



THE SAVINGS BANKS TO RESUME. 



IT is understood that our local savings banks are about to resume 
lending. It is not one moment too soon. It is now six months 
since they went upon a strike. About the first of July last they, 
in effect, put up their shutters and refused to operate. It was their 
way of meeting the money stringency. An exceedingly poor wa} r , we 
think it was. Whilst taking in all the money they could lay hands 
upon, they concluded not to lend any out. They refused to advance 
money on even United States bonds. According to the somewhat 
exaggerated expression of one cashier, "they would not make ad- 
vances on twenty dollar pieces." Tnis, despite the fact that it is their 
special business to put out money to interest-earning. When the 
security is unquestionable and the interest satisfactory, it is due to 
depositors and borrowers alike that the ordinary course of business 
should not be interfered with. There was no necessary reason why 
the Eastern money stringency should have had the effect it did upon 
our savings banks. The fear of payments in silver could not have 
existed on this Coast, for all our contracts are payable in gold. The 
bank vaults were full of money at the time. Indeed, they had not 
had so much spare cash in them for many years. The way to bring 
ou a panic and to intensify it when it was on was to do just what was 
done. The crowd, in a fit of unreason, may be pardoned for hoard- 
ing gold and hiding it out of sight, but financial leaders ought to 
know that idleness is the worst use to which money can be put— if it 
can be rightly called a use. It is well that so unfortunate a state of 
affairs is at last to end. The making of loans in the usual way is to 
be resumed. The effect upon general business cannot fail to be soon 
apparent. If it should turn out, as many good judges think it will, 
that the savings banks will have more money than they can find safe 
investment for in the city, they would do well to extend a helping 
hand to the country. 



THE London Telegraph says that Americans lack reverence for 
one another. If the Telegraph bad ever seen a host of cod- 
fish Americans down on their shoddy knees before some pin- 
headed scion of British aristocracy it would understand that 
reverence is not so much needed as is a strap. It is that sort of 
thing that nips reverence i' the bud. 



IT has been repeatedly said that n< the popu- 

lar MMitinn ni of the age in n blch they are published . that they 
or* a* ' inprtnving the great army of humanity, rarely 

in its van and ■ rarely in its rear. If Ibis be 

true— and It doubtless thecourseof the California papers in 
regard t.» the escape ol Chris Evans must be counted an exception 
to i he rule. They have inculcated no mawkish Bentl mentality 
f.>r the desperate bandit, but hove been almost a unit in condem- 
nation of (he gross olMcial negligence which permitted his escape, 
as an expression of Ihe hope that he may be captured and duly 
punished for his crimen. If there be anything in the old theory 
that murderers should 1 e punished— and who will gainsay it? — 
the papers are certainly right, yet they are just as certainly in 
the van of popular sentiment in the commonwealth where they 
are published. It is astonishing — this popular sentiment which 
exists in favor of the escaped felon. Nor is the sentiment con- 
fined to the class which naturally sympathizes with the depraved. 
It is not alone Bill Sykes and his ilk who are heard to express 
the hope that Evans may escape, but men of intelligence and 
good living unite in the expression of a similar desire; persons 
whose lives are as spotless as those of humankind are likely to 
astonish the listener by expressing the wish that a triple mur- 
derer, whose trail for months was one of blood, may escape the 
legal penalty which he so fully has deserved; no small fraction of 
the people seem willing to appear as condoners of' homicide. Of 
course the cause of this sympathy is not hard to find ; it is merely 
the admiration of man, the animal, for brute force, pluck and 
courage. It is precisely the same sentiment that sometimes im- 
pelled the Roman populace to decree that the gladiator who 
fought a brave, if losing, battle should live. The California public 
has reversed its thumbs for mercy in Chris Evans' behalf because 
it approves the man's courage. Yet we say that in this matter 
the journals of the State are in the van of the too prevalent popu- 
lar sentiment. Evans is undoubtedly brave, but he is not the 
less a murderer. A mad dog knows no such sentiment as fear, 
but to refuse to shoot him to death on that account would be a 
mark of insanity or imbecility. Because the Visalia bandit has 
unlimited courage, he has been so much the more a scourge of 
society. The papers are right: this sentiment in favor of Evans 
is mawkish, maudlin, or worse. 



GUARD THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



THAT was an astounding document that turned up at and 
was turned out of the Pacific Bank the other day. It has 
been said that it ought not to have been " given away." But it 
is always in order, and in honor, to expose conspiracies against the 
public weal. No such agreement had a right to be there, or any- 
where else, for the matter of that. It waB eminently proper to 
hand it over to the Grand Jury for investigation. It may be that no 
indictable offense tan be fastened upon anybody, but that should 
not prevent all the facts from being brought to light. What 
was the consideration given for the signatures appended to that 
contract, and how came it into the strong-box in which it was 
found? It is surprising that men with heads upon their shoul- 
ders could have been induced to put their names to such a humil- 
iating bond upon any terms. That they now plead the baby act 
and preteud that they did not know what they were signing, was 
perhaps to be expected, because it wasthe only defense open to 
them, but it is a miserable, beggarly defense, all the same. It is 
well for the public schools that only one of their number was 
elected, and he ought to resign forthwith. A man who could 
sign such an abominable Declaration of Dependence is too desti 
tute of moral sense to be permitted longer to act as a director of 
the education of our future citizens. When will bosses and aspir- 
ing politicians learn that tbey must keep their hands off the pub- 
lic schools? It does not pay them to attract unfavorably the 
attention of the 800 teachers and 30,000 children who are ever 
alert to anythiog calculated to affect the schools injuriously. 
Nothing that Buckley ever did brought him so speedy punish- 
ment as bis placing of favorites in the School Department. He 
could loot the treasury and defy the press, but as soon as he began 
to lay unclean hands upon the schools his days were numbered. 



WT. STEAD, the London editor, who in an address in Chi- 
. cago compared the women who sell their bodies with the 
ones who, blessed with wealth and opportunity, do nothing to 
benefit suffering humanity, to the disadvantage of the latter, 
scandalized society, of course; but some people will think that 
he struck somewhere near the heart of eternal truth. If Madame 
de Blublud will not help that Smith woman, and the latter is 
■driven to a choice between starvation and the old, sad traffic in 
herself, will the Lord hold Madame de Blublud guiltless, think 
you? Perbaps — stranger things might happen — when the two 
lives are weighed in the great scales of infinite knowledge and 
sympathy, it may be found that a polluted body is a less crime 
against God and humanity than is a calloused soul — who knows? 
Let society be scandalized by Editor Stead's utterance if it will, 
but may it also give some honest consideration to what he says. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan . 6, 1894. 



FIRESIDE 



SUPERSTITIONS AND 
LORE. 



OLD-TIME FOLK 



ALTHOUGH witchcraft may be regarded as completely extinct 
in tbe present day, .yet tbere are still many superstitious 
people wbo implicitly believe in certain omens, and have strong 
faith in the folk-lore of by-gone generations. Between Christmas 
aDd Twelfth Night is a very favorite time for country people to 
indulge in these singular fancies, and as many of these auguries 
relate to tbe great mystery that surrounds death, timid women 
and credulous men draw closer together round the fireside at tbe 
howling of a dog, which is regarded as the precursor of a death in 
the family. In like manner, a mouse squeaking behind the bed 
of a sick person is supposed to be a warning of death, and the 
breaking of a cow into the garden is a warning that within six 
months some member of the family will die. Tbe ominous tick- 
ing of the insect named the "death-watch " is also another infalli- 
ble sign of death. 

Faith in these omens is ao strong that tbere are many instances 
on record where death has actually followed the event— in most 
cases being, of course, a mere coincidence— but in others death is 
often accelerated by tbe superstitious credulity of the invalid, 
the entrance of a bird or bumble-bee into a sick room being espe- 
cially regarded as a harbinger of approaching decease. To cut 
one's nails on a Sunday is to have the devil with one all the 
week. The breaking of a looking glass is a sure omen of 
coming trouble for seven years. To kill a cricket or to turn a 
feather bed on Sunday is surely productive of evil results. To 
see tbe new moon for the first time through glass is notoriously 
unlucky, but one may counteract the ill effects by turning over 
tbe money (if we have any) in our pockets. To sit down thirteen 
at a meal is a sure indication that one of the party will die before 
the year is out. To walk beneath a ladder is to Invite calamity, 
but in that case it does not appear clear what the particular 
calamity may be— it may mean a fractured skull or a broken 
limb, or the injury may be confined to receiving a drop of paint 
or water upon tbe coat or bonnet. That sudden shiver or shud- 
der that we are all so familiar with is a sign that some vagrant 
goose is walking over one's grave. This omen should be reassur- 
ing to sailors, as it indicates that they will at least be interred 
comfortably on dry land. The striking of a church clock while 
the minister is giving out a text was supposed to be an unfailing 
omen of an approaching deaih in the parish, but it is to be borne 
in mind that in large parishes a death is not an infrequent occur- 
rence. 

Omens of coming good luck are as many and varied as are 
those of misfortune, one of the cbief being that tbe seeing of a 
dead donkey will be followed by some singular good fortune; but 
unfortunately a dead donkey is seldom or never seen. Do don- 
keys ever die? We never had the luck to behold a defunct 
member of the assinine family, neither did Sam Weller, if Charles 
Dickens is to be believed. It is still a universal belief tbat 
crickets bring good luck to a house, and tbat if a spider be found 
on anybody's clothes, the lucky fiuder will receive money unex- 
pectedly. 

There are many old superstitions connected with the itching of 
certain parts of tbe body; for instance, if the left palm itches, 
money has to be paid away, but if the sensation be confined to 
the right hand, money will be received. If the sole of tbe foot 
itches, we are shortly to walk over strange ground; if the knee, 
our next devotions will be in some new church or meeting house; 
and if the irritation be felt in the elbow, we are to share our bed 
with some stranger. Tingling in the right ear indicates that some 
one is praising, but if the sensatiou be felt in the left aural 
appendage, it signifies that the owner is being vilified. The 
burning of the cheek or itching of the point of the nose possesses 
similar significations. To have one's teeth set wide apart is a 
sure indication of good luck, as is also the meeting of a piebald 
horse, or the finding of a four-leaved shamrock or the quatrefoil 
clover. Anybody stumbling upstairs is consoled for his broken 
or bruised shin by the thought that it is a recognized sign of 
coming good luck. In short, turfl in whatever direction one 
may, superstitious people were apt to surround the innumerable 
little' occurrences of every day life with mysterious and absurd 
meanings. The trivial circumstance of finding a pin or the pick- 
ing up of a horse-shoe is still considered by many as a lucky 
omen. The superstitions of seamen alone, if detailed at length, 
would fill a volume, but ships now sail on Friday without meet- 
ing the Flying Dutchman or being gobbled up by the great sea 
serpent. No mariner has ever succeeded in making a gale of wind 
by whistling for it. Parsons no longer are believed to bring mis- 
fortune to the vessel on which tbey sail, and rats are no longer to 
be seen landing in regimental order from doomed vessels. 

One ancient superstition may still be used for the consolation 
of desponding bachelors, and maidens who long for aloving heart 
and comfortable home, viz: That if an unmarried person chance 
to sit between a man and his wife at dinner, between Christmas 
and Twelfth day, he or she will certaiuly be married before the 
year is out. H - °- E. 

San Francisco, January, 1894. 



WHY NO SALONS IN SAN FRANCISCO? 



[By Di Verhon.1 

WHY is no salon maintained in San Francisco, where there 
are so many men and women of wealth, and so many mem- 
bers of upper Bohemia? Would it not be both desirable and of 
muiual benefit to bring tbe two classes together? 

Why cannot we have a salon in our city like those that were 
held in France? First, because we are notFrench, but Americans, 
and what is natural to people of their temperament is not pos- 
sible to ours; second, because we are a republic with democracy 
prevailing. Knowing only the aristocracy of wealth, we are not, 
like France, a republic with the social distinctions of an empire. 

Kate Field has given us some pleasant pictures of George 
Eliot's evenings at home. These were frequented by men of in- 
tellect, but save for an occasional American, no woman was seen 
at these gatherings. In some of our older American cities, liter- 
ary women hold receptions which are meant to carry out the 
salon idea, but, as some one has said, "You're likely to meet 
such a job-lot of people. ■' There are so many people, particularly 
women, wbo flock to such receptions, or fasten themselves upon 
those who tbey think ought to give them a lift into the social 
world, that it is sufficient to ruin any attempt at establishing a 
literary or intellectual coterie. 

In San Francisco we have mutual improvement clubs, reading 
classes and Browning classes without number. Some of these are 
composed of ladies honestly endeavoring to increase their stock 
of ideas. Others are working for social advancement, and others 
are snobs, pure and simple, and their associations are as "intel- 
lectual" as their members deem compatible with a high social 
position. These clubs are usually controlled by old women, who 
look with disfavor upon any progressive moves by the younger 
members. Tbey do not want a salon, where youth and beauty 
and wit might be the lance that would unhorse them from the 
steed of their ancient wisdom. The fact is, that many women 
who might shine in a salon develop so early into cranks tbat 
they would spoil any circle into which tbey might force them- 
selves. Tbey ride hobbies, and they ride them to death. 

Why does not a single one of our wealthy society leaders main- 
tain a salon? San Francisco is not sufficiently old as a coram u- 
munity to have established such a permanent foundation as tbat 
would require. Our people move about loo much. They are 
here to day and somewhere else to-morrow. When they come 
back to 8an Francisco they open their long-closed bouses and 
give a ball, and everybody dances, eats and drinks himself back 
iuto a superficial acquaintance with everyone else. Then again, 
8an Francisco societv is more musical than literary. 

Now, the essential feature of the success of a salon must be the 
possibility of its continuance, of its permanent atmosphere. It is 
one tbing to let people amuse themselves back into their superfi- 
cial acquaintance with each other, and quite another to establish 
that spirit of mutual understanding, respect and toleration with- 
out which no salon could long bold together. A certain wealthy 
woman in this city held an informal "salon," as she called it, 
with the quotation marks in her voice, but it was only that she 
might sit on a pedestal while her satellites revolved around and 
burned incense. But some of the satellites got out of their orbits, 
and their incense turned out to be a poor kind of punk, and so she 
gave up the salon idea, and now contents herself with being a 
high and mighty lady patroness of " exclusive" charities. 

Our new rich are responsible for many of tbe fashions now in 
vogue. By their vulgar desire to outdo their neighbors, and to 
dazzle by barbaric display, they have actually driven the modest 
entertainer out of the field. To tbe new ricb that only has value 
which can be seen, touched, tasted, weighed or measured. They 
cannot understand anything that does not bear some relation to 
tbe query, " How much ? " It is not to be supposed that the new 
rich will take stock in what is so impalpable as brains. Besides, 
they do not dare to risk any comparisons, and they want to be 
the first and tbe most noticed; and what would they do with the 
bright spirits of upper Bohemia if they were to bring them to 
their feasts? In all likelihood they would seat them below the 
salt, and before the evening was over whisper, " You can write 
this up for your paper." 

A salon would not be a success without men, and in San Fran- 
cisco men of brains have many pleasant places wherein they can 
meet congenial spirits. They are not over-anxious to aid in estab- 
lishing a salon where any of their time and attention would be de- 
voted to bright women. Bright men are not fond of brilliant 
women. Tbey are afraid of them. 

A salon may yet develop in San Francisco society, but some 
of the conditions which now govern society itself will have to be 
changed, and the mistress of tbe salon must be a woman wbo 
will be able to free herself from all danger of toadyism ; she must 
be a woman of tact and of magnetism, gracious and with powers 
of reparl6e, and the ability to control and blend elements which, 
except for her kindly influence, might become inharmonious. 



THE death of Captain J. C. Ainsworth, the well-known capital- 
ist of Alameda county, is deplored by all wbo knew this 
estimable man and all wbo were aware of his value as a citizen 
and his qualities as a man. 



'.- 



BAN li:\\. [SCO NEWS LETTER. 



AN ART STUDENT IN PARIS 






PARIS, December 0. l - 

THK.KK are no girls at the Julian Acad<-nile. The school .on 
st*ts of foar studios, and is the largest of the lot; three are 
used for drawing and painting, the other for sculpture. We have 
foar models every week. I belong to tbe upstairs class, under 
Benjamin Constant and J. P, Laurens, while downstairs the stu- 
dents have Kieury and Bougereau. The first two have paintings 
at the Louvre and other places. Laurens especially is regarded 
as the best draughtsman living. 

Kvery Monday morning at eight all the mate or female models 
as it happens to be) assemble and strip, and show themselves on 
the platform. Sometimes there are so many that the platform 
cannot accommodate them, and so the line extends beyond, the 
models standing on tbe tops of chairs. Then the mooter, or the 
one who does tbe talking for us. asks us bow many want this or 
that model, until tbe one who receives tbe largest number of 
votes is chosen. In trying to be the successful candidate, they 
try to outdo each other by striking various poses. The unsuc- 
cessful ones clamber down and slowly dress themselves, regard- 
ing tbe victorious model with jealous glances. 

There are so many new students that we are treated to drinks 
nearly every day. Tbe boys started the custom of making all 
newcomers treat, and as there is a large crowd of us it costs the 
poor nouveaux a good deal of money. As soon as a new one 
comes in to draw, the whole crowd yells out, "Nouveau, pay£ ;i 
boire! " and they keep it up till be gives in ; and then, when the 
time comes for the model to rest, we all form a long line, with 
our hands on each other's shoulders, with the nouveau in front, 
and steer for the caft* across the street. We all sing some studio 
song as we go — some of the boys wearing their painting gowns, 
on the backs of which are painted things which would severely 
shock Americans. We pack the model along, too, and as she 
wears very little clothing the effect is highly artistic. There is 
one thing here, however — we work like blazes, and when we fool 
we raise Cain. The boys are particularly frolicksome at rest 
time. As tbe model rests fifteen minutes, it gives us plenty of 
time to play pranks. One of our stock tricks is to "lay" for 
a new fellow who thinks he can paint. He will get a big canvas 
and start a great painting, and when he leaves tbe room the boys 
will get hold of his canvas and make the most outlandish things 
on it imaginable. When the new man returns and sees the de- 
struction of bis work, be sometimes flies into a rage and tells 
Julian. Maybe Julian will come up. They throw things at the 
new man and call him by frightful names. That takes the nou- 
veau down, and if he is still obnoxious they torment him till he 
is very humble. 

I never see any drunken people in Paris, for Parisians don't 
drink like Americans. Very little beer is consumed, and no 
whisky at all. The leading drinks are syrups, grenadine and ab- 
sinthe. You never see "toughs" or free fights here, except in 
time of riots. 

X have changed my restaurant. It is a little place, and we call 
it the "hole in the wall." All the American students eat here. 
Every evening at six we turn up here, and a jolly crowd it is. 
We tell stories, crack jokes and sing in chorus while we eat. 
Marie, the pretty girl who waits on us, cannot understand Eng- 
lish, and hence she is utterly unconscious of the fact that the 
boys call her all kinds of pet names and make violent love to 
her. After supper the crowd breaks up. Some go to the night 
school, others to the club. We have a few female students at the 
evening class, and they have to put up with a great deal, for the 
boys tell risque stories, are rather free with the model occasion- 
ally, and swear a little when they Bpoil a drawing. When we 
have a man posing, the girls have to stand him without a rag, as 
the boys will not have it. 

The instructors here are different from the one in the San Fran- 
cisco Art Association. They criticise everybody's drawing, no 
matter who he is. If the student is a German or an American, 
there is some one to translate the professor's words for him, as 
all tbe instruction is in French. As soon as the instructor en- 
ters the room, everything instantly becomes quiet, and all are 
working away. The professor goes from one to another, and 
tells them what their drawing lacks. No visitors are allowed in 
the room at this time, and the model has to stay in the same po- 
sition 'until the professor has finished, which is sometimes two 
hours. It is a terrible strain. The ordinary pose is one hour, 
and then a rest of fifteen minutes. 

Paris is no place for a poor man, and as for artists, there is no 
chance at all for them, there are so many. 

I pass Sundays very quietly, either sketching some of the boys 
at the club or going through the different galleries. I spent last 
Sunday at the Louvre, and saw only a fourth of all the pictures, 
for it makes one's head ache to look at the pictures so long. 
Great crowds of tourists are there, with red books telling them 
"how to go through the Louvre in ten minutes." Many Boston 
maidens are among them, and when they come to a picture that 
is " vulgar," they don't look at it at all, no matter how fine it is. 
You can " spot" Americans in Paris without difficulty. They go 
about with their noses poked in the everlasting red guide-book. 



They have a different way from the Parisian-, especially the 
w^men, and it show* conspicuously in Ihelr dress, walk and 
general manner. They either wear glasses, or have blonde balr, 
or walk in a peculiar slow fashion. 

i «fii( with anolhei student to the Oafe" d'Harcourt, one of 
the biggest in Paris, and took In a bit of gay Parisian life. We 
made sketches here till after midnight. It was a brilliant scene, 
as the cafi"- was packed, and all tbe tables and chairs were filled 
with gay young men and women. All around were "paper men" 
selling the evening editions, and vendors of peacock feathers to 
tickle the girls with, besides many others; and all this, mingled 
with shouts of laughter, talking, clinking of glasses and the rum- 
( ble of tbe big tramways, made quite a "musical noise." There 
are crowds of girls dressed in the most artistic and fashionable 
dresses imaginable always here, and they meet men who treat 
them and raise Cain. The girls have their dresses pinned away 
up above their knees, skipping around, doing the "split" and a 
lot of high kicking. One girl kicked three of the globeB off the 
chandelier, one after another, of course smashing them all, but 
the boys paid for the fun. In the corners you see girls kissing 
the men, sitting on their knees and dancing on the tables. 

It is wonderful how they dre^s in Paris — how chic they always 
are. No matter how poor or how homely, tbey have a touch 
about their clothes that is admirable. You will even see old 
women dressed like young, and they too have that fine dash and 
dainty touch. Besides, tbe dresses all fit perfectly. And such 
pretty hats and bonnets one never saw before — some made out 
of nothing, but the artistic touch is there. Not a particle of paint 
or powder is used. Only the lower class or " night ladies" use 
them. I spend much of my time out of school in studying tbe 
women here. They have a dash that is unknown in America. 
They walk along the street with their dresses pulled away up in 
back and front, displaying their ties and black stockings {they 
all wear ties), and no one ever notices them. If this should be 
done in San Francisco it would create a sensation. 

You see the peasants dressed in queer costumes, and wearing 
sabots filled with straw, and some of the women with white caps. 
Everything is neat and clean. It is amusing to see the big 
laundry wagons going about the city delivering washing. The 
whole family climb in, and some sew, others peel potatoes and 
get things ready for supper against their return, and the children 
work around the clothes. Idleness is unknown in France. In 
summer you go into Ihe gardens and see the nurses minding the 
children, while their mistresses sew clothing or do embroidery 
under the trees. Even tbe old women are not idle. 

There are pitiful scenes in the studio sometimes. You often 
see some poor girl, who probably cannot get work, standing 
blushing before the crowd of students, not knowing what to do, 
for this is the first time she has been forced by poverty to earn 
her livelihood as a model. It is poverty that ruins thousands of 
girls in Paris. They get only seven dollars a week for posing all 
day, while in America they receive from two dollars and a half 
to three dollars a day. 

I have been working up some street scenes, of which there is 
a wonderful variety. We have what are called the "chanters de 
la rue"— the men who sell songs. Three or four of them, 
standing in a row, sing a song which tbey are selling, and the 
crowd stand around until they have learned the tune, and then 
they buy the song. It is a queer sight — a big crowd of pretty 
damsels, miserables, soldiers, laborers, etc., standing for b,ours 
around the singers, trying to catch the air before buying the 
words. Then there are the chestnut vendors and the oyster sell- 
ers. In front of every caf,6 is an "oyster depot " in charge of a 
woman, who has baskets of oysters with the quality and prices 
plainly marked. After you have made your purchase the woman 
opens them for you. The oysters are horrible — not like the lus- 
cious ones in New York. They taste bitter, as do also the shrimps. 

If you get up about five o'clock and stroll down toward the 
river, you will see hundreds of men and women digging in the 
slop tanks which are placed on the Bidewalks to be carted away. 
It is pitiful to see women-r-some quite pretty, but all in rags and 
freezing with cold — dig away at the slops with their hands. An- 
other queer sight in these hours is the women delivering big 
loads of French bread. Some have little wagons, which they push, 
while others simply carry about three dozen big loaves in their 
aprons, which is not an easy thing to do. Then come the street- 
sweepers, men and women by the score, armed with long brooms, 
and each takes a certain space. Then the water is turned on, 
and the gutters are like small rivers. At nine o'clock everything 
is as neat as a pin, and the water in the gutters clear as crystal. 
You see thirsty horses stop and drink it, and I even saw several 
poor fellows wash themselves in it. Other picturesque things 
are tbe kiosks, or news-stands, in each block, in charge of some 
old Frenchwoman. They are little round houses, and with the 
huge advertisements all over them make a color picture. 

They don't water the milk here as they do in San Francisco. 
Every morning you see the goat-milk seller going along the 
streets blowing his whistle and followed by a flock of goats. You 
call him, and he milks them in your presence. 

EUWARD CT7CDEL. 



SAN EKANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



Jan. 6, 1894. 



-^m^^^^^^^7~^MjmL 




We Obey no 



but Pleasures."— Tom Hood. 



THE Palmer Company, at the Baldwin, may not be drawing 
quite a9 large houses with Lady Windermere's Fan as it might 
have done with a new play for the second week; but it is cer- 
tainly deepening the agreeable impression made by that play on 
Its first presentation. Even the implied anachronism in the easy 
and graceful flippancy and sparkle of the dialogue with its 
eighteenth century flavor of conversation as a fine art, has a 
charm something like the faint, soggestive aroma of an old rose 
jar of the same period — rather reminiscent than anachronistic. 
Despite the adverse and undoubtedly prejudiced criticism with 
which it has been assailed, Lady Windermere's Fan will probably 
maintain a permanent place on the stage, possessing, as it does, 
the prime requisites for such permanence — an interesting story, 
a dramatic coherence, and brilliant dialogue. 

Next Monday night Henry Arthur Jones's drama, The Dancing 
Girl, also new here, will introduce to us J. H. Stoddart, George 
Fawcett, and other members of the company not yet seen. 

The second and last week of A Trip to Chinatown at the Cali- 
fornia is keeping up the success of the first. The whistling of 
Harry Gilfoil is the plowboy's pastime developed into a fine art, 
and Mr. Gilfoil appears to be, in addition, no mean "practitioner 
at the bar," handling his glasses and bottles like a past-master of 
mixology. Bessie Clayton's dancing deserves more than passing 
mention, involving not only the essential essence of gracefulness, 
but considerable novelty and originality where these qualities 
would seem almost impossible. 

To-morrow night will see the last of this merry group of fun- 
makers at the California. They will be followed on Monday 
evening by Barlow Brothers' Minstrels for a one-week's engage- 
ment. 

* * * 

The beautifully-mounted spectacle at the Tivoli continues to 
crowd that fortunate house. It is worth seeing more than once, 
not only by the average amusement-seeker, bat by the tired 
brain-worker, who finds enough "intellectual incitement" in his 
daily toil and would take his recreation straight. The scenic 
presentation of "The Sunset City" is an appopriate and beautiful 
finale. 

•X * * 

Fanny Rice has had two weeks of excellent business at Stock- 
well's in A Jolly Surprise, "new soled and heeled and revamped" 
for coast travel. On one or two occasions even the nowadays 
locally unknown legend, "Standing Room Only," has been dis- 
played. To-night Miss Rice will appear in her new play, Miss 
Innocence Abroad. 

* # * 

The fragile and eccentric basis of theatrical fame and fortune 
is illustrated in the fact that Lottie Collins, ihe originator of the 
Boom-de-ay horror, is quoted as the "highest-priced artist on the 
stage to-day." Let Forrest and Booth lie quiet in their graves; 
they did not die a day too soon. Bat Lottie is alive, very much 
alive, and kicking. It is the kicking, mainly, that has placed 
her at " the head of her profession " — in the matter of price. For 
the aid and guidance of those just setting out for the goal of dra- 
matic success, may we not generalize from the premises the great 
truth : "The higher the heels, the higher the price," or something 
to that effect? It would go far toward instructing beginners in 
the way they should go if they would make a short cut to glory 
and money. 

And now San Francisco is to see Lottie Collins, the ta-ra-ra- 
boomer, who kicks over criticism and conventionality with one 
foot and always comes down on the other, whose fame covers 
two continents and takes in every crowned head in the world 
that ever got a equint at her. She will crowd the California on 
her opening night as all the great actors of the world could not 
crowd it. She will show us that the Ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay we 
think ourselves so familiar with is but the faint and far-off 
rumbling of the genuine tornado, and that no one can imitate 
Lottie Collins in her own dance unless it be a scarlet windmill 
cut loose from its moorings. She will demonstrate that the 
world's judgment, like herself, has taken a tumble, and is "heels 
over bead." 

Besides the highest price Lottie has a new piece, entitled A 
Naughty Substitute, "written specially for ber," of course, in which 
she will sing the latest London song, "Marguerite," and dance 
the "Rainbow Dance," as well as Ta-ra-ra-etc, while we all 
assist, delighted, at this latter-day apotheosis of heels. 

* * » 

Sunday night will be the la^t of the magnificent Sinbad at the 
Grand Opera House, and probably the last visit to this city of 
the great spectacular extravaganza. 



A young San Franciscan, Miss GenevieveOumuiins, daughter of 
Mrs. Ella Sterling Cummins, well known here as a newspaper 
writer, has recently made a musical success in Chicago. Miss 
Cummins has started on a line as original as interesting, "National 
Songs in Costume." The programme sent contains Hungarian 
ballads, Bedouin love songs, American Indian chants and love 
songs, and ballads in English representing British and American 
songs. As a sample of the latter Miss Cummins chose a song 
composed by Miss Leila France, of this city, thus paying a grace- 
ful compliment to another talented Californian lady. The cos- 
tuming has been pronounced a perfect copy of the originals. In 
the Bedouin songs the singer added a further touch of realism by 
accompanying herself on an Egyptian drum and cymbals, which 
she had learned from native musicians at the Exposition. The 
young lady has been a hard student, having already a repertory 
of thirteen different national songs. 

* * * 

A very enjoyable entertainment was that given recently by the 
Ohabai Shalome Auxiliary at Metropolitan Temple. The Ama- 
teur Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Louis C. Knell, 
did some excellent ensemble work, and a young ladies' orchestra 
under Chas. S. Hoffman gave a laughable as well as musical 
" toy symphony." J. H. Rosewald'a violin solo, the " Fantasie 
Caprice" of Rehfeld, was exquisitely rendered and to an enthus- 
iastic encore the violinist gave a composition of his own, 
"Armenian Serenade," full of the delicacy yet depth of feeling 
characteristic of the composer and player. Specialties by Ferris 
Hartman and several recitations concluded the very agreeable 
programme. 

■* # * 

California is to have a conservatory of music for female stu- 
dents only, which, to judge from the names of the instructors, 
will afford so thorough a musical course as to save our young 
lady musical students from the necessity of Eastern and European 
study. The new conservatory will form a department of Mills 
College, and will be under the direction of Louis Lisser. Mine. 
Julie Rosewald, probably the most successful of local voice train- 
ers, will have charge of the vocal department; J. H. Rosewald of 
violin, choral and ensemble instruction; and the rest of the fac- 
ulty, including professors of elocution, musical history, harmony, 
counterpoint, piano, etc., are equally well known in profes- 
sional circles. 

* * * 

Commencing January 15th, The Ensign, one of the most popu- 
lar martial dramas, will play a two-weeks' return engagement at 

the California. Madame Melba is reported as dissatisfied with 

her American reception and to contemplate an early departure 

for Europe Miss Alice L. Shaw is still " whistling for her 

pay," and no small pay, either, this time, in Philadelphia.—— 
Miss Rosa Linde, the soprano, has made a very favorable impres- 
sion wherever she has appeared with the Henri Marteau con- 
cert season. A piano recital, which promises to be very 

interesting, will be given this evening at Harmony Hall on Ellis 
street, between Polk and Larkin, by Mrs. Noah Brandt and her 

pupils. A Chicago musical paper chronicles the New York 

debut of " Miss Ellen Beach Taw," of 8an Francisco. Miss Taw 

should make her y's plainer. The Carr-Beel concerts will be 

resumed at once, the first " pop" of the new series being an- 
nounced for January 20th. The Wilkie ballad concerts will be 

held hereafter in Maple Hall of the Palace Hotel, as during the 
first season, and under their old title, the Wilkie Palace Ballad 
Concerts. The first will be given toward the end of the current 
month. 



IT WAS ONLY A KISS. 



I KISSED her, I kissed her; she didn't refuse, 
And who was there poorer or wiser? 
Her lips were so ripe that I couldn't but choose 

With one little kiss to surprise ber; 
And the stars they looked on in a wondering way, 

For they're wiser, much wiser and older 
Than when Adam kissed Eve in the garden, they say. 
Heigho! but they're older and — colder. 

I kissed her, I kissed her; the man in the moon 

Winked once, and returned to his dreaming, 
For he knows 'tis the way of earth's children to spoon 

When the stars through the treetops are gleaming. 
Her lips were so luscious, so ripe and so red, 

That I had been less than a mortal 
Had I failed to partake of the feast for me spread, 

Or to halt at that beautiful portal. 

I kissed her, I kissed her; her cheeks were aflame 

While her lips to my own I was pressing — 
Ah, the bright god of love such a trophy might claim, 

And deem it his ultimate blessing! 
Oh, to kiss and to tell, it is treason, they say, 

And I wouldn't have told had I missed her; 
But what is there wrong in a man, growing gray, 

li he kisses his sister, his sister? 
Stockton, Cal., January, 1894. a. j. w. 



Jan. 6, 1894. 



BAN TO INCISCO NEWS LETTER 



QOTHAM GOSSIP. 

New Yore, December 14, 1R93. 

ALL the joys ami beardebes of the Merrie Cbrlstmas-tide are 
now things of the past. The uoselrtsb participants fn the 
Christmas customs are beaming upon those who remembered 
them and reviling tbose who did Dot] and are comparing ruefully 
their anticipation and their realization of tbe joyous season. More 
and more as we grow older do ire realise bow entirely Christmas 
festivities are meant for children It is their merry laughter, their 
happy excitement, their rapturous surprises, which give the day's 
celebration its joyous character, and In homes where the baby 
voices are not beard Christmas means chietly a lot of ungrateful 
bother. I most congratulate the News Letter upon its beautiful 
Christmas edition — tbe most artistic that any weekly in the 
country has sent oat, so far as I have seen. Tbe outer cover is 
charming and tbe contents quite worthy of previous Christmas 
numbers. 

A part of tbe season's social festivities was tbe dinner given a 
few nights ago to tbe Rev. Gregory Lines by his vestrymen to 
celebrate his return. There were fifteen or twenty guests; an 
informal reception followed the dinner. TheChurch of (he Beloved 
Disciple is joining by degrees the extreme High Church faction, 
and its parish paper prints weekly a description and explanation 
of the ancient ritual, which is gradually being restored in tbe ser- 
vice. The Christmas music was very tine in this church. 

Another Christmas dinner was given at the Belgravia by Mr. 
John Mackay, who is evidently fostering his operatic tastes, for 
be is to be seen almost nightly in his box at the Metropolitan, as 
assiduons and attentive a listener as Mrs. Whitelaw Keid, who is 
also almost constant in her attendance. 

Speaking of music reminds me of Mrs. D. C. Nichols' intention 
of going abroad with two of her pupils in the spring. She will 
place them under her old teacher, delle Sedie, and their daily study 
will be with her. Miss Eleanor Mayo will go at the same time. 

Mr. Theodore Kearny, who expected to leave for California on 
Christmas eve, was detained by business aod will not leave until 
to-morrow night. He will remain in the West only until the 
spring, returning then to New York. 

I heard lately from Chicago of an old Californian who is as 
popular a man about town there as he once was in Ban Francisco 
— no other than the redoubtable Wayman Budd, who was once, 
years ago, the "king pin" and "head devil" of all the pranks 
played in tbe wild and hilarious Board of Brokers as it was in 
tbe good old days. He has made and lost more than one fortune 
since he took up his abode in tbe "Windy City," bat at present 
is flourishing. He has a pretty villa in the suburbs and a finely 
arranged town bouse. Mrs. William H. Grattan, who has been 
spending tbe last few months in and about Chicago, accompanied 
by two of her grandchildren, returned to New York laBt week to 
await the arrival of her daughter, Mtb. Dyckman. Mrs. Dyck- 
man has been to California with her husband, visiting their large 
Napa Valley property. They have renewed their lease of the 
pretty apartment in the "Poeantico," at Broadway and Fifty- 
third streets. 

I saw Charley Dungan on Broadway yesterday. He is return- 
ing to sing in New York — with no regret, I dare say, since New 
York is the hope and sometimes the despair of every one con- 
nected with the stage. By the way, an ex-Californian, Henry 
Guy Carleton, has scored another success as a dramatist. His 
new play, Butterflies, was produced in Boston last night with 
absolute eclat. Every year sees his work more sought after and 
more appreciated, and he is becoming a bloated bondholder. His 
apartment in North Washington Square is the most artistic man's 
apartment in New York. The furniture is all old colonial, and 
be possesses magnificent pieces of old mahogany, superbly 
carved. He has one room which is a dream of Oriental luxury. 
A huge divan, hung and draped with rare old embroideries, occu- 
pies one corner, and easy couches and cushions are so generously 
strewn abont the room that a caller is perforce reduced to utter 
indolence. I had tbe pleasure of going to a breakfast in this 
ideal apartment, and had not the breakfast been tbe work of a 
cordon bleu one's appetite (material) must have failed in tbe con- 
templation of so much of the beautiful. He will give a supper 
on his return from Boston to celebrate his new success. 

Passe-Pautout. 



CHARITY is one of the few things that are justified in not 
advertising — in fact, ft is the only thing. But even charity 
can set a good example by letting its good deeds be made known. 



The Rebagliati Spanish Quintette can be engaged for concerts, 
dinners, recitals, weddings, teas, etc., etc., by addressing .T. M. Shaw- 
han, manager, 211 Sansome street, San Francisco, Cal. 

N. B.— These musicians do not play for dancing. 



The long and complete list of Japanese works of art kept on sale 
by George T. Marsh, on Market street, under the Palace Hotel, 
tempts lovers of the beautiful and bizarre from all parts of the State. 
Even those who do not contemplate a purchase will extract great 
pleasure from a visit to this artistic house. 



tfanagi r 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

A.L II iymaS A Co.. Proprietor* | J. J. QOTTLOB 

Monday; January - \ ,„ii y . Tho famou* 

BARLOW BROTHERS 
MAMMOTH MINSTRELS. 

so Otlobretod Artuu, 
Monday. January is— Return of lut leuon'a peal buccoss; the glorious 
naval drama, 

THE ENSIGN. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Al Hayman a Co 

Monday evening. .lauuary [to, 

IMPORTANT EVKNTI A. M. Pa'raer's Stock Company (from Palmer's 
Theatre, New York), presenting for the first time here, 



Lessees and Proprietors 



THE DANCING GIRL, 

By IU-ury Arthur Jones, author of "The Stiver Kiug," Saiuts 
and Sinners,'' Etc , in which the eutire Palmer company will 
appear. 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE- 

Under the direction of Al. Hayman & Co. 

TO-NIGHT. Matinee to-day. SUNDAY MGHT. Last per- 
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AMERICAN EXTRAVAGANZA CO. 

World's Fair CIM R A T» DAVID HENDERSON, 

Greatest Sensation, oii> u^iij Sole Manager. 

A thousand ent ra ncing features in one great big entertainment. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreling Bros Proprietors and Managers. 

Tonight. "You can't Lose Me, Charley." The greatest of all successes, 

THE ISLAND OF JEWELS. 

All records beaten by our great record breaker. Our competitors badly 
distanced, The talk of the town. See the Electric March. The Wondrous 
Transformation. California's Crowning Glory, "Sunset City." 

Popular PaicBs 25 and 50c 

SAN FRANCISCO ART ASSOCIATION LOAN EXHIBITION 

AT THE 

MARK HOPKINS INSTITUTE OF ART, 

Corner California and Mason Streets. 
Open daily, including Sundays. 

CONCERT THURSDAY EVENINGS. 
A OMISSION. 50 Cents. 

I II I IAN RFnnARn The English actress, coaches ladies and 
LILLIHIl DLUL/H liL/, gentlemen for the dramatic profession; ap- 
pearances arranged. SHAKESPEAREAN ACADEMY, 1007 California 
Street, opposite the Flood Mansion. 

THE CALIFORNIA HOTEL, BUSH ST - "£"?. K " RNr - 

The only strictly European Plan and Fire- 
proof Hotel in the City. Select music 
every evening in Restaurant between 6 and 
8 o'clock- 
A. K1NZLER, Manager. Send for one of our "Facts Worth Knowing." 



YOU 

SHOULD 
KNOW 
THE 
BANJO. 



Ashton P. Stevens 

Has Resumed Instruction 

26 MONTGOMERY ST., 
Room No. 8. 



SLATE BURIAL VAULTS. 

Are recommended by every person who sees them. They are proot 
against dampness, rodents and reptiles; are portable to ship to any part 
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PIANOS 



SAN EKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. ' . 1894 



]\)% Looker-09. 



THE Century Club of this city is composed of estimable women. 
Besides entertaining distinguished women who have made a 
place for themselves in the world by force of talent, they aim to 
inform themselves in matters concerning the advancement of 
women. To this end they have lectures by eminent women 
(Edmund Russell was one of them). Not long ago they had an 
uncommon experience, which is worthy of relation. It had been 
announced that a certain woman of considerable local fame would 
lecture before them. This woman belongs to the gutter and the 
slums, and it was regarded as rather a daring thing to invite her 
to address the well-dressed, well-fed ladies of the Century Club. 
But the very boldness of the enterprise attracted a large attend- 
ance of the members — dimity and lace would for once brush 
against a coarse woolen fabric, and dainty perfumes would mingle 
with (he harsh odors of the Barbary Coast. The strange woman 
sat there waiting for the wide parlors to till, and the rustling of 
silks, the sparkling of diamonds, and the gentle waving of lace 
fans seemed not to disturb her. Sbe did not appear to feel op- 
pressed by a consciousness that, with her cheap but decent 
clothes — all out of fashion — her queer bonnet, her ungloved 
hands and her substantial, well-worn shoes, sbe was at all out of 
place among these thoroughbred sisters removed so vast a social 
distance from her. There were a strange, firm tenderness in her 
comely face, and a wholesome color in her cheeks; and in her 
large and handsome brown eyes tbere shone a steady light that 
was more potent than the blaze of all the diamonds flashing 
around her. When, finally, she was introduced as the speaker, 
she mounted the platform with a steady step; and in perfect self- 
possession, without a single one of those trite apologies for ineffi- 
ciency which the ladies were so accustomed to hear, sbe went 
directly into her subject; and calmly, in a straightforward man- 
ner, without a single effort for dramatic effect, but in a rich and 
sympathetic voice, albeit an uncultivated one, proceeded as fol- 
lows: 

<• I can best make you understand the character of the work 
we are doing by relating one of the many incidents which arise in 
the course of our labors. Not long ago the police authorities in- 
formed me that they had received notice from the country that a 
girl had come to San Francisco for the purpose, it was feared, of 
entering upon a life of shame." [At this some of the ladies in 
the audience covered their faces with their fans, but the strange 
woman gave no heed to that.] » The police added that the notice 
bad come from her father and mother — plain country people — and 
that they were broken-hearted. The police said that they had 
found her in a house of ill-repute, and that, failing to induce her 
to return, they had notified the father. The old couple got a little 
money together, came to the city, and with tears and prayers 
pleaded with their daughter to go back with them. But she told 
them firmly that she bated the farm; that sbe would never milk 
the cow or scrub the floors or cook the meals again; that it all 
filled her with horror, and that she loved the wild, brilliant, beau- 
tiful city, the dashing men, and the careless, pleasure-filled life 
upon which sbe had entered. All pleadings were in vain; and 
so, weeping and broken, they dragged themselves back to the 
hard, empty, desolate life at home, from which the light had gone 
forever. 

" This was the reason why the police had come to me — they 
bad failed and her parents had failed. Would I save her ? 8aid 
I, ' With God's help I will try.' I knew that I bad been appealed 
to as a last resort, and that the task was a very difficult one; but 
I said to them and I said to myself, ' With God's help I will try.' 

" So I went forth and found her. 1 talked plainly, but in a 
kindly way, to her. 8he was high-spirited and stubborn, and at 
first sbe tried to drive me away with ridicule. She called me 
names, and said that I envied her, and did not know what life 
was. When that failed to repulse me sbe became sullen and 
silent, and then I knew that 1 had to leave her alone for a time. 

"It was not until I had made my third call and appeal that 
the true womanly side of her nature triumphed over the evil 
which dominated her. Calmly and deliberately, without any 
emotion, but moved solely by her common sense, she consented 
to abandon her evil life and become one of us. Gladly did I 
take her into our camp. The kindness and gentleness of the other 
girls were new and strange to her, and did her good. The marks 
of dissipation left her face, and then I saw bow pretty she was. 
Her old parents were made happy by the news, and the light 
came again into their desolate lives. Aftera time, when it seemed 
that she bad come thoroughly under the influence of the new and 
better life, sbe expressed a desire to go out into the world and 
earn her livelihood in a decent way. I was glad to hear this, and 
I encouraged her. She found a pleasant situation as a domestic 



in an eminently respectable Christian family " — here the speaker 
paused, for an unwonted hardness had come into her voice, and 
she appeared to be trying to repress it — " and I saw her now and 
then and encouraged her all I could. 

"Suddenly, without a word, without leaving a trace, she 
dropped out of sight; and then my heart Bank, and I was dis- 
mayed. I said to myself, 1 1 have failed, but I will try again — 
with God's help I will try again.' 

" It took me a long time to find her, for she knew that I would 
not give her up, and that with God's help I would find her. And 
at last I succeeded. She had wearied of the dullness which con- 
cealment entailed, and had taken a position as waitress in an 
underground dance hall. It was there that I found her. 
• * ■• 

" I went into the dive. You ladies have never visited one cf 
these places. There is a stage on which songs, dances and little 
comedies are given. Girls in short dresses, low-necked and sleeve- 
less, serve drinks to the men who sit at little tables in the main 
hall, and to other men who are in private boxes running around 
the room where the balcony is in theatres. I found my poor friend 
1 working the boxes,' as they say in such places, for she was 
prettier and plumper than most of the other girls, and could sell 
more liquor; and then, the men in the boxes generally have more 
money than those down-stairs. Her face was flushed from drink- 
ing. When sbe saw me she started to run away, but I followed 
her. She was angry and insulting, and said sbe did not want to 
have anything to do with me. I quietly told her to come to the 
stairs with me, that I would not annoy her, and that, no matter 
how indifferent she was to me and my own happiness, I could 
not tear her out of my life so easily. This touched her a little, 
and she went to the stairs with me. Again I pleaded and warned, 
but her face was hard and her look determined. 

" >Yon have been very good to me,' she said, < and I shall never 
forget that. I am sorry I was rude to you just now, but I 
couldn't help it. I am determined on this course, and you have 
no right to annoy me and make me miserable. Go your way and 
leave me alone. AH the angels in heaven and all the devils in 
hell could not make me change my mind. Go your way and leave 
me in peace.' 

"' But, my dear,' I said, 'something must have occurred to 
change you so. You were doing so nobly. Let me be your friend 
and confidante. Tell me what happened that started you on this 
life again.' 

* * # 

" Her eyes flashed malignantly, and the hardness in her face 
was terrible to see. Sbe tossed up her arms defiantly, and with 
violent anger said : ■ Ob, your fine Christian ladies! When they 
hear what we have been they treat us like vipers! ' 

" That was all she said on that subject, and I wanted to hear 
no more. 1 felt something hard and cold seize my heart then, for 
to be charitable always is the severest task in the world. But 
Instantly everything broke down before the wretched picture of 
angry despair which stood before me. Every warm drop of blood 
in my body responded to the sympathy which welled up within 
me. I did not heed her determination, repeated again and again 
as we stood there, to continue in the way she had chosen. My 
mission of reform was drowned in the flood of humble sorrow 
which welled up within me. Forgetting everything but pity, I 
took her in my arms and kissed her, and held her close to my 
breast. And while unconscious tears fell from my face upon hers 
1 said, « Go your way, my poor wounded dove; I shall not trouble 
you again ; and may God in heaven pity you I ' 

" To my amazement she broke down completely — that touch of 
human sympathy had worked a miracle. She caught me in her 
arras and kissed me again and again, and sobbed as though her 
heart bad been broken." 

The strange woman paused, for the steady light in her soft 
brown eyes was dimmed with tears, and her firm, round voice 
was unsteady. 

" And now," she presently said, " thanks to God and the 
heavenly gift of sympathy that He has sent to us upon earth, my 
friend is, to-day, and as long as she lives will continue to be, one 
of the truest and noblest women that bless the world with the 
light of their presence. That, ladies, will give you an idea of 
some of the work which we women of the Salvation Army are 
doing." The strange woman took her seat, and the grave-like 
silence rendered all the more conspicuous many furtive attempts 
to dry moist eyes with dainty handkerchiefs; and thus swings the 
Century Club from Elmund Russell to humanity. 

One begins to believe in the law of compensation when one 
reads of counts and viscounts being decoyed by scented notes to 
the Park and then robbed. For years they have been preying 
upon our younger aristocracy and filling the heads of our young 
females with tales of glittering coronets worn in throne rooms 
and halls of dazzling light. Now the socialistic footpad is attend- 
ing to the :olemn business of seeing that everything shall come 
out even. 

Dr. Hammono recommends, as a certain cure for chronic indigestion 
and dyspepsia, chewing Adams' Pepsin Chewing Gum after each meal for 
half an hour. 



Jan. 6, 1808. 



SAN PR w Im O \r\\ 9 u ] i EH 



The ftad hi* wtf* w*nt down lo (be Del Monte l**f 

w»*k I Sew Yur'i days, and to w«ich IMS vanish 

n ft quiet, p*ftc*ftt>lc way, without the ftOOOmpftQl- 
roan t of tin born*, steam wbtallaa anu fire-crackers. We were 
vtry much Impressed with the gloriOOl climate, the birds lIogtDff 
ever and anon In tbe (all pines, the crescent moon shedding its 
ailvery rays o'ftf the sleeping world. Ibe breakers' looftSftftnt roar 
on (he sandjr beach, and all that and mora, too. but what at 
meMd us most was the waU which the young ladies of tbfl 
hotel affected. One lady called it a Moorish walk, because it r«- 
minded ber of some of the wentrt dances that she had seen while at- 
tending the Worlds Kair. We do not know how the girts manage 
to do It, although we have tried very hard. Sjwenow they throw 
tbeir shoulders back and curve their arms backward until they 
/the arms) look like the plucked wings of a turkey. Sometimes 
they rest their hands on their hips, but we believe it is considered 
tbe thing to let them hang listlessly, with the fingers closed and 
the thumbs turned up. After they have struck this position suc- 
cessfully they start to walk, and do so with a swagger in which 
the head and shoulders sway to one side, while the hips, curved 
arms and bands sway to tbe other. It must, indeed, be a diffi- 
cult accomplish meat. To do it gracefally is hard work, and is 
likely to dislocate tbe spine. While the Lookek-On was passing 
through the uiain corridor on New Year's eve, he saw a most 
charming young damsel coming toward hiru with tbe Moorish 
walk. Observing tbe apparent torture which the young lady 
was suffering, he hastened into the parlor, so that she could pass 
unnoticed. He looked around thecornerof tbe door and watched 
tbe budding maid. She cast a hasty glance over her shoulder, 
and as she did not see any one, relaxed her shoulders, spine, 
hips, arms and thumbs, and walked as naturally and beautifully 
as a nun. Egad, but it did us good to see her walk naturally, 
and if we had dared we would have clasped her to our heart and 
kissed her brow, and said : "My child, you are a daniphool." We 
advise girls to drop this vulgar and suggestive Moorish walk, 
which is becoming as common as mud in Oakland water. It 
used to be tbe style for young ladies to walk with their chins 
pressed to their breasts; it used to be the style for young ladies 
lo walk with a bustle as big as a pillow; and now if it is going to 
be the style for them to walk with their spines bent in and their 
arms bent out, we would much rather have them walk on their 
beads. 

8am Byers is one.of the best-known stage drivers on the coast, 
north of Point Reyes. Sam drives a stage from Point Arena to 
Cazadero and Ukiah, and has a big clientele among drummers. 
They have been too much for him. When he first went upon the 
road, he was a blithe and happy individual. He used lo enjoy the 
drummers' stories, and to laugh heartily at their jokes. Now he 
is a firm believer in that pessimistic doctrine that there is nothing 
new under tbe sun. His eyes become filled with tears when he 
relates the agonies he has undergone. He declares that in the 
fifty-three miles between Point Arena and Ukiah, be has heard 
in three months the same story twenty-six t.mes. If he does not 
laugh he is debarred from the flask and the cigars which the drum- 
mers always carry. His laugh, therefore, has become hollow and 
perfunctory. He has a property smile for each joke. He cannot 
understand why some sort of a syndicate is not formed to manufac- 
ture jfsts for those merry men of the road. Ah, 8am should spend 
a week in the conversation room of the Pacific Union Club. He is 
partially and prematurely gray now. The jokes of that institution 
would make him as white as Mount 8hasta's crest and as bald as 
a D-street sand lot. 

* * * 

Boreas roars among the complaining woods of Oakland, but its 
much threatened Mayor, Dr. Pardee, still lives. The dynamite 
bomb which was to end the existence of that admirable patriot 
has not yet been thrown. Mysterious letters are dropped all 
about in the market places, and under the stately colonnades of 
Oakland's marble palaces, announcing that the Mayor is to die, 
but the Pardee appetite remains unimpaired. Some days ago a 
sympathetic citizen called upon the doctor. "I am afraid to 
enter," said the mild joker (Alameda county jokes are all mild), 
"for there may be dynamite in the corner." The Mayor took tbe 
hint, and swung with easy grace a big demijohn over bis left 
shoulder. And as the deacon smacked his lips, he sagely re- 
marked, "There may be no dynamite in it, doctor, but a few 
drinks would get me a deuce of a blowing up when I reach home." 



Since the formation of a Ladies' Literary Club, not a few of our 
rising young poets have been shunning the barber, and endeavor- 
ing to live up to the great hirsute example set by that veteran 
apostle of the Muses, Joaquin Miller. They expect to be called 
upon in due order to appear before the ladies and speak their 
pieces. But the task of emulating Joaquin's locks is as hopeless 
as that of excelling bis poetry. The hillside bard was in town 
this week, and his long hair floated over his shoulders iu becom- 
ing if dandruffy profusion. Only once was the equanimity of 
the poet disturbed, and that was when an irreverent person on 
Montgomery street pointed him out as "Lewis, the Light." 






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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 6, 1 c94 




NOTWITHSTANDING the anything but flourishing result of 
the Town and Country Club's two years of life, still another 
ladies' club has been started, most of the members being identi- 
cal, although the Fair Oaks-Menlo Park contingent is not so 
marked a feature of the latest organization, city folks having 
more to say and do in its affairs. Men are apt to say that a 
woman's club cannot be successfully maintained. It remains to 
be seen whether this cruel remark can be proved true. To be 
sure, women are more likely to allow personal likes and dislikes 
to influence them in close club life than men, but by force of cir- 
cumstances, the average female member cannot be so "close " a 
frequenter of her club as the male of her family. Domestic life 
has its cares and duties, and a woman who performs these duties 
conscientiously must spend more of ber time at home than abroad. 
Men, au contrairc, are not restrained by any such ties, and to 

them some of them, at least — the club is more of a home than 

their "aine fireside." There are women, however (more's thft 
pity), who cast aside these home duties with as much noncha- 
lance as men, and to this class, and to dwellers in hotels and 
boarding houses, the new club will no doubt be a favorite resort. 
The ladies, in commenting upon its many adrantages, describe 
it as "a lovely place to rest and chat, to have a snack or cup of 
tea, and to make appointments." All very true. But the chat 
will possibly become gossip, and the "appointments" also pos- 
sibly will be a theme for tongues that wag. 

If any evidence were required by skeptics as to the growth of 
our social world, it would be furnished by the fact that Mrs. Will 
Crocker and the Eyres, as well as the Hotel del Monte, each gave 
a dance on the same evening — New Year's night. 
* * # 

It is generally supposed that the same set of beaux do duty 
for every << function," but here they had to divide and let each 
have a share, so it has proved that the opening of the year 
showed the possibility of more than one "society function" being 
successfully given the same night. 

* * » 

The Crocker contingent were greatly missed from the Del Monte 
dance, as to many they are the chief attraction for a trip to Mon- 
terey, and the hotel hop suffered in consequence. 

San Rafaelites are deep in the mysteries of getting up fancy 
dress for the bal costume to be given on Mardi Gras at the Hotel 
Rafael. Apropos of San Rafael, the charming brides-elect and the 
happy men who stand in the position of futurs, made a merry 
party around the Christmas dinner table at William Barber's 
Ross Valley home. Such a happy gathering proves conclusively 
that a girl's chance of conquest of a good husband does not al- 
ways lie in crowded ballrooms, and also that a man seeks a wife 
in a home life. 

* * * 

The girls are wild with delight at the reappearance of the dan- 
cing party this season, and from the present outlook it would 
seem as though that form of entertainment would shelve the tea. 
Teas are all very well for the ancient dames, dowagers, veteran 
matrons, and experienced demoiselles. But the festive " bud " 
wants to dance, and as this season is unusually rich in buds, no 
doubt they will carry the point. Mrs. George Pope's housewarm- 
ing will be a ball— they hope; but that is not yet decided upon. 

* # * 

The Rathbone Club (which is the reorganized Fortnightly of 
last year) wilt exert its efforts for diversion during Lent. It is said 
that the gallant Major, whose name is given to the club, is doing 
his best to induce a well-known amateur of brilliant musical 
ability to " do" the first part in an operetta for the initial meet- 
ing. 

* * * 

The charming young heiresses, the Misses Hobart, are certainly 
the most popular girls of the day. Already their repulation is es- 
tablished as knowing how to give a ball, and the beaux are vying 
with each other in their desire to take a place beside them. Such 
a snug nest it would be — that palatial abode — these hard times! 
One young man has an inside track in the fact of a sister who is 
chum to the young ladies, and thechances are that his praises are 
chanted to their ears from " morn till dewy eve." The wonder 
is, will it prove successful? 

* * * 

Society folks are hoping for a reception at the Hagers' before 
Lent, although, owing to Mrs. Hager's St. Louis visit and the 
Easter wedding, it is scarcely probable that the hopes of the 
swim will be realized. Everything is roseate at the Gough and 
8acramento street mansion, though If what gossips assert be true, 
the head of the house may be pardooed for being color blind. 



Belated clubmen, or husbands who have " important business 
at their offices" of an evening, are in clover just now, showing 
the truth of the old adage, " It's an 111 wind that blows nobody 
good." For it is only necessary to picture pistols and footpads 
to wives, and the men are begged to stay down at a hotel all 
night rather than encounter such things coming home at a late 
hour! 

* * * 

The rumor now is that the widow whom George Bonny is said 
to be about to espouse is a very old friend, and not a "buxom 
young one," as at first staled. 

■* * * 

Several funny mistakes occurred on New Year's day. One at 
a very swell dance, wbere a youug man, considerably under *he 
influence of champagne punch and bright eyes, essayed the an- 
der-tbe-mistletoe act before the gaze of a well-known young ma- 
tron of the neighborhood. 

* * * 

Mrs. Louis Parrot has taken the place of Mrs. Louis Haggin in 
the role of chaperon at Mr. Wilberforce's tea to-day. The some- 
what erratic movements of the Festetics are very trying to the 
Countess Eila's mamma. 

* ■* * 

On dit, a party of wealthy people on the ragged edge of society 
are meditating a purchase of some of the Mezes tract, near San 
Mateo, with a view of having a good time of their own, quite in- 
dependent of the ultra-conservative set at Burlingame. As the 
intending purchasers are people with ample means at their dis- 
posal, it is on the cards that a right lively rivalry may ensue. 

* * * 

Apropos of rural pleasures, it has been suggested that some of 
the numerous relatives of Trustee Frank Newlands take control 
of the Ralston-Sharon abode at Belmont, and run it as a swell 
boarding house during the midwinter-spring season. It is thought 
that Eastern tourists would gladly embrace an opportunity of 
thus seeing and visiting a spot made famous for hospitality on a 
grand scale in California's best days. 

* * * 

Two newspaper men are spoken of as aspirants for the favor of 
the Van Ness avenue heiresses. No names being given, curiosity 
is alert. 



Quite a fad East is to chew for half an hour after dinner Adams' 
Tutti Frutti Pepsin Chewing Gum for indigestion. 



Mothers be sure aud use "Mrs. Winslows' Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething. 




GREEN SEAL 
Champagne 



From 



DEUTZ & GELDERHANN, 



For sale by 

Wine Merchants 

and Grocers. 

Jl?e B(?st Scores 



(Ay, France.) 

CHARLES HEINECKE & CO., 

Agents: 314 Sacramento St., 
San Francisco. 



ARE MADE WITH THE 

United 5tates <5>artrid<$e Qd.'s 

For flne shooting they are simply perfect. ^artnd^eS. 

LAUREL HILL CEMETERY. 

There are a number of unclaimed bodies of deceased persons lying 
in our receiving vault upon which dues have been delinquent for a 
number of years. As we are about making added improvements, 
and as our space is limited, we are compelled to remove for inter- 
ment elsewhere all such bodies upon which there is a delinquency. 
CHARLES H. CROWELL, Secretary. 



Jan. 6, 1894. 



BAD nuvisco REWS LETTER. 



11 



THE BRIGHTON POISONER. 



Hy Roikrt O. ' 

nllK ;<ruitbsoni«n Wax Works Kxbibitlon m doing uncom- 
monly well. And never in ihe history of Ibis superb organi- 
xation bad it deserved to do any beller. as Ibe figures were 
never in .re numerous n all, to 

say nolblng ol tbe tattooed man, who served nol only Id his 
own spotted capacity, but came in bandy during the war dance 
at tbe evening performance. Hie show was drawing roll bouses, 
and the cards informing the p'iblic of the educational nature of 
Ibe collection always drew the members of the ladies' schools in 
such large numbers that it was found nfcessary to change part of 
the collection of •■ horrors " into kings and queens to please the 
scholastic tastes of these patrons. 

The tent was pitched near the end of town— the town of Gali- 
lee, one of those wild California places where all is one vast wild- 
erness of innocence. Never had Daniel in his den, which was the 
chief moving tableau, worked to better advantage; and the lions 
responded to the clockwork as if it bad just been placed inside 
tbem. The Ticbborne Claimant — and what a lot of wax that 
figure absorbed, to be sure!— was an object of much attention, 
and with the working-class audiences was almost as popular as 
Daniel. But the fashion and intellect of the town took more to 
the figure called Profit and to a ghastly representation of Guiteau, 
that scowled in the darkest corner of the tent. 

But all this is neither here nor there. The troupe had been at 
Galilee a week. We were titling down to supper, after the close 
of the exhibition for the day. When I say ■• we " I mean the 
tatooed man (whose appetite was not affected by his singular 
marking), myself (Henry Jameson, the sole proprietor), Mrs. 
Jameson, who had done the Female Hercules in early life, but 
bad run loo fat of late, and Miss Ethel Jane Jameson, our only 
child. Well, we were sitting out in front of the wagons— for it 
was summer time— enjoying our meal of tripe and onions, when 
suddenly i noticed a form approaching in the dim twilight. It 
was that of a young man. 

When he stepped out into the glow of the lamp be stood hesi- 
tating, apparently wondering whether or not he should advance 
any further, and I could see in the faint light of the lamp that he 
was not tbe most handsome or intellectual young man in the 
world. His forehead came bulging out under his hat, and his 
eyes were large and watery, and there was a vacant look in bis 
face. Still, he seemed harmless, so I beckoned to him and said: 
" Good evening, sir. What can we do for you ? " 
Before he could answer, my wife broke in : " Why, that's the 
young man who has been in every time the tent was open to-day, 
and wanted to know if he could have a season ticket." 

By that time be had come closer, and, smelling the supper, he 
said: « There, I'm disturbing you, I know; but, if you please, 
will the wax works be opened up to-night?" 

The tattooed man, who bad been encored frequently toward tbe 
end of the evening, looked savage at the thought, but I winked 
at him to say nothing. Then I said to the young man: 

" Well, as the tattooed man and Daniel and the lions are sleepy, 
and the people about here seem to have turned in, I'm sure you 
wouldn't ask us to stay open just for yon? " 

" Mel " be said, quite energetically. "Certainly not. But tell 
me, Mr. Jameson, does she sleep?" and he came up quite close 
and whispered in my ear. 
" Meaning who, sir?" said I. 

"Can you ask ? " he replied in a melancholy tone. "Why, 
Christine, of course, my angel, my love I " and he leaned over to 
the tattooed man, and exclaimed hoarsely: "And you, Mr. Wild 
IndiaD, do you love? " 

He's a touchy sort, that tattooed one, and there might have 
been trouble had I not signaled to Mrs. Jameson to give him more 
tripe and onions. Then I looked at the young man. His eyes 
were rolling wildly, and his forehead seemed to bulge more than 
ever. I felt that I must dissemble. 

"Christine does sleep," I murmered sadly; then, turning to 
Mrs. Jameson, asked in an undertone what he meant. 

"Oh, it's that figure of Princess Louise that we've dressed up 
and labeled for the Brighton Poisoner," she replied. " I found 
him kissing it this afternoon." The young man was standing 
gazing at the covered wagon and whistling plaintively. 

"Could I see her," he asked presently, " before I seek my 
couch? I will not wake her, but just kiss the bed clothes and 
retire." 

It was awkward to leave my supper like this, but there was 
determination in his watery eye, and a half-dollar in his fingers. 
" Follow me," I said; and I led the way into the tent wilh the 
solitary lamp, leaving the tattooed man and my wife and daughter 
outside in the growing darkness. He was a bit timid following 
me into the tent, which smelt strongly of stale sawdust and 
orange peel. And no wonder, for the figures were all wrapped 
in sheets and looked ghostly. The Brighton Poisoner stood be- 
tween the Claimant and Brutus. At my caller's request I with- 
drew tbe sheet that covered the Poisoner. 



• Withdraw awhile, Jameson." ho »ald. •■ 1 should like lo ha 
a one with my Cbrl.tlo.." (To., was hi. own name for be" 
le -lipped ho half-dollar Into my hand, and 1 k-fi him In the 
lomliness of the lent, 

• 

Karly on the following morning, ihe tattooed man. who slept 
on a folding col near Daniel's den, ran to my bedside and l 
!"' "'"' ,hr "arlHng information that the shov. 
I knew- that we could not afford to lose any of the valua. ■ 
oar collection, and, without waiting to dress myself, 1 followed 
tbe tattooed man. Sure enough, he was not mistaken, [or when 
my eyes rested mi ihe spot where tbe Brighton Poisoner had 
stood from day to day, there was nothing left but the small 
wooden pedestal, and the absence of tbe figure seemed to give tbe 
place a most gruesome appearance. 

The sun had risen high enough to make the morning beautiful 
—one of those fresh, bright, sharp California mornings that fill 
the soul of man wilh content and love. I hurried from Ihe tent 
and looked around, but there seemed to be no trace of tbe miss- 
ing idol. I resolved to follow the abductor if I could, and 
giving tbe tattooed individual charge of tbe Bhow, I returned to 
the tent. 

Beside the pedestal I noticed that the sawdust had been greatly 
disturbed, and after a moment's study 1 found the place where 
some one had dragged the figure under the canvass. Like a 
hungry bloodhound I started on all-fours, under the canvass 
My hopes were not dismayed, for I could see the trail clearly— 
the foot of the figure had made a sharp cut in the ground 
and the footsteps of the thief were clearly visible in the soft, 
brown soil. So I followed tbe trail nntil I was almost broken 
down with fatigue. Over beds of moss, over banks of wild flow- 
ers, along solitary cattle paths, under chaparral so thick that I 
could hardly force my way through it, down into damp canons, 
over hillsides and along fertile meadows the miscreant had drag- 
ged the leading feature of my show. I must have followed his 
trail for nearly three mi'es, when I came to a deep canon. The 
footprints and tbe cut made by tho foot were plainer than ever, 
and as I entered this ravine, I noticed at its bend, reflecting all 
tbe glory of God's early morning, a beautiful waterfall. It fell 
from the mountain side, seemingly as silent as the breath from a 
maiden's lips, and all that told of its life were the silvery 
beads of spray thrown off in its fall. With my eyes fully opened 
by the marvelous wonders of this dream of nature, I forgot all 
about wife, child, tattooed man and performing lion, and rushed 
to meet it as a child hastens to find the end of a rainbow. Imag- 
ine my astonishment when I pushed through a thicket of young 
willows and saw tbe young man of the night before standing on 
a log that protruded from the bank and stretched out over the 
boiling pool at the foot of the fall. He looked like a maniac, with 
his disheveled hair and wild staring eyes. The Brighton Poisoner 
was clasped to his heart with a strong grasp, and be was uttering 
some inaudible words, with his right hand outstretched to heaven. 
Bnt I inferred that he had come to this wild spot to perform an 
incantation and supplicate the Almighty in his behalf. 

The diaphanous dress of tbe figure was trailing in the water. 
She looked as erect and queenly as ever, but the stare in her 
glassy eyes was awful to behold. 

How he managed to stand on that trembling log was as much 
a part of tbe mystery as everything else. The wavelets caused 
by the fall were strong enough to keep it moving very unsteadily. 
" What are you doing there?" I cried. 

He turned and looked at me. Both arms embraced the figure 
with a death-like tightness. 

" No, no, you shall not take her 1 Go back 1 Go back!" How 
wildly he looked at me! Then, kissing the cold wax face, he 
said: " My Christine, speak! say that you love me! " 

I. could stand no more of this, for I realized the peril of the fig- 
ure. I rushed for the log, intending to recover the figure and re- 
turn with it to the wagon, but in my haste my foot slipped and 
pushed the log with its lovers into the stream. 

Horror of horrors ! I saw it caught by the waves of the boiling 
pool and glide slowly toward the downpouring torrent. I could 
not swim, and I was utterly powerless. Two minutes more and 
all would be over. 

The young man must have seen his danger. But he stood 
erect on the log, and as it was drawing him more swiftly toward 
his death, I heard him cry aloud: "God! Hell! Christine! We 
shall die together. We are going! going! Come, love, speak be- 
fore we die! Kiss me! kiss me, dar " 

That end of the log on which he stood rose high in the mist- 
laden sunshine, as the other felt the impact of the fall, and then 
the Brighton Poisoner and her mad lover plunged to the bottom 
of the stream. 



WE are pained to announce the death of Mrs. Isabel Atwater 
Reid, which occurred last Wednesday at Minneapolis, where 
her father, the Hon. Isaac Atwater, lives. Her many friends here 
were not aware even that she was ill until a cablegram came an- 
nouncing her death. Mrs. Reid was a particularly brilliant woman, 
was well educated and an accomplished writer, and had a large 
circle of friends in San Francisco. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 6, 1894. 




An Active The movement in the leading North End shares 
Mining has been active during the week, and the fluctua- 
Market tions in Con -Cal. Virginia have permitted dealers 
to make large profits. The work in this mine, which is really 
now the key to the situation, has been pushed with such vigor 
that it will not be long now until the point is reached where it is 
expected ore will be found in the Rule drift. The formation 
which has been encountered within the past day or so is of a 
highly encouraging character, and great hopes prevail in well- 
posted circles that the prediction made in certain quarters will 
be fully realized. The stock is very sensitive just now, advanc- 
ing and declining on comparatively light purchases and sales. 
Both Ophir and Mexican have been strong in sympathy, and the 
shorts are taking few chances, operating on a very limited scale. 
Outside of an improvement in Jacket on the 1100 level, there is 
nothing new to report in the South End mines. Orders have 
been sent to the Superintendent of Alta to start up work at that 
mine, with the understanding that he has ore enough in the old 
Btopes to make a fair showing in bullion, sufficient in any event 
to help the shareholders to meet the monthly expense and place 
the property to a large extent on a self-sustaining basis. The 
new management of this property can be depended upon to do 
what is right for the protection of the shareholders, who have 
been abominably robbed in the past, as coming events will show. 
The property is undoubtedly of great value, besides a few other 
assets in the way of claims, has a mill which was erected only a 
short time ago at a cost of $70,000. One would naturally say 
that UDder such conditions the property is selling at a pretty low 
rate at to-day's prices, and it is. 

$ $ -p 
The peculiar action of an English corporation, the 



A Story 

With 
A Moral. 



Bolivia Gold Mining Company of London, in de- 
claring a dividend of one shilling and sixpense a 
share, one day recently, and the day following levying an assess- 
ment of one shilling a share, is affording the financial press of this 
enlightened country much fun. It certainly was a strange trans- 
action, with no redeeming feature, even in the way of stock 
manipulation. But we can do things rather better over here in 
an emergency. Not so long ago a stock operator, who — thanks 
to his Satanic Malevolence — is still to the fore, found it necessary 
to raise the wind. He took a way of doing it very much similar 
to that of the Bolivia people, but cleaned up the spoils in a rather 
more scientific manner. One of the numerous companies under hia 
control was well provided with mule teams, and these were sold 
to fill a depleted treasury. The money derived from the sale per- 
mitted the announcement of a twenty-five cent dividend on the 
capital stock. On the strength of this disbursement, before the 
day came for the payment, the shares advanced from a bedrock 
valuation in the cents to $8, at which enormous profit the bulk of 
it was unloaded on a confiding public. A month later an assess- 
ment of 25 cents was levied to buy the mules back, which evened 
matters up, the stock tumbling back to its old 5-cent level con- 
siderably faster than it went up. It would be hard to find the 
same property on the map to-day, although doubtless many of 
the investors at from $5 to $8 a share still retain some of the old 
certificates of stock as a reminder that they are apt now and then 
to run against people in this world who are just a little bit 
smarter than themselves. 

$ $ $ 

Neuj Capital The gold mines at Silver Peak', in Esmeralda 
for- County, Nev., have changed hands again. What 

St'luer Peak, a history could be written of these properties! 
Many years ago, one of the finest mills in the State was erected 
to work the ores, only to be left eventually to the mercy of the 
elements and of the raids of the mining population in the vicinity. 
The well known Catherwood family, of New York, were then 
the principal owners, and when one uf the firm last visited the 
mines, about six years ago, only the smokestack was left and 
some machinery which could not have been very well packed off 
without attracting more than ordinary attention. At that time a 
few bowlders on the surface were broken open, and the gold 
stood out in them like currants in an old-fashioned plum pudding. 
What the difficulty was in working these mines has never yet 
been satisfactorily explained, and it is to be hoped that the new 
company, composed of wealthy capitalists in this city, will be 
more successful than their predecessors, who were evidently al- 
ready too rich to care very much about a mining investment 
which must have cost them, at the least, a million of dollars. 
A little energy, backed bj sufficient capital, ought to do much 
for this particular section of Nevada, which is uncommonly fertile 
in minerals. 

n $ 

THE retirement of the ReddiDg and Granite State Fire Insurance 
Companies of Philadelphia on January 1st is announced. 



Valuable Che articles of incorporation of the Pioneer Mining 
Mining Company have just been filed to work a valuable 

Property, piece of ground in the mother lode near Jackson, in 
Amador county. Work has been going on at the mine for some 
months past, the intention being to sink to a depth of at least 
1000 feet before any attempt is made to open up the ore body, 
which has already been well developed at different points. The 
mine is considered one of the most promising in a locality famous 
for its mineral wealth, and from several of the adjoining locations 
a number of large fortunes have been made in the past. The 
Directors are H. A. Hayward, J. N. Gregory, Thomas Garrett, 
George Heazleton and W. B. Hamilton. The capital stock is 
$10,000. 

I % % 

THE Callustro Company is still to the fore, and the ladies are as 
determined as ever that it must be a success. They held an 
election during the week, and elected their officers for the ensuing 
year. The Board has raised by personal pledge enough money to 
send an envoy East to dispose of the property for a large sum. 

% % % 

Large interest The payment of dividends by the Sav- 

on ings Banks of this city is now going on, and 

Sauiqgs Deposits, as a rule the rate is remarkably high, rang- 
ing in one instance over five per cent, per annum on term deposits. 
It is to be hoped that this will be the last time that an induce- 
ment in the way of such high interest will be held out to de- 
positors of heavy amounts, who will then be driven to find some 
better use for their money than to lock it up in a bank vault. 
There have been deposits during the past year in some of these 
savings institutions of over $100,000 on account of separate indi- 
viduals, and in one instance a large sum realized from a sale was 
turned into a bank, although arrangements had been made to im- 
prove certain property with it, when some assurance was given 
that the annual interest to be realized would not be under 5 per 
cent. Had it not been for actions of the kind, business here would 
have been much livelier than it has been for the past twelve 
months. The banks have more money on hand cow than they 
can use to good advantage, and the chances are that they will 
before long be compelled to reduce the interest to borrowers, 
which will not permit them to pay anything like 5 percent, again 
to people who can find nothing better to do with their money 
than to board it. There should be a law here the same as in 
other places, where no savings bank is allowed to accept an in- 
dividual sum above a certain figure. This, however, will probably 
follow in due time, like the sensible change in the overdraft sys- 
tem in commercial banks, as the ideas of the community get modi- 
fied for the better by age and experience. 

I % % 

DEPOSITORS in banks are not the only ones who participate 
in the profits, and stockholders, when the business of the 
year has proved successful, are entitled to draw down a 
remuneration for the capital which they have subscribed 
as a basis for operations and as a guarantee for the safety of de- 
posits. The German Savings and Loan Society has just paid its 
stockholders $65 per share for the six months ending December 
■31, 1893, and the San Francisco Savings Union paid $15 per share 
for the same time. 

THERE have been some changes in the management of the 
Tallant Banking Company during the week, necessitated by 
the death of John McKee. Kirkham Wright has been elected to 
fill the vacancy on the Board of Directors, and John Dempster 
McKee to the position of cashier. John D. Tallant is still Presi- 
dent, and Frederick W. Tallant, formerly assistant cashier, will 
in the future act as Vice President. 



A Cf/ange The only change reported so far for the new 

of year in the local insurance world is the transfer 

Local Agents, of the New York Underwriters' Agency to 
Belden & Cofran, managers of the Pacific department of the 
Hartford Fire Insurance Company. The latter company will in 
the future guarantee all policies issued by the Underwriters' 
Agency, which has been composed of the Hanover aad Citizens 
Insurance Companies of New York. The territory included in 
the local agency consists of California, Oregon, Washington, 
Idaho and Nevada. Last year the Underwriters' Agency collected 
in premiums about $115,000, and the Hartford about $330,000. This 
transfer was anticipated in the News Letter some months ago. 

JD. BRADFORD, of the Fire Association of Philadelphia, has 
, been in town, preparatory to making an extensive trip over 
the territory of the company on this coast. 



Jan. •», 1S94 



S\\ 1 -|:\m Im <• NEWS LEI 11 K 







•■ Hear the Crier What the devil art ihonT 

"Ooe that win pIit tha devil. *tr. with yoo." 



HE bound It up in swathing cloths and a pickling solution ; 
He scented It. and seasoned it — his New Year's resolution; 
He put It in a rock-ribbed tomb, of g >o J -sense bricks constructed. 
And swore the pathway to tbe door should never be obstructed. 

Kacb day he made a pilgrimage this relic to look over, 
And each day Tell bis shoulder-blades, as hoping to discover 
Some sprouting wings, as angels wear; he felt so truly pious, 
He ordered him a snowy robe, and ordered it cut bias. 

His holy knees grew callous; a kneeling situation 

He found essential every day to save bim from temptation. 

A las! one yielding hour when thirst assailed his spougy tbrottle. 

A stranger paused before tbe shrine and pulled out a huge bottle. 

Tbe nose of tbe reformed one took in the scent delicious; 
He feebly saw a corkscrew plunged into that cork pernicious; 
He yielded — took a drink or two— and, ob, tbe woeful wonder, 
He dragged his resolution out and kicked it all asunder! 

PAT FLYNN has been fined five dollars for using profane lan- 
guage. Pat may as well understand at once that he cannot 
imprecate with impunity in a city of civil and religious liberty, 
especially if the city be burdened with a heavy municipal debt, 
which can be liquidated only by a tax on blaspheming. Pat may 
urge that the debt bad nothing to do with his swearing, and that 
he took no hand in incurring it, to which we answer that although 
two wrongs do not make a right, one wickedness may be advan- 
tageously taxed to pay for another. For example, the vice of 
intemperance is very properly made to contribute to the extinc- 
tion of a national debt caused by the expense of cutting throats. 
It is true that it is not quite so expensive to drink whisky as it 
is to cut throats, and swearing is one degree less vile than 
plundering; but then, it must be admitted that the sura of the 
angles of a triangle is two right angles, and that if every x is y 
and every p is q, then you can not make a pair of gloves out of 
a pig's tail. [At this point the Town Crier must have become so 
deeply metapoysical that he could not preserve a proper distinc- 
tion between his morality and his geometry; and, having seen 
his logic expire ingloriously in the spiral agony of a pig's tail, our 
contributor bad recourse to pure theology, and his subject became 
at once as intelligible as the second spasm of Wagner's Walkure 
and as instructive as the repentant revery of a boa constrictor 
distended to a particular thinness over the passive anatomy of a 
castiron dog. We apologize to him for the sentences we have 
been forced to omit. — Ed. News Letter ] 

AN enterprising parson has offered a prize of $200 for the best 
essay on the subject, "Why Men Don't Go to Church." In 
tbe first place, tbe sitting-room louage is more conducive to a 
comfortable sleep than the back of a pew, whatever the style of 
moulding. Some one must stay at home and take care of the 
baby. Church time comes on Sunday, and two sermons a day, 
after the usual ''Saturday night out," are too strong a dose any- 
how. He never has a new bonnet, and if he had, the natural 
viciousness of his character would make him put it on hind part 
before, just to create a scandal. He doesn't like to see the collec- 
tion plate passed around. He likes to give the parson a chance 
to have his salary raised. He is an irreligious brute altogether, 
and church time falls at the most favorable hour for a game. 
Any unoccupied Bohemian who chooses to work these sugges- 
tions into an essay will find us willing to divide the prize with 
him. 

FOUR men the other day had the assurance to attempt to ex- 
tort money from a lawyer. They failed, of course; no lawyer 
could afford to permit the establishment of a precedent contrary 
to the spirit of that venerable maxim, Interest reipublicae resjudi- 
catas non rescindi. And was not the matter of the divine right of 
extortion ages ago adjudicated in favor of the lawyer? 

MISS Marie Louise Gumaer says that the people of San Fran- 
cisco are "rude, and, I should say, uncultured." In pleas- 
ing contrast to this remark, it will be noted that tbe residents of 
this city are not saying what they think of Miss Gumaer; they 
feel that it would not show good breeding to do so. 

A MEXICAN, aged 112, died in San Diego last week from the 
effects of excessive cigarette smoking. This ought to be a 
warning to the young men who are addicted to the habit. 

THE man whose cart Chris Evans Btole says he is going to have 
the bandit arrested for grand larceny. The Town Crier re- 
cords this as the cleverest joke of the winter solstice. 

THE unhappy women are not all married to mean men. Most 
of them are not married at all. 



S\ \ S William A. Spanldlog In tbe . urreni Q&HfnuiaH TUuttmUd 
Jingnziuf •■ We shall n*V*I find the ultimata ideal of a paper 
until, on the Day of J idgmant, the Recording \ D U bli 

Mroll." Well, when Mr Gabrltl, editor of the ETrawniy 

starts forth to run (he gamut of journalism, we wish him 

hick. He must have the paid Dp lobtcrtpiloDi ol it I women 

already, ami before his paper Is published, he will have plenty of 
time In which to work up a good subscription Hat and quite a 
large advertising patronage. But the Town OMBfl can hardly 
with Brer Bpaiilding regarding Its moral tone. We think 
thai some of the articles, telling why every one except Mr. 
Spaulding, the 17.000 press reformers, and School Director Decker, 
were not admitted into Heaven, will be very racy reading. 

THE bold, bad footpad has appeared in a new light. The other 
day Yicomte George de Beugbem, of Brussels, received a 
highly-perfumed note at his Palace Hotel apartments. It was 
signed " Edith." and it asked for a meeting at the Golden Gate 
Park. The Vicomte sillied forth to keep the date, with $400 in 
his pocket, the Hush of youth and energy on his brow, and the 
prospects of an 'all-night racket" in his breast. Instead of meet- 
ing an Edith he met a footpad, who relieved him of his $400 just 
about as quickly as any Edith could have done. Tbe Vicomte 
reported the matter to the police, who said that they would » in- 
vestigate matters." What a lot of consolation this must be to a 
man who doesn't know the San Francisco police 1 

DR. DECKER and Mr. Hyde are engaging their full share of the 
attention of the public. Tbe readers ol Stevenson's remarka- 
ble book are undecided which they would rather be, and consider 
it more than strange that tbe gifted novelist foreshadowed these 
two distinguished personages. Meanwbile.it must occur to the 
most ordinary observer that the educational government of the 
city is likely to be neglected during these unseemly squabbles. 

ADVENTISTS at Battle Creek, Michigan, have decided that the 
end of the world is to arrive, according to programme, in a 
few days. And millions of long-suffering people, in these bard 
times, will lift their heads to the firmament just long enough to 
plead that it may come before tbe rent falls due again. Such a 
joke on the landlord would be appreciated by many even in the 
hoar of final dissolution. 

SCTENCE, tbe modern marplot, has unclosed her severe jaws 
to remark dispassionately that the striped stockings wherein 
tbe female of our time loves to conceal her nether charms, are 
baneful to the skin — to all which the fair San Pranciscayenne 
replies with a tranquil smile and orders another dozen pairs. For 
the sagacious creature knows that they will make it merry for 
tbe flea. 

THESE halcyon and vociferous times are bringing to the surface 
those charitable persons who surrender the reluctant nickel 
to the tramp and lose a night's rest lest the recipient may not put 
the bounty to good use. 

JOB had his boils bis soul to try, 
Sent by the dire destroyer; 
The modern test is worse than his, 
For Cleveland has Pennoyer. 

CHRISTMAS and New dear's have gone, and the remains of 
the turkey are a cheerful reminder of the pleasure of the past 
and the anguish of the present. 

MANY a girl thinks that she can do nothing without a bus- 
band, and when she does get one, finds that she can do 
nothing with him. 

A FEMALE footpad is laid to be working in the Western Ad- 
dition. She has two male assistants, but she goes through 
the pockets herself. 

EDWIN ARNOLD says that there are 30,000 "poetesses" in 
England. This raay account for his strong predeliction for 
Japan. 

NEW YEAR'S receptions are out of style, which is due to the 
fact, we think, that society made them functions instead of 
calls. 

THE increased duty on cigars and whisky does not signify, by 
any means, that one should increase his duty to use them. 

THE Sbah of Persia, it is said, has a pipe worth $40,000. It 
would not be prudent for the Shah to let that pipe go out. 

IF the reported blood-thirstiness of the Queen of the Hawaiian 
Islands is really true, she must be something of a tiger Lili. 

ARIZONA has a new game of chance. A holds the cards and 
B holds a revolver. The coroner holds an inqaest. 

DID you ever see a justice of the peace who was so meek that 
he did not like to be called a judge? 

THE poor, thin, but fortunate turkey which escaped the holi- 
days wears a happy smile just now. 

THE long hair of the football player may cover a multitude of 
crank ideas. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Jan. 6, 1894. 



TTHE news from Brazil since tl^el^moT^bTokfi „„, , k „ u 

to restoring the discarded empire. With thai enoMn X aS W , 

went with which they were in touch and sympathT AH^h"" 
nonsense has been put in circulation for the purpose of 'infln L 
and agitating the American mind, and if possible hri„ £ 

a pressure of public opinion to e f ' n ' B 8S " Cb 

would compel it to interfere on behalf of ..the ^T^'V 5 
there is not and never was a repubUc „ U i T " " C ' B "' 

must have behi/d ^a? g P e e S ,e , m e n nts°of t ' 8 :ren g r ^ *°™™^ 
wo^o^T^syK S^lT^ll ■*&*»■ * 

address, ..can save France" om^k?" 7, ' D bi3 ' ast electoral 

-^^HSH- of-^e-e^ic^ 
ters of public policy But fhj „ greed Upou a " "semia! mat- 
deceptive and^n sleadfng Thei^r"^ 6 ^"? 3 ° Ul <° have been 
before the Dupuy min isfrv w„, n f b „" had Scaroely convened 
Perier ministry, w h"ch succeed U ° V'. a " d ' be Casimir - 

very threshold oMt official c„rel' CaPed the 3au)e fate ' at tb * 
The narroMea, tt™ sc '7r,; ( ° y " 7 th . e SkiD of its teeth - 
ndence of the Chambers and nf^» necessar "y weaken the con- 
of the new combination of offi ial ve? hVh lhefutu y e P™pec,s 
feat is about as ninnh »,.„-••' y e bare avoidance of de- 

at the present ime could ho 7 neT lS , lr7 thSt C0Uld be ^ together 
that is moved by the auctions, °™ *, Cbamber of Deputies 
question on which the OamirPe r r P r r ■'■ V" PreSent 0ne - Tbe 
borsed was a demand for a «nem an-nlT', 7 Wa9 S ° Dearly UD " 
been convic.ed of political offense "?", 3 ' 7 f ° r persons wh ° bad 
connection with labor strikes Th» V ot ° ffense3 committed in 
cal Gransset, an ex-coramun st and w^H W ° S raiSed by M ' Pas " 
ter; yet it was only defied \yTZu otT^Z^ ^ ^ 



I If you look at a dozen com- 
mon lamp-chimneys, and then 
at Macbeth's "pearl top" or 
''pearl glass," you will see 
the differences— all but one— 
they break from heat ; these 
don't ; you can't see that. 

Common glass is misty, milky dtls( 
•an', see through it; Macbeth's is clear 

Pittsburgh. _ Geo . a . Macbeth Cq 

, D NOyfElMSSESSMENfT 

Location of principal n^^if V inin 3 Company 
'^&;l?fiS^^^^8SEr* B F ~o,Cal. Location of 

twenty five Cents per share wm leTiVd ??i n au . k asscssmtnt . »o 1 of 

secretary, at the office of the comnanv p„„ „. V?' cs Gold coin, to the 
gomery St.. San Francisco, Cal Py ' Koom 49 ' Ne vada Block, 303 Mont 

fore will be sold on jnfflmy ■??. ; a ,'l?, u " les8 Parment Is made be- 
pay tbe delinquent assessment together with i d . ay ?' February. m% to 
peases of sale. By order of the Bofrd of Direct ° f adTertisi "B and ex 

Office-Room 49, Nevada block No 3(M mw B ' H0L MES. Secrefry. 
Cisc o, Cal. ulul " K ' "°- ™» Montgomery street, San Fran- 

ASS ESSMENTHllofiCE 

Lpcat,„n M o?^fn a c? p S° p 1 ,^S, d bns!n'eTs liS'S" ^^ 
cation f works-Virginia Cit ? Mining Dtolt?, f^acisco. California. Lo- 
the «Sh la H hereb 7 e*«n that a\ a meeting of ne ' BoaSf C f °,! ut5 '', NeTa < 1 >- 
tne 16th day of December is« an . oard of ^t rectors, held on 

P r m sb f re ,'T a ^ lCTi « d "P™atbe Stlf .f'f^S' Wo - 43 > of 25 cents 
immediately in United state- : Gold Coin f^K °I the corporation, payable 

Syrian SJflfi^^WWS ^ fif^ 

of sale. By order of the B^ard of D.^recmrs advertl «"g and expenses 

oSffiSa?^ N - ada B1 °ok, 30 9 M H o^g^ 8 erfs?r L eel°Ian Se S^co, 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



IndiaVarcorcluded^^^aranfa' 11 " '•'„ g"— a «' «f British 
istan. British statesmen hale or ?' W " b '"" Ameer ol Af S ba "- 
an alliance as a nece^itv in L 9 tlme pa,t yarded such 

tion in the FMtoS&SkS^V- °' f™'*'* ° eW posi - 
a buffer State, Mahom d in n religion 1 i'V'^ 1 ' he er ' ction of 
influences, between the presen oatoLf- f d r' n u ated by Brkish 
in Asia and the frontier Tne o( Bri?s b India A *T"? E ' Upire 
says in regard to this matter that il. • , \ Rasslan Paper 
Uahomedan East is beginning in J P oa '"on of affairs in our 
ter," and that .. we may SO o„ expec falTV, tbreat ^ in e obarac- 
condictsin our frontier region " r. Jt n J?l ° l UD P |e asant 
rence of these conflicts wflfaU depend unon added tbat the occur- 
ence of Russian aggressio. P P ° a tbe absence or pres- 



Location of Princim| h n w« r ,.f M .. lni . n8 Com Pan'y. 

c Sc^is3S!af"^^™- LCisco,ca,iforaia - L °- 

stock „? the eo^oSfonfpaya h STmSed'iaVe'lV ffiZ-fifF 0f lb * ca P " 
to the secretary, at the office of th^"" 1 "" UlJlt ed States Gold Coin 

Montgomery street, San Fraicfsco Ca? P 7 " roomn ' Nevada Block, S 

i:r ,r ich this s&Sk ^ re.™ „ ap-d on 

and adveSd 3 '' or'sale^Vr"^ ,89 - 4 - """ be ««C^. 
made before, will be sold VtuesDAY Th^ a H d ,«ole S s payment is 
ISM, to pay the delinquent assessment .il'..,' 116 h ,\V b da 5 r of February, 
fsing and expenses „ q f X^irA^X^^L^Z 01 "^^ 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

LocaSo^oTprfncip^^acfolbusfni'r^ M i nin 9 Company. 
W No k ti7^- 0ld % Sto a e P cSunt £ y Nevada FraUcls00 ' Cal ^c-ation of 

thSwS day e o e f b D !cIm , U e h r at i a S U a mee " ne 0f the Board «' Wetor. held on 
per shari was levied nnV„l 93 ' an assessment (No. 63) of Twenty fvm. 

|"^ediatairinUnU?dZte h s e goTco\a to t? t h ii he ooipora^^Swl 
the company, room 35, third ll„ ur MHK 'b.Thh- 6 Se g reta ly. at the office of 

Any stock upon which this assessment^. 11 i°S S " U F ™ciseo, Cal. 
ruesdav the 1R( . u „ a!lSe f sment shall remain unpaid on 

and advertised for sale at Duhf ( V a ""?- ry - t894 - W|M be ^""Quent. 
before, will be sold I on TvliuA TbTk^ / nles ? Ea™ent'i 6 made 
pay the delinquent assessment together tfth da ? of February, 18S4, to 
expenses of sale. By order of' thTIoaM of Directers ' advertlsia e *°i 
-^^ Ce -=^^HJ^thinl lo o Ii ^^ 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Location of p^Pnciof fol,?, ^r' l er - Minio S Company 
° No?i r e k e S r G H° l5 PB&SwOomS'SSKS?" F " noIa <«>. Cal. Location 

Per share, wa- f levied fmnn th„ i ' *•? ass c ssm eut (No. 24) of twenty-five cts 
immediately iuUnHe,S?a,s.„ C l ap !.' a i 1 ,, Soc . k K of D the corporation payable 
the company, 4M California ,1n" ff « .'J° ttt ? Se cretary, at the office if 
Any stock upon which thi?»" ' bau f ■'aueisco, California. 

' uesday. the TWieth Da, „i i? eU s fo« !i emaia un P ai<J oa 
and advertised for sale at ^nubfir i, „, Uar '- '? 94 ' ,""' be delinquent, 

^c^^foVnla^eSSnS:: ' ^'S^ l~y° f 



Jan. 6, 1894. 



KK VNCI& NEWS LETTER, 



ifi 



LONDON NOTES- 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



A DEPUTATION from Ibe Mam*** I.tw Reform A%ioclfttlon. 
which waited upon the Lord Advoomta «t lb* Scotch Ofl 

\r. DeMDbtr .1. raided a norel point In conncciion with 
the Knglifb and Scotch law U lo marriage with a dco«M*d wife's 
sitter. Their object was to obtain from bis lordship an opinion 
upon an assumption that persons desiring to contract Mich mar- 
riages might go to BootUnd for that purpose without incurring 
ol such marriages being held unlawful. Dr. Banter, 
M P., introduced the deputation. Mr. T. Paynter Allen sai.i that 
the association, of wbicb he was ic retftry, had been advising 
persons, who de?ired lo contract inch marriage?, and who applied 
to the association for advice, that they would be running no ser- 
ious risk by contracting the marriage in Scotland. They had 
taken tbat course, believing that the Scotch law permitted such 
marriages. The Lord Advocate, in reply, said be gathered that 
the object of the association was to promote an amendment of the 
law as to marriage with a deceased wife's sister. He was entirely 
In favor of that change, and bad voted for it in Parliament more 
than once. But he was not able to assent to what bad been said 
as to what the law of Scotland was at this moment upon the sub- 
ject. He had no serious doubt tbat Mich marriages were by tbe 
exis'ing law of Scotland illegal, and that by that law tbe offspring 
would be illegitimate. Any one concerned with the administra- 
tion of tbe law must take the law as he found it, and as it bad 
been laid down. Therefore, the efforts of tbe society should 
rather be directed to getting the law changed by Parliament than 
to dealing with tbe matter in any other way. He was not aware 
that any serions doubt prevailed in Scotland about the matter, 
and that being bis view, he was bound to say tbat a somewhat 
grave responsibility rested on any one who advised persons to go 
from England to Scotland for the purpose of contracting such 
marriages. 

Professor Garner, tbe American scientist who went to .Africa 
to study the language of the ape, brought back with him two 
very 6ne specimens of the chimpanzee, which he has left in the 
keepiDg of Mr. William Cross, the naturalist, of Liverpool, since 
bis arrival. The names given by tbe Professor to his anthropoid 
friends were Aaron and Eiishaba, and, much to his regret, Elish- 
aba last week fell a victim to the severe English weather. She 
bad several previous attacks of cold and got better. Death was 
attributed to a pulmony affection brought on by a chill. The 
brain of the little victim has been given to Professor Herdman, 
of the Liverpool University College, while the body is to be pre- 
served. The scene of the deathbed of Eiishaba was one of a very 
distressing kind. She really died in the arms of poor Aaron, who 
had been most assiduous in his atteniions to bis consort during 
the whole of her illness. Professor Garner was present during 
the last moments of the chimpanzee, and when he put his hand 
to her heart to see if it bad ceased to beat, Aaron put his band 
there too, looking up in the Professor's eyes as if inquiring if 
that was ail they could do for her. Aaron would not permit his 
dead companion to be taken from bim, and clung to her body 
with such tenacity tbat the Professor was compelled to lay it 
down on its bed of straw, when tbe distressed survivor released 
its hold. The sadness depicted on Aaron's countenance could not 
have been clearer portrayed on the face of any human being, and 
his grief was unconsolable. When Professor Garner visited his 
protege a state of gloom still surrounded tbe cage, and poor Aaron 
was not consoled until he had bis band in that of the Professor, 
and by signs and sounds was telling him of his distiess. Both 
of the animals bad become greacly attached to Professor Garner, 
and apart from her value in support of his theory, tbe loss of 
Eiishaba is keenly felt by him. 

Lady Mabel Sievier, wife of R. 8. Sievier, and only sister of the 
Marquis of Ailesbury, bas brought an action against James Cros- 
by to recover a number of love letters written by her to Mr. 
Crosby prior to her marriage to Mr. Sievier. Justice Hawkins 
decided that Lady Mabel has no right to recover the letters. Tbe 
defendant was justified in holding them in view of her imputa- 
tion that Mr. Crosby had tried to marry her for her money. 

The hereditary throat-trouble, wbicb is fast reducing the Prin- 
cess of Wales to the stone-deaf condition of her mother, tbe Queen 
of Denmark, bas made its appearance in tbe Princess Maud of 
Wales, whose weakness of the throat will.it is feared, impair her 
bearing. 

Imitators and Impostors. 

The unequalled success of Allcock's Porous Plasters as an ex- 
ternal remedy, has induced unscrupulous parties to offer imitations, 
which they endeavor to sell on the reputation of Allcock's. It is an 
absurdity to speak of them in the same category as the genuine por- 
ous plaster. Their alleged equality with Allcock's is a false pretense. 

The ablest medical practitioners and chemists and thousands of 
grateful patients unite in declaring Allcock's Porous Plasters the 
best external remedy ever produced. Ask for Allcock's, and accept 
no other. 

Brandreth's Pills act upon the whole system. 



Coliforniu Savlnoa And t_oi»n Society. 
Forthehalt year i » dividend ha» tx 

riarcd atine ratcnf , r milium on Term Deposit* and 

four and nii«.»ixih i tper annum on Ordinary Deporlu. free 

Of toxoa, payable ou and ■ \ Y. J«inmry j 1891 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Saving. Bunk. 
DlTlajDdi on Term Deposits «t the r»teo< Ova [5) pot oenl per annum 

Ordinary Dep rtto of four and i-elitb M ft pi 

per annum, for the half year ending Dec. 81, 1898, frei will be 

payable mi aud aft. -: S. L. ABBOT, JR., Secretary 

-■;. I: _!__!__ 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 

Tlie German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half-year ending Dec. 81, 1KD3, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five aud one-tenth IB 110) percent, per annum nu term deposits 
and four and one fourth I r , per cent, per annum ou ordinary deposit- pay- 
able on and after Tuesday, January 2, 1894. 

OfflCQ-626 California street. ° E ° TO0RNY ' S ^'"^ 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 

Savings and Loan Society, 

For the six months ending Dec. 31, 1893, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of Ave (b) per cent pur auuiim on Term Deposits, aud four and 

one-sixth (4 1-6) per cent per annum ou Ordinary Deposits, payable ou aud 

after Tuesday, January 2, 189;;. 

.„ „ , CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office— 101 Montgome ry street, corner Sutter. 

DmOEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco, 
For the half year ending with Dec. 31, 1893, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five per cent, per annum on Term Deposits aud four and one 
sixth <4 1-C) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes 
payable on and after Tuesday, January 2, 1894. 

GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 
Offic e— 3 3 Post Stree t , San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings anrl Loan Society. 

San Francisco, December 30, 1893. 
At a regular meeting of the board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate oE four aud one-quarter {4%) 
per cent per annum on all deposits for the six mouths ending Dec. 31, 1893, 
free from all taxes, aud payable ou aud after January 2, 1894 

R J. TOB1N, Secretary. 
Office— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Street 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 
For the half year ending Dec. 31, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five per cent, per annum ou term deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-6) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on aud after Tuesday, January 2, 1894. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 
Office— 326 California street, corner Sauscme. Branch— 1700 Market St., 
corner Polk. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Peoples Home Savings Bank. 

The regular annual meeting of the Stockholders of the Peoples Home 

Savings Uauk will be held at the office of the Bank, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday, the E ghth Day of January, 1894, at 1 o'clock P. M„ 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Dir ctors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. EMIL B. HERMANN, Secretary. 

Office— 805 Market street, San Francisco, Cal- 

ANNUAL MEETIN3. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company, 
Tbe regular annual meeting of the stockholders of tae Sierra Nevada 
Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 
room 15, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal,, ou 
Wednesday, th? 17th day of January, 1894, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year, aud the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Saturday, January 13, 1894, at the 
hour of 12 o'clock M. E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 

Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, 303 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Pajaro Valley Railroad. Company, 
The regular annual meeting of tbe stockholders of the Pajaro Valley 
Railroad Company will be held at the office of the company, 327 
Market street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday, the 16th r av of January, 1894. at the hour of 11 O'clock A. iV. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, aud for the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close ou Thursday, January 4, 1894, at 3 
o'clock P. h. . E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 
Office— 327 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Kentuek Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. S 

Amount per Share 10 cents 

Levied Dec. 20, 1893 

Delinquent in Office Jan. 24, 18S4 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock Feb. 15, 1894 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

FRANK KENNEDY, LAW-OFFICE, ROOM 66, MURPHY BUILDING, 
(Third floor), 1236 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 6, 1894. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour is steady; Extras, $3.50@S3.GO. Superfine, $2.40@$2 60. 

Wheat is light; Shipping, U.05; Milling, tl.05»*1.10 per cental. 

Barley is slack; Brewing, 80c.@90c. Feed. 70c.@72>4c. per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, »1.123tl.l5; Feed, $1,053*1.10 per ctl. 

Corn, White, 85c. ; Yellow, 85e.@90e. per ctl. 

Rye is quiet, fair demand, $1 02%. Cemeut. $2.00@$2.2=i 

Hay is steady; Wheat, $10@J14; Oats, $10@$12; Alfalfa, ?8@$10. 

Millstuffs, good demand. Bran, $1(',@|17 per ton. 

Beans, light request, tl.65@$2.10 per ctl. Potatoes, 4)c.@75c. per ctl 

Butter is higher; Choice, 30c.@35c. ; Fair, 17c.@18c. 

Cheese, light stock, 10c.@13c. Eggs, free supply, 35c.@40c. 

Honey, Comb, 10c.@12c. : Extracted, 4c.@5c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth J1.05@JL 20. Beeswax is steady, at 22o.@23c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Hides are steady; Dry, 5c.@6c. Wool is in light demand at 7c.@12c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 7^c. 

Coffee sluggish at 20c.@22c. for C. A. Cauned Fruits of alfkinds in favor. 

Coal is plentiful; large stock. Nuts flud ready sale. Hops, 16c.(B18!^c. 

Quicksilver is nominal at ?31 per flask. 

8ugar, good stocx of both Raws and Refined. White, 4%e.(96c. 

The Quicksilver market of late has experienced a decided set- 
back, even in the face of unusually large exports to China; in 
fact, several large invoices were placed at $30 per flask against 
the long ruling market rate of $41. Owing to the low price of 
silver, it is thought that the production of Quicksilver will be 
greatly lessened, and that holders will be anxious to close out 
their stock even at the present low price. 

The Wool market is dull and prices more or less nominal. 

The Fruit market is now abundantly supplied with oranges of 
large and superior quality; apples and other deciduous fruit9 are 
in full supply, selling at low prices. 

The Pacific Mail steamer City of Rio de Janeiro sailed for the 
Orient on the 30th alt., carrying in Treasure $188,575, which is a 
very light shipment. Of this $51,375 went to Hongkong, $50,500 
to Shanghae, and $86,700 to Japan, all silver with the exception 
of $3180. For cargo this steamer carried to China 5302 bbls. 
Flour, 500 fliks. of Quicksilver. 134 pkgs. Machinery, etc., value 
$38,000; to Japan, 1601 bbls. Flour, 135 rolls Leather, etc., value 
$14,681; elsewhere, 100 cs. Canned Goods. 

Tahiti.— The bktne. Tropic Bird, hence on the 30th ult., carried 
1358 bbls. Flour, 22,847 lbs. Sugar and a full cargo of produce. 

The stair. Progresso, of the N. A. N. Co., from the Isthmus and 
way ports, had a large New York cargo of Dry Goods and other 
Mdse., and from Central America, 1572 bags Coffee and 160 bags 
Sugar. 

The P. M. 8. S. Colon, from the l9thmus and way ports, had 
2073 bags Coffee from Central and South America, 223 pkgs. 
Sugar, 50 logs Mahogany, etc.; and from Mexico, 300 sks. Coffee, 
759 sks. Ore, 592 bxs. Limes, 63 pkgs. Treasure; value $81,549. 

For Mexico — The steamer St. Paul, hence on the 28th ult., car- 
ried in treasure to Mexico $1300, and for cargo 100 flsks. Quick- 
silver and Mdse., value $16,675. 

The steamer San Jose, for Central America, carried in treasure 
$12,000, and for cargo mdse. valued at $56,000; also, to Mexico, 
mdse., value $3395. 

The Orient.— The O. & O. 8. 8. Gaelic, 22 days from Hongkong, 
via Yokohama 14 days, had for cargo 33,643 mats Rice, 2921 
pkgs. Tea, 1017 pkgs. Oil, 3740 pkgs. Sugar, 43 pkgs. Silk: Goods, 
2120 rolls Matting, 814 bxs. Mikado Oranges, and 8000 pkgs. 
Mdse.; for Overland, 12.061 pkgs. Tea, 1097 pkgs. Raw Silk, 112 
pkgs. Straw Braid, 47 pkgs.[Silk Goods, 745 rolls Matting, 298 pkgs. 
Curios, etc.; for Central and South America, 30 pkgs. Silk Goods 
and 130 pkgs. Mdse. 

A Salt Cargo — The German ship Reinbeck, 117 days from Tra- 
pani, has 1850 tons Salt to J. W. Grace AS Co. 

Grain Charters — Br. ship Royal Forth, 2088 tons, Wheat from 
Taconia to Cork, U. K., Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk, £1 lis. 3d , 
direct port £1 8s. 9d. ; option, San Francisco loading, orders £1 
3s. 9d., direct port £1 Is. 3d. Ship Santa Clara, 1171 tons, now 
on the Columbia, Wheat thence to Cork, D. K., Havre, Antwerp 
or Dunkirk, £1 10s., direct port £1 8s., chartered prior to arrival. 

Spot grain freight rates are nominal at 23s. 9J. (g) 25s. for Cork, 
U. K. and Continent. At this writing there are in port fourteen 
free ships, say 27,500 tons, suited to the grain carrying trade. 

Business at present is very slack, leading merchants taking 
stock account preparatory to the spring trade. 

There have been few changes in the several businesses, fewer 
than usual at this season of the year. 



It is delightful for ladies who are shopping, or who want a delicious 
and wholesome change from home cooking, to have such an estab- 
lishment as the Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street, to drop 
into for a luncheon prepared by the most expert cooks. The service 
at the famous family restaurant is perfect— no waiters could be more 
attentive, no restaurant cleaner. 



.,£ or , Br , on « h ' aI ' Asthmatic and Pulmonary complaints. 

Browns Bronchial Troches" have remarkable curative properties. Sold 
only m boxes. 



B-A-zrsriKis. 



* SAN FRANCJSCFSAVINGS UNION. 

Nort lieaxi Corner California and Sansome Streets, 

Formerly Occupied by Bank of Wells, Fargo & Co. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk 

Deposits, June 30, 1893 $28,058 691 OO 

Uuarantee Capital and Surplus 1,099,434 OO 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, president; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremerr' 
George C. Boardman, J. Q. Eastland ; Lovell White, Cashier 

Receives DepositB, and Loans onlyon real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
01 the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge Is made 
for pass b °ok or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. M. Saturday 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST GO. 

Paid-up Capital, $1,000,000. 

Corner Montuomery and California Streets, San Francisco. 

J. D. FRY, President HENRY WILLIAMS, Vice-President 

J. Dalzell Brown. Secretary and Treasurer. 

This company is authorized by law to act as Executor, Administrator 
Assignee, Receiver or Trustee. It is a legal depositary for Court and Trust 
Funds. Will take entire charge of Real and Personal Estates, collecting 
the income and profits, and attending to all such details as fiu individual 
in like capacity could do. 

Acts as Registrar and Transfer Agent of all Stocks and Bonds 

Receives deposits subject to check and allows interest at the rate of two 
per cent per annum on daily balances. Issues certificates of deposits 
bearing fixed rates of interest. u»i»ua»i.» 

Receives deposits in its savings department from »1 upwards, and allows 
the usual rate-, of interest thereon. 

£*' mte «f interest on Term Deposits for six months, ending June 30, 
1893, was at 5 per cent per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits i 1-6 per 
cent per annum. ^ 

RENTS SAFES' inside its burglar-proof vaults at prices from $5 per 
annum upwardB, according to size. Valuables of all kinds may be stored 
at low rates. 

WILLS DRAWS AND TAKEN CARE OP WITHOUT CHARGE. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

CAPITAL PAW W In00 f PO ! ttted . b . yR T!. Charter : 1862 -.... $3 000 000 

RESERVE FUND 7,390,000 

Southeastcomer Bush and Sansome Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE 60 LOMBARD 8TREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES-Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops. Nanaimo 
and Nelson-British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Tacoma 
Washington. ' 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all partB of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows- 

NEW YORK— Merchants Bank of Canada; CHICAGO-First National 
Bank; LIVERPOOL-North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND-British 
Linen Company ; IRELAND-Bank of Ireland ; MEXICO-London Bank of 
n£?i?? ; S °, 0T £ AMERICA-London Bank of Mexico and South America; 
95iS^A n r d , JAPAN-chartered Bank ol India, Australia and China; 
AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND-Bank of Australasia and Commer- 
cial Banking Company of Sydney, Ld. ; DEMERARA and TRINIDAD 
(West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 



c* itai BANK 0F CALIF(1RNI *' SAN FRANCISCO. 

snipina m* unaj^d'if^t.7j^'i:'i8»)V.v"::.':.":'.:: 'I'm'SsBeo 

WM. ALVORD, President. ' ' " " 

i H Pr™™s«;t„' s -;-Cashler | 1. F. Moulton, 2d Assistant Cashier. 
B. Prentiss Smith, Asst. Cashier. 

™,„„„ „ CORRESPONDENTS : 

NEW YORK— Agency of The Bank of California. BOSTON-Tremont 
National Bank. LONDON-Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. PARI8- 
Messrs. De Rothschild Freres. VIRGINIA CITY (NEv.)-Agency of The 
Bank of California. CHICAGO-Union National Bank. ST. LOUIS-Boat- 
"htMa a , a , k o . 6 DS ^AJ; IA AND NEW ZEALAND-Bank of New Zealand. 
CHINA, JAPAN and INDIA-Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China 
Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world 
Draws direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake. 
Denver. Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen Stock- 
holm . Chnstiania, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai 
Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. ' 

LONDON ANTSAN FRANCISCO BANK. Limited. 

Authorized Capital J3,500,0O0 I Capital paid up 2.450 000 

Rsserve ... *49o'noo 

San Francisco Office, 424 California SI. I London Office: '. '. '. '. 73 Lombard St EC 

Portland Branch. 48 First St. Tacoma Branch, 1166 Pacific Avenue. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GU8TAV FRIEDERICH. 

Mffw N ? ^ BA ^ ,KEE t Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
N S W , Y E K-Drexel, Morgan 4 Co. BOSTON-Third National Bank. 
.1 . s S, . iB vrep&rei to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ej- 
anwta oYtne 8 wo n rld 0n<10n and San Franclsc0 ' and between said cttieBand 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 Calllornli street. San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RE8ERVE FUND ( 1,726,000 OO 

Deposits July I, 1893. ... Si, 428, 984 37 

Officers— President, BDW. KRU8P ; Vice-President, B. A. BECKER- 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant CaBhler, WM. HERRMANN; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. MULLER. Board of Directors-Edw. Kruse, George H 
Eggers, O. Schoemann. F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H l' 
Simon, lg:i. stemhart, Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 



Jan. 6, 18M. 



SAN ri;.vN« BOO NEWS Li. I U.K. 



17 




LIVE WHILE YOU 



LIVE.— Fitegerald's Translation of Omar 



I80MKTIMKS think that never blows so red 
The rose as where some buried Cceiar bleil ; 
That every hyacinth the garden wears 
Dropped In her lap Troru some once lovely head. 

And this reviving berb, whose tender green 
Kledges the river lip on which we lean — 

Ah, lean upon it lightly, for who knows 
From what once lovely lip it springs nnseen ? 

Ah, ruy beloved, fill the cup that cheers 
To-day of past regret and future fears; 
To-morrow! Why, to-morrow I may be 

Myself with yesterday's seven thousand years. 

For some we loved, the loveliest and the best 
That from his vintage rolling Time has prest, 

Have drunk tbeir cup a round or two before, 
And one by one crept silently to rest. 

And we, that now make merry in the room 
They left, and summer dresses in new bloom, 

Ourselves must we beneath the couch of earth 
Descend — ourselves to make a couch — for whom ? 

Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend, 
Before we, too, into the dust descend! 

Dust unto dust, and under dust to lie, 
Sans wine, sans song, sans singer, and sans end! 



SOME DAY.— Lucy R. Fleming. 



"They'll alt come back again," she said, 

That bygone summer day, 
That while we watched the goodly ships 

Upon the placid bay. 
" They sail so far, they sail so fast, upon their shin- 
ing way, 
But they will come again, I know, some — some 
other day." 

Some day! So many a watcher sighs, 

When wind-swept waters moan, 
With tears pressed back, still strives to dream 

Of the glad coming home. 
Good ships sail on o'er angry waves, 'neath skies all 

tempest gray, 
For quivering lips so bravely tell, "They'll come 
again — some day." 

Some dayl We say it o'er and o'er 

To cheat our hearts, the while 
We send our cherished ventures forth, 

Perchance with sob or smile; 
And tides run on, or life ebbs fast away, 
And yet with straining eyes we watch for that 
sweet myth — some day! 

Full many a true and heart-sped bark 

May harbor find no more, 
But Hope her beacon light will trim 

For watchers on the shore; 
And those who bide at home and those upon the 

watery way, 
In toil or wasting, still report, "Someday — some 
blessed day ! " 



FOR A FAIR LADY'S BIRTHDAY.— John Danyel (1606). 



Time, cruel Time, canst thou subdue that brow 

That conquers all but thee, and thee too stays, 

As if she were exempt from scythe or bow, 
From love and years, unsubject to decays? 

Or art thou grown in league with those fair eyes 
That they might help thee to consume our days ? 

Or dost thou love her for her cruelties, 

Baing merciless like thee, that no man weighs ? 

Then do so still, although she makes no 'ateem 
OE days nor years, but lets them run in vain; 

Hold still thy swift-wing'd hours, that wond'ring seem 
To gaze on her, even to turn back again. 

And do so still, although she nothing cares; 

Do as I do, love her although unkind; 
Hold still, yet 0! I fear at unawares 

Thou wilt beguile her though thou seem'st so kind. 



WAJSTKS. 



WELLS, FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

v »:. Corner Niumomp mill Nutter Streetn. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $6,250,000 00 



John J. Valrntin 



President. 



Geo. A. Low, 
N. Van Bergen, 
Thomas Jennings, 



H,„ ' - iu it un i- 

V , i\ r '.\?° KT " Cashier. 

r.I»JiIPMA» Assistant Cashier. 

Haw York Cllj H. B. PARSONS, Cashier. 

baltLakot.lt>- J. E. DOOLY, Cashier. 

HI RECTORS : 
John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney. Oliver Eldridge, Henry E. Hunting- 
ton. Homer 3. KiuR, Geo. E. Gray, Johu J. McCook, Chas. F. Crocker, 
Dudley Evans. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

S. W. Corner Samome and Hush streets. 

Established 1870. n a DeDOsltarv 

CAPITAHPAID UP) 11 MO 600 

i U S P y!?i»^; $700.0001 UNDIVIDED PROFITS. '.'.'..'.'.'. »'l8B,'oOO 

8-«;MDRJ?HY President I E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFPITT.. Vice-President I GEO. W. KLINE Ass'tCashler 

DIRECTORS: 

George C. Perkins, S. G. Murphy, 

James D. Phelan, James Moffltt. 

John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 
P*FE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT. 
JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 
Sates to rent from ?5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 
the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
Btorage. A specialty made of thecareof wills. Office honrs,8A. M .to6r.M. 

„ p MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. 

„ „ OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES D. PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY.'.'.'. .'.'.'". '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '.'.Vice-Presidents 
Directors — James G. Fair, Edward Barron, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James D. Phelan, James Momtt, 3. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader 
and Frank J. Sullivan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary DepositB. Loans on Approved 
securities. GEO. A. STORY, CasMer. 

Deponts may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK. Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized J6,000,ooo I Paid up 11 600 000 

Subscribed 8,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700 000 

Head Office— 3 Angel t ourt, London, E. C. 
AgentB at New York— J. & W. Seli man & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking lusineBS, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issueB letters of credit available throughout the 
worlu. 3ends bills for collection, loans money, .buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. ign. STEINHART | „„„ 

P.N.LILIENTHAL.I Managers 
A. L. SELIGMAN, Cashier. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. w. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Sibscribal Capital! $2,500,010 \ Pali Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $760,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Asentb— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.).No. 10WallSt.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres 4 Cie,17Boule 
vard Polssoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
merclal and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBATJM, I „„„„„„„ 
C. ALTSCHUL, 1 Managers. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital Sl.250.000, 

Successor to Sathee & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 
JAMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. L. I. COWGILL, Cashier. 

IMrectors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, "^m. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes <fe Co. 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 



222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS: 

William Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin A. K. P. Harmon, 

Adam Grant W.S. Jones J. B. Randol. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL 31,000.000. 

OIRECT0R8 : 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. B. POND. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN VICE-PEESIDEHT. 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashieb 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY- 

No. IS Geary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November 24. 1869 



ADOLPH C. WEBER. 



President | ERNST BRAND Secretary 



18 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan 6, 1894. 




SOME time ago the London Graphic was exercised over the 
question, " Should ladies ride astride? "and now, as far as 
regards riding a bicycle, French ladies are answering the question 
in the affirmative. In the Bois de Boulogne the " bicyclettistes " 
and tbeir knickerbocker suits are becoming quite an ordinary 
sight. Thi9 autumn no sooner bad the casino closed at one of 
the Normandy watering-places than a family party, riding on 
bicycles and attended by a stalwart young professional, invaded 
the almost deserted place, along tbe paths of which they rode for 
a couple of hours every morning. Papa rode first, dressed in an 
English tweed suit with breeches and deerstalker cap. Then came 
madame, riding on a " bicyclette," wearing a short Eton jacket, 
adorned with brass buttons, very full brown cloth knickerbockers, 
ailk stockings and low shoes. She wore a man's pink cotton shirt 
and a flat black bat with a white veil and was usually supported 
into the saddle by the professional, though she could ride very 
well by herself when once started. Bebe brought up the rear on 
a little tricycle dressed in a Norfolk jacket, a very scanty skirt 
and black cotton tightR. Several girls were attached to the party 
and practiced in various costumes under the protection of madame. 
Two of them wore skirts over their cloth knickerbockers, but 
these skirts always got in the way and worked up in the most 
ungraceful fashion. When the recalcitrant skirt had wriggled up 
well above its wearer's knees the girl invariably tried to push it 
down with one hand, with tbe result that she usually went head 
first on to the grass. Another girl of about fifteen, who occasion- 
ally rode, was much wiser. She imitated madame and wore a 
boyish blue serge knickerbocker suit with a loose blouse instead 
of a jacket and waiat-coat. She was an admirable rider and man- 
aged her machine with the greatest ease. Another capital rider 
was a girl of about eighteen, who looked as if she had stepped 
out of a burlesque. Her costume was rather like Bebe's, for her 
skirt did not reach to her knees, and she wore black silk tights, 
with high buff boots. It was a most admirable costume for rid- 
ing on a " bicyclette," but it would not suit all figures. After 
several days' study of tbe subject, and with every opportunity 
for arriving at a judgment, it must be confessed that though slim 
young girls look charming in tbeir knickerbocker suits, the cos- 
tume does but emphasize the outlines of ladies with a tendency 
to stoutness. 

A society young woman of Buffalo has devised a novel enter- 
tainment, which is shortly to be made public. It is to be a re- 
ception for people who can't sleep at night. Among her friends, 
she says, are a great many very delightful people who are troubled 
with insomnia, and who confess that they spend many frightful, 
wakefnl hours walking tbe floor, looking out of the window, 
rocking in easy chairs, trying to read or write, and in other use- 
less and tiresome occupations. When her plans are fully matured 
thiB original young woman intends, on at least* two nights in 
every week, to be at home to those distressed female friends from 
midnight until morning. The guests are requested to appear in 
any unique, respectable bedroom gown, bath robes not excluded; 
the lights are to be dim, soothing music and stupid conversation 
will be tbe only diversions permitted, hot chocolate and light 
wafers will be served, couches and easy chairs will be provided in 
abundance, and tbe insomnia victims are earnestly desired to fall 
asleep as soon as possible. It is whispered that prizes will be 
offered for tbe first snore, but this detail is not authentically an- 
nounced. The reception is to be a fact, however, and an eager 
expectancy as to invitations is in the air. 



To the World's Fair ! 
Are you going ? If so, it will be to your interest to call on or write 
to the undersigned before arranging for your trip. The SANTA FE 
ROUTE is the only line under one management from California to 
Chicago. The only line running Pullman Palace and tourist sleep- 
ing cars through to Chicago on the same train every day without 
change. Personally conducted excursions through to Boston leave 
everv Tuesday. W. A. BISSELL, 650 Market street, "Chronicle" 
Building, San Francisco. 

Stcedman's Soothing Powders successfully used for children, dur- 
ing the teething period, for over fifty years. 



FACIAL BLEMISHES. 

'I be largest Institution In tbe 
world for tne treatment of the 
{ Skin, Scalp, Nerves and Blood, 
removal of Moles, Warts, Pim- 
I p'es, FreekleVran, Red Veins,- 
perfluons Hair, Powderand 
'i h Mark", andall Skin imper- 
ii ct mis. £0 years practical 
i-xpcienee. Inventor of Wood- 
bury's Facial Foap for the 
complexion,. For sale at all 
Drupglsts. Send J 0~. f"iSam- 
ple Size Cnlie an.i i ."j« rmRe Pnok, Illustrated. 
JOHN H. WOODBURY, Dermatologist. 
consultation free. i«J3 West 4'-id SI., N. Y. 




in5TSTJK,_A.jNTCE- 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

IN8URANCE COMPANY, 

OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL. $1,000,000. | ASSETS, $3,000,000. 
AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., 
Gen'I Managers. 

40 to <44 PINE STREET, NEW YORK. 

Assets J2.607.675 76 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,139,756 99 

HAZARDS INSURED. 

EMPLOYEES AND PUBLIC LIABILITY, 
BOILER EXPLOSION. 
GENERAL CASUALTY, 
ELEVATOR ACCIDENT, 
SPRINKLER LOSSES. 
GENERAL ACCIDENT, AND 
FIDELITY. 
BOLGER & BURLING, General Agents, 

403 California Street. 

William Macdokalp, Manager. D. E. Miles, Ass't Manager. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $10.63»,5O 

Net Surplus Over all Liabilities 3,110,305 

315 Montgomery Street, San Francisc o 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse lor San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-ClasB Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 
Office of the Company, 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-California Bank. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 

Geo. Leonard and II. Danker. Managers p. t. for the Pacific Coast 

Branch, 

220 Sansome St., S. F. 

Capital $1,500,000.00 

Invested in U. S 640,346.23 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 

3 32 California St., IS. F.,l'al. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO- of New York., 
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 

A. R. GURREY, Manager. | C A. STUART, As8T. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 
BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $6,700,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
No. 316 California Street. S an Francisco 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'I Agents, 

413 California Street, San Francisco 



Jan. I 




&5UNBEAMS 



AT (our she wanted bonbon*, 
At eight she wanted gum. 
At twdre she yearned for norell 
At sixteen, beaux— yuni-Tom: 

A1 c 'K h " 'III' . n/aged 

Like many other i 
And wanted spoony I 

And scores and 
At twenty she was married— 

Big wedding, rich and tony I 
At twenty-two, ni.i- alack 1 ' 
„,„ , hi , „. „ ,. She wame,i «'"""">•. -Ann™ C% Journal 

:se n h'.^^^r"- is ^vS 5 

P-suedV^Tea^ 

^d e ^ra^S d ^^-ee^,t& S 3£ 
, r , —Piltsbmq Messenger. 

— Washington Star. 
are^tty^uS^ne WA W ptT $ n . W ' Ue " 

Jack sSsir « Yes^ a pe^bKw^ l^SedH^ ' 
r„„ TT „ t , —Washington Capital. '■ 

OHOLL-i Litewaite— Aw, let me have Ave cents' worth n e „>,„.,► 

SS^^F s«fc» 3? 

r.™t Iha ?, no "lea you were in business for yourself Let' me 
have ten cents' worth of roasted, please. y _tv*J, 

want her to hear me spanking you. ° W ' -V^S 

i.„ B . t ' T ' 1 Papa, 'wailed the young woman, "you can have no idea 

••Wen e '! s V a?lThe Si I" » iUIn 8 to h ? ie f °f *e thta m^j „' £8 
rf„-.»i S. ? , old man ' scratching hs head thouehtfullv » I 

d o 0n marr D v°you " * "*" ™ y ° bjeCti ° n t0 that ' j w-afrTd Wanted 

„ T ' —Indianapolis Journal. 

„,.."' poet, 'said the young man resolutely. " Indeed ' " renlierl 
the kind-hearted but absent-minded editor. « Yes And I came to 
see .f jou will not give me a trial." » Dear, dear 1 My good felfow 

educes":' b ° therab0Utatrial - rd i ust P ,ead SuiUy tn^atanTy 

,, — Washington Star. 

it wo S n T 'fh S_My husb ? nd wa s out to adinnerlast night, Bridget and 

rT vl necessary for you to sweep the hall this morning Beid- 
get-Yis, mum. Is there anything else, mum? Miwmw y„" 
might run the carpet-sweeper over his dress sui? a few times 

o».™, , u , ^ —New York ilcrald. 

br-ATT,! (as he lands on an inverted tack)— Great Crcsar Marvl r 

BpS^fntaciSv? 'J? S ° CareleSS aboutll "-°wingtacks arVnd ^ 

opattz (piac dly)— Heury, you are getting meaner and meaner everv 

day. I can buy a whole paper of tacks for five cents meanere very 

" . YoD b ave a far-away look in your eyes to-nieht Maud " ™id 

Ks 7 ;-. sli^Mau? 6 ey63 ° £ten b6tray tte dear f '^n'°' o^r 

— Harper's Bazar. 



SAN PRAM im ,. m.ws i.i i hi; 



I '.I 



reST^ y £*£? "^ '."^fSl W-V '"'«"«. Forth.. 
■ tfublonable patterns , ', •''■»•'"" »"';"l- ". .til tbe latest and 

-CJ-M td U KAJ.M Ui . 



PACIFIC DEPAETMEKT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO.. SUN INSURANCE OFFICE. 

_ OF LONDON. | -_ . . 

BBUbllshod A. I. is ■] „ OF LONDON. 

Paid-up Capital, - . , Voooooo r..h » p , oua <"ed a. n. 1710. 

Cash Asset.', -•.... ^ ' I*'™' SsseuS 8 *^.; , «0.0M,712. 

WM i ,„»„„ „ '"• l "'">- I A8sel8 lu America, - - - 12,610,868. 



THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

OF BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS. As6et8 ^^ 

President. BENJAMIN r. STEVENS. | Vice-Pre,, ALFRED D. FOSTER 

HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Buil ding Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Co. Limited, of London. 
The Imperial Insurance Co. Limited, of London 

WM. SEXTON, r. c . MEDCRAFT 

Manager. Sub-Manager 

« act Hi Hrancli, 221 Samoine St. S 1' 
SWAIN & MURDOCH, City Agents 



FIRE 



THE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 438 ca.lfornla street, S. F. 

_JME INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 



THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCEloMF™ 

COMBINED 

COMBINED CAPITAL . „ or ZDHI0H - 

These three Companies are'liahie'i'nlni-i, o^'j 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

may be sustained. e ' ointly and severally for all Losses that 

HARRY w. SYZ, General Agent, 
.,„„„ .... „,, «n California St., San Francisco . Cal 

tham eV'°^eY1^iiOs1j^^ 

Ca P ,taH^ZT rVOOh Lond °" arxd Manchester. 

Capital Paid Up... S10, 000,000 

Cash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 1,000,000 

Total Assets Deoember 31, 1888 2,126,000 

,„„ „_ '„ ° 8.124,067.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 
"*! 306 California Street. San Ffancltco. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

Capital Paid Up... ^EWYOHK. 

Assets .. . . * 500,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 8,181,768 

■ :„ .i__ 1,526,167 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S F 
City Offlce-501 Montgomery St. ^ ej^i^n^^^^^^ st# 

AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

E8teWM ,eU 183 5 P AK ^ CHAPELLE . SMHAHY. 
Capital, $2,250,000. Total Assets, $6,864,653.65 

United States Department: 204 SANSOME ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
VOSS, COSBAD A CO., General Managers. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
O Bee— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Street 

GEO, r. BBAST, Manager 



INSURANCE COMPANY OF NO^TrTlMERJcT 

capf^ntlyf^d rire J^"^^ Company in the United State^ ^ 

OF PHILADELPHIA, Penh. 

Office Pacific Department— 

412 California Street, San Francisco. 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LE*TER. 



Jan. 6, 1894 . 




A GOSSIPY correspondent sends these notes from Paris: A 
very pretty fancy, for one to whom a plain black gown is 
unbecoming, is a crumpled choker of velvet, turquoise blue, scar- 
let or solferino— making the only bit of color about the gown. 
They are often made detachable, so that a variety may be worn. 
They are wide strips of velvet, unlined, and crushed through a 
curved buckle of steel or jet in front, and they hook invisibly at 
the back. With a handsome jeweled buckle, they are worn 
about the throat with a square cut dinner corsage. This is a very 
clever plan for one who has beautiful shoulders, but a rather 
thin neck. The French modistes have another method, equally 
successful, of giving a needed touch to an entirely black toilet. 
It is by facing the brim of a large hat with a favorite color, and 
bending it about the forehead. While only glimpses of the yellow 
or cardinal are seen, it casts a becoming glow over the face. Black 
tulle or net covered with tiny jet and steel bugles and fine em- 
broideries is used for tabliers and long " angel " sleeves for black 
or gray gowns, and is very effective by gaslight. Mme. Bern- 
hardt is wearing a dazzling mantle of this material at the Renais- 
sance. Its glittering folds quite cover her, and the loose hood is 
thrown over her head. It is worn over a trailing, filmy black 
gown, having much jet and steel embroidery about it, and its 
sinuous windings about her lithe figure recall the divine Sarah of 
old, whom she now so little resembles in appearance. 

Good style in evening clothes is always more easily acquired 
than for the reception or street toilet. If a girl has a pretty 
throat and dresses her hair becomingly, she can almost drape her- 
self in a bit of crepe, and with a sash pose as a beauty. So much 
in evening gowns depends on toe simplicity of the toilet. Unless 
you can afford to put yourself in the bands of a skilled modiste, 
and to ttaia I would always say, make the effort to have your one 
eveniog gown made by a good dressmaker. Crepon in white that 
has a cream tone in it is inexpensive, and I recently saw a pretty 
rosy-cheeked girl look like a dear picture in this very simple 
gown, which was made with a fall accordion plaited skirt. The 
baby waist was gathered into a wide satin broad belt, and finished 
with a flat lengthwise bow in the back. The great sleeves bad a 
fall of lace around the wrist, and the low-cut corsage was edged 
with a very full rufiia of inexpensive but dainty lace. In her 
coiled hair she had pinned a rose, and with a white fan was a 
little princess fit to grace any ballroom in the land. This style in 
all colors or materials would be pretty. Have a feather fan if 
possible. It gives such an air of elegance to a simple gown. The 
gauay ones are dainty, but perishable, but the fan arranged of the 
open ostrich plumes, with a few tip" falling over the white ivory 
handles, can be bought at not a great expense, and will last sea- 
son after season, with a curling now and then. Always have 
your slippers match your gown. If that is too much for your 
parse, wear pointed patent leather slippers with open-worked 
stockiogs. 

A charming toilette will be worn by a tall, Juno-like girl to a 
coming fashionable wedding. It was a pink satin-striped mater- 
ial, with a watered moire pattern running through it, and such a 
shade of pink, not the usual pale pink or the deep shrimp, bnt a 
pink such as one sometimes sees in a beautiful sunset. The skirt 
was made perfectly plain — so easy to say, but so hard to accom- 
plish the desired effect — if plainness meant the most beautiful 
cut, outlining the figure where every inch of it made a graceful 
line. The bodice — and here came the work — was very short on 
the hips, and sharp pointed back and front, but with a curve over 
the hips that made the waist appear at least two inches smaller. 
This was laced up the back, and around the low-cat bodice was a 
cape effect of pink velvet delicately embroidered in pearls, not 
large, tawdry imitations, but the finest delicate seed pearls. This 
cape was cut off the shoulders, and was only about four inches 
deep. It fell over the puffed sleeve, and across the bare shoul- 
ders was a pink cording of p?arls, like shoulder straps, the bare 
neck and shoulders to show on either side of it. With this gown 
the young beauty is to wear pale pink silk stockings, pink satin 
slippers, with a dainty butterfly bow of seed pearls, and long pale 
tan gloves. 

Men who have a high regard for comfort as well as a handsome 
appearance will try the shirts sold by John W. Carmany, 25 Kearny 
street. They fit perfectly. 



A 

Natural 
Sea Bath 
At Home. 

8. W. Cor. Kearny and California 8ts. 



MANHATTAN MEDICAL SEA SALT euables you 
to enjoy a refreshing salt water bath at home. 

A remedial agent in Rheumatism, Debility, Weak- 
ness or 8oreness of the Joints, and Affections of the 
Muscular System. 

This salt has been purified and freed from all ani- 
mal and vegetable matter, and can be used with per- 
fect freedom. The price is within the reach of all. 

Trial package, 10 cent size, contains sufficient Salt 
for 2 to 4 baths; large 5 lb. boxes, 26 cents, contain 
sufficient Salt for 5 to 10 baths. 
IR._ ELLEET, Agent. 



Telephone No. 1035. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 



SHIPPING and COMMISSION MERCHANTS: 



. GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS.' 




Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco. 

National Assurance Company - )F Ireland 

Atlas Assurance Company ------ of London 

Boylston Insurance Company of Boston 

Ocean Marine Insurance ------ of London 

MRS. W. E. SPENCER, ha J?or E . 

202 ELLIS ST., NEAR MASON. 
Elegant Manicuring and Hair Dressing Parlors. 
Pacific Coast wholesale and retail agent for 
ISABUI. 1'ASSIDY'S superior toilet preparations 
CREME BEATRICE, the most delightful toilet 
preparation of the age, keeps the skin in per- 
fect condition, removes all secretions and stimu- 
lates circulation. A Turkish balh for the face. 
Price, 50c. 

EXQUISITE JAVA RICE FACE POWDER, de- 
-Vv?-'' lightfully perfumed, adhesive aud transparent; su- 

perior in every way; cream, naturelle, white, 50c. 
WITCH HAZEL COLD CREAM, cooliug, healing, refreshing; does not 
leave the skin greasy. You will like it. Price, 35c. 

"BEAU BRUMMELL" Finder Nail Polish; instantaneous in its effect; a 
beautiful polish and a delicate pink tint to the nail: beneficial. Price, 50c. 
The above and a full line of superior Toilet and Mauicure Goods manu- 
factured by ISABEL CASSIDY, 30 West Twenty-third street, New York, and 
201 Masonic Temple, Chicago, on hand here. Indorsed by the profession. 
Circulars sent on application. 

PACIFIC MINING AGENCY 
AND TRUST COMPANY. 

Irwin C. Stump, President. Wm. C. Rslston, Secretary. The Anglo- 

Californian Bank, Ld , Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS-Irwin C. Stump, Irving M. Scott, Jacob H. Neff, W.F. 
Goad, R. C. Chambers, P. N. Lihenlhal, D. M. Burns. 

MILLS BUILDING, San Francisco. 

This company has been formed to sell mining and ditch properties and 
water rightH on commission only. It is prepared to act as agent and broker 
for the sale and purchase of such properties. Mines listed at its offices 
will be brought to the attention of investors; no bond is required until 
there is a prospective purchaser. 

i he company will look after the interests of non residents or obtain in- 
formation for them; it will also assist mining engineers, superintendents, 
foreraeo, assayers, millmen and miners to obtain employment. 

The Company is prohibited by its articles of incorporation from buying 
or selling mines on its own account, and except as agent or factor for 
others. 




PASSPORT TO BEAUTY 

— is — 

LOLA MONTEZ CREME. 

Mrs. Nettie Harrison will remove Freckles, Pimples, 
Blackheads, Mothpaicbes.aaUowness, Wrinkles, Deep 
Lines. Fill oi-t sunken cheeks, aud make the old and 
wasted flesh, healthy, firm and youthful again or 
MONEY REFC1NDED. 

SIH-KKI.I'OIS HAIR 
ihEmttwifiisofL " Permanently removed by the electric needle. 

FREE TREATMENT for beautifying the complexion will be given any 
one presenting this ad . at my parlors. 

MRS. NETTIE HARRISON, America's Beauty Doctor, 
26 Ceary St., S. F., Cal. 

CLASSES 

In Drawing, Painting and Outdoor Sketching. 

EDWIN DEAKIN, 
OSCAR DEAKIN. 



STUDIO 




No 8 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET. 
South Berkeley, 3100 Telegraph avenue, between 
Ashby and Alcatraz. 

UNION GAS AND 
GASOLINE ENGINES. 

1600 IN USE. 

For LAUNCHES, 

PRINTING OFFICES 

PUMPING 

jj And all purposes where power is required. 

UNION GAS ENGINE OO. 

221-223 First St., S. F. 
Send for Catalogue. 



Jan . 6, 1894 . 



s\\ I i:\v i-m (i SEWS LETTEB 



21 



<&^MF*™m 



—A****** 



') 



THE writer of this column wasi talking with * prominent reAi- 
esttte miin on Thursday m or nine, and although tbe oon versa- 
lion was confide nlial, some of it may be given, and it u ill be of 
value to Ibose who are interested in tbe welfare and progress ol 
Baa Francisco. Tbe gentleman in question said that only tboso 
who have watched the development of this city daring the past 
ten years have any idea of its* immense growth during that per- 
iod. Before that time it was pioddiog along in an easy-going 
way, unmindful of tbe future. It would prohably havi continued 
in this way for some time bad it not been for (he Triennial Con- 
clave of tbe Knights Templar, which was held here in 1883. This 
was the first great advertisement that San Francisco ever received, 
and from that date it has continued to spread to the westward 
with gigantic slndts. Not only this, but all the large office build- 
ings of this city, with the exception of the Flood and the Phelan 
buildings, have been erected within that time. It was ten years 
ago, also, that tbe Market street cable road was opened, thus 
bringing into the market an immense area of residence property, 
ending from tbe Panhandle to Thirtieth street. Not long after 
this the Powell street cable system was pat into operation, and it 
raised the price of lots in tbe vicinity of Presidio Heights. Since 
then cable roads and electric lines have been built with great 
rapidity, making San Francisco noted the world over for its 
transportation facilities. During this period, also, new theatres 
and concert nails have been erected, also a large free library and 
many new schools. The Union Iron Works has proved to be 
equal to any institution in the United States in building war- 
ships, and it is not alone in tbe field, for the Fulton Iron Works 
has a new and complete ship building plant, and is now situated 
so as to undertake tbe building o( tbe largest vessels. It would 
be useless to name here tbe many new buildings that have been 
erected in the decade just passed. Every one knows them, and 
every one rejoices in the fact that they are not only a credit to 
the growth of the city but to architecture as well. San Francisco 
Js to-day just on the otaer side of a border line that exists between 
a g en ciiy and a village, and if tbe property owners continue to 
do as much work in tbe next ten years as they have done in the 
past, this city will be a wonder. 

" So much for the past. Now that the great impetus of vis- 
itors will attend the Midwinter Fair, California, and San Fran- 
cisco in particular, will receive tbe grandest advertisement of its 
life. When the Kuights Templar came here, little or nothing was 
known iu Eastern communities of our possibilities as a city. 
What has been the result of such an advertisement and others 
that came after? It follows, then, that the Mid winter Fair must 
be put to the best possible use as an advertisement for San Fran- 
cisco. It should be the starting-point for the new decade; it 
should be made to form the opening of a new era in building, 
venture and prosperity. The success of the Fair is assured. Its 
opening on Monday last was hailed with delight by every patri- 
otic citizen who resides within the borders of this county, and 
every citizen should make the coming six months a period 
wherein he should find time to assure at least one Eastern vis- 
itor that there are better prospects for wealth by investing in this 
city than were ever hung by the Almighty on the edge of a 
retreating rainbow." 

The first week of the .New Year opened very quietly. All the 
dealers are making plans for the future. Notwithstanding the 
fact that some bankers have given out that the savings institu- 
tions will not lend money, the real estate dealers say that they 
will. The savings banks, say the dealers, were the first to make 
any offers in this respect and tbey did so without being induced 
by anyone. All the banks tied up their spare cash pretty tightly 
when the financial stringency first took bold of the country in 
order to save themselves, now that they hare found out that tbe 
worst is over, they are quite willing to make loans again. Al- 
though it is the general impression that trade in tbe buildingline 
is very quiet, it is, nevertheless, a fact that the contracts for the 
past month show a value for at least $50,000 more than for the 
same period last year. Improvements amounting to $6,000,000 
in value were contracted for in 1S93, which is at the rate of $500,- 
000 per month. This sum was expended mostly for material and 
labor. 

A small boom has been started in the lots along the electric line 
to San Mateo county, and quite a number of sales have been re- 
ported, the lots bringing a fair price. 

The premises known as the Commercial Hotel, located at the 
intersection of Kearny and Pacific streets and Montgomery 
avenue, are for sale in order to close out an estate. 

Baldwin and Hammond are offering for sale a series of lots on 
Jackson and Polk streets, which ought to prove good property 
for stores and fiats. 



Shainwald, Buckbee 6c Co., Real Estate Agents, Mills Build- 
ing, 218-220 Montgomery street. Special attention given to the col- 
ection of rents. Full charge taken of property for absent owners. 



Scott's Emulsion 

of cod-liver oil presents a 
perfect food — palatable, 
easy of assimilation, and 
an appetizer ; these arc 
everything to those who 
are losing flesh and 
strength. The combina- 
tion of pure cod-liver oil, 
the greatest of all fat pro- 
ducing foods, with Hypo- 
phosphites, provides a re- 
markable agent for Quick 
Flesh Building in all ail- 
ments that are associated 
with loss of flesh. 

Prepnrpd by Scott A Bownc. Chemists, 
Mow York. Sold by ull druggisLB. 



InTOTICE of eemoval. 
dr. j. h stallard 

Has removed his office to 514 Sutter St. Hours, 12 to 2 daily, except 
Thursdays and Sundays. Telephone 52QJ. 

DR. JOHN GALLWEY 

to his new offices, 634 KEARNY street, near Clay. 
Hours— 1 :30 to 4 P . M. and 7 :30 to 9 F . M. 
Telephone 207.] l Residence, 1331 Leavenworth. 



D 



R. THOMAS L. HILL, DENTIST, 



OFFICE— ODD FELLOWS' BUILDINU, 8. W. Corner Seventh and 

Market Streets. 
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Consultation Hours: 4 to 5. 



D 



R. R. CUTLAR, DENTIST, 



Removed from Phelan Building, to 
NO. 416 GEARY STREET ----- San FRANCISCO 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 
806 Market Street (Phelan Building.) 

Gas dpeclalists. Originated the ub6 of Pure .Nitrous Oxide Gas for poia- 
tively extracting teeth without paiu. "Colton Gas" has an established and 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for Its purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
In all eases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established 1863. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also performs 
all operations in dentistry. 

DR. CHARLES W. DECKER 



D 



R. MACKENZIE'S 



English ELECTRIC BELTS. 



The only Electric Belt with Special nerve Electrodes. Agency at 

JOY'S BALDWIN PHARMACY, 

Powell and Market Sts., S. F. 

CANCER. 
THE KOEHLEK CANCER CURE CO., 1428 Market St., S. P. 
Cancer, Tumors or malignant growths removed without knife or caus 
tic. A GUARANTEED CURE a specialty Call or send for circular. Over 
300 cancers preserved in alcohol in our office. Consultation free. 

PHILIP KOEHLER, Manager. 

RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the 
Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vital- 
ity, Physical Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medi- 
cine. Paris, and the Medical celebrities. Agents for California and the 
Pacific States, J «. STEELE & Co., 635 MARKET STREET (Palace 
Hotel), Sau Francisco. Sent by mail or express anywhere, 

PRICES REDUCED. Box of 50 pills, $1.25; of 100 pills, »2; of 200 pills, 
tg 50; of 400 pills, 36: Preparatory Hills, $2. Wend for Circular. 



DR. RICORD'S 




135 Montgomery St, near Bush, San Francisco, Cal. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 6, 1894 . 



THE New Year has opened very auspiciously; the sun has 
shone brightly this week, and though the air has been nip- 
ping in its frostiness, it has but inclined one to eojoy the gayeties 
which are more plentiful just now than during any other Janu- 
ary for several years past. There are teas, and rumors of teas, 
weddings, dinners, and, best of all, dances will not be so much 
the exception this season as last. New Years' gatherings were 
many, but nearly all on a small scale, dinners and small home 
parties being the rule, the one at Mrs. Will Crocker's taking the 
lead in point of size. __ 

Gayest among the out of town gatherings of New Year's was 
the dance at the Eyre's at Menlo Park on Monday evening. Not 
alone was the Eyre house filled to overflowing with guests, but 
every residence in the vicinity had its full quota of friends, stay- 
ing there for the purpose of taking part in the festivities, while 
many others went down on the afit-rnooo train, and merely ac- 
cepted a temporary hospitality for tbe night. That it was a most 
enjoyable affair goes without saying, albeit the night was dark 
and cold, and country roads are not the most pleasant to travel 
under such conditions. But the guests all had a delightful time 
and " the mistletoe hung in the ball ;" there was dancing without 
stint, ending with the cotillion, for which some lovely favors 
were provided, and the supper was a feast, such as Mrs. Eyre 
knows so well how to give. 

Del Monte is quite picturesque at this time of the year, and a 
large number of Eastern people are passing the winter months 
there. Tbe ball on New Year's Eve was well attended, notwith- 
standing the fact that there were several important events on the 
Bame Dight in this city. Among those at Del Monte on New 
Year's were Mrs. Francisco de Ojeda, of 1950 California street, 
and her sister, Miss Marie Durand. Mrs. Luis de Ojeda and Al- 
fonso Barillas, the daughter and son of ex-President Barillas, of 
Guatemala, were the guests of Mrs. F. de Ojeda. Miss Jennie 
Hobbs, Miss Willey, Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Stone, A. H. Small, 
W. B. Waldron, Dr. and Mrs. Robert Low, of London, Mr. and 
Mrs. Will E. Fisher, MisB Nellie Drum, Miss Forrest, Miss Jen- 
nings, Mrs. T. Van Winkle, Miss Van Winkle and Miss Van Ingen, 
weie among the New Year's guests. The ball was a success. 
The decorations were pretty and attractive, and the supper was 
quite an elaborate affair. 



The cotillion, at Odd Fellow's Hall, last night was tbe second 
of tbe Friday Night Club's series of this season. While not so 
largely attended as was the first, it was very successful. Several 
new faces, not seen at the first two of tbe club's parties, were 
noticed on this occasion, among tbem Lieutenant Strotber, who 
bas just returned from bis post of duty at the World's Fair, and 
George Vernon Gray, who came down from his ranch on purpose 
to take part in the dance. 



But Del Monte and Menlo did not monopolize all the plasures, 
for it has been very gay at tbe Navy Yard this week, commenc- 
ing with a reception and dance on board the Albatross on Monday 
afternoon and a ball at the Commandante's on Monday evening. 
Among the ladies who assisted Mrs. Howison in her duties as 
hostess was Miss Ruger of San Francisco, who has been her guest 
during the past ten days. 



Tbe pleasurable rivalry existing between the two leading for- 
eign clubs, the San Francisco Verein and the Concordia, had a 
climax during holiday week. On Saturday, the 30th, the Con- 
cordia ball was given, and on the following night tbe Verein gave 
its New Year's dance. Both the affairs were exceptionally ele- 
gant, both in arrangement and attendance, almost tbe same guests 
being present at each affair. The Jewith circles of socieiy are 
remarkable for beautiful women and their exquisite toilettes, and 
on these occasions they fully sustained their reputation. Tbe 
club-rooms w ere handsomely decorated with green garlind^, palms 
and bright berries. At the Verein, the stage at tbe end of tbe ball- 
room, where many successful performances have been held, was 
decked with palms and ferns, in tbe midst of which the orchestra 
was situated. At midnieht a magnificent supper was served, 
toasts drank and hearty good wishes exchanged on all sides. 
The feature of the Verein ball was tbe cotillion given by Mr. 
Benno Hart, who bad for his partner Miss A. Greenbaum. Tbe 
figures were excellently carried out and tbe favors elegant and 
costly. After supper the dancing was of a general character, 
and was kept up until tbe New Year was several hours old. As 
this was tbe last entertainment of the Verein in its old quarters, 
the gufsts seemed reluctant to say adieu to scenes endeared lo 
them by many past pleasures. At tbe Concordia, the magnifi- 
cence of tbe toilettes of the ladies won the admiration of all. 
Such a dazzling display of jewels bas seldom been seen in San 
Francisco, and it was difficult, wbile looking at the gliitering 
scene, to realize that such a thing as bard times had ever been 
heard of on our shores. 



The most ambitious tea of the present week was given by Mrs. 
Breeze on Thursday. The afternoon hours were devoted to tbe 
elders, wbile the younger members of our society danced the 
evening merrily away. Mr. Alec. Wilberforce's tea ibis afternoon 
will be a new dt-parture, and though much curiosity is expressed 
regarding it, there is little doubt of its success. 



Parties at tbe Hotel Pleasanton are always enjoyable, and one 
of the most pleasant ever given there was that which took place 
on Thursday evening of last week, when the dancing was kept up 
until a late hour. The Christmas hop at the Colonial on Wed- 
nesday night was quite a large party and a very pleasant one 
also. Another of Thursday evening's dances was the young peo- 
ple's cotillion at Miss West's school on Van Ness avenue. The 
rooms were tastefully decorated and general dancing was in 
order until supper, which was served at eleven o'clock. Then 
followed the cotillion led by Mr. E. M. Greenway and Miss Ethel 
Keeney. There were four figures danced and all were executed 
very creditably, and greatly enjoyed by the future buds and their 
advanced partners. A bop at the Presidio was another of tbe 
pleasant gatherings of Thursday evening. In spite of the dense 
fog, which rendered the drive over tbe road far from being either 
pleasant or safe, a large number went from town, as Ibey well 
kuew how much enjoyment awaited them at the hospitable post, 
aud the anticipations were fully realized. 



The ball given by the Misses Hobart last Friday evening may 
be classed among the chief successes of tbe season. Of a verity 
all the concomitants were there to make it so; large rooms and 
plenty of them, bright lights, good music, and guests determined 
to enjoy themselves. The latter were nearly all young people, 
even the married folk, with a few exceptions, came under that 
head. The costumes worn by the ladies were elegant and becom- 
ing. Christmas greens and bright red berries were used chiefly 
for decorative purposes, and with roses aud violets to add tbeir 
sweet perfume, the house appeared in a most attractive form. 
The supper could not have been improved, and the dance was 
prolonged until a late hour. 

The pleasures of the gay world for next week are many and 
varied. The Voorhies-Henry wedding will be one of the events of 
Monday evening. Another will be tbe first meeting of tbe Fort- 
nightly Club, this season, at the residence of Major Ralhbone on 
Clay and Jones streets; the party to be given by Mr. and Mrs. 
William Cluff, also takes place on that night. They will celebrate 
the fifteenth anniversary of their wedding day. On Tuesday, the 
Occidental Hotel parlors will present a lively appearance, as they 
will be filled with the guests of Mro. Mayoardier, who gives a 
tea on that afternoon, between the hours of three and five. She 
will have the assistance of several ladies, whose husbands are 
among tbe military stationed at this place, to help her receive 
her friends. On Friday, the 12th, there will be a large dancing 
party at Mrs. Charles Holbrook's handsome residence on Van 
Ness avenue, which is sure to be a most enjoyable gathering. 



There is little doubt that January will have but few unoccupied 
dates, judging from the fact that there is something on tbe cards 
for almost every day and night. On Monday, the 15th, there 
will be a dinner dance at the residence of the Irving Scotts, on 
Harrison street, and on the same evening the Church Club will 
give an elaborate dinner at the Occidental Hotel, at which Prof. 
Joseph LeConte will be among the speakers. Tuesday, the 16th, 
is the date set for the Artillery ball at the Presidio, and all those 
who were tbe guests at the Cavalry ball last year, are eagerly 
looking forward to a repetition of its delights. 

In addition to other forms of enienaining in January, many 
hostesses have selected days in which they will informally re- 
ceive their friends. For instance, Mrs. Coleman on Tuesdays, the 
Misses Dimond on Wednesdays. Tbe wedding reception of Mr. 
and Mrs. Elisha Cook, Jr., and Mrs. Will Crocker's Wednesday 
dinners, are among tbe established pleasures of-the month. Mrs. 
Gordon Blanding's day at home during January will be Friday. 

Awarded Highest Honors World's Fair. 

DANCE'S 




Baking 
Powder, 



The only Pure Cream of tartar Powder.— No ammonia; No Alnm 
Used in Millions of Homes — iO years the Standard 



jan. 8, 1894. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETT] i: 






On Tbor.*day last, 8t Johl pal Church, in Oakland, 

wn charmingly dretsad with Bowers ami foliage, pepper boughs 
«n>l fhrysanihemuniv (he chief of the tdornnientfl Win i In- 
arches of sruilix and accacfa from which dependtd a beautiful 
bell of marguerites, beneath which was performed the wedding 
ceremony of Miss Fanny Orr tnd Rlcbard Holmes. Jr. of Den- 
rei Col. The Qsbers, Messrs. Rhode*, Borden and Steadman 
VanWycke. had by no means a light task in seating the many 
guests who filled the church While the gnesta were being 
seated Harry Hunt performed a selection of airs on the organ. 
The widding march gave notice, at the hour of noon, of the ap- 
proach of the bridal party. The cortege, as it entered, was led by 
little Edna Orr. Mlsa Bertha Goodrich appearing as maid-of-honor 
The groom's best man was his brother Henry, who, with other 
members of the family, accompanied him from his Denver home 
to be present at the ceremony. The bride was given away by 
her father. The Rev. Dr. Aekerly officiated, with the assistance 
of the Kev. F. Church. A wedding breakfast followed at the Orr 
residence, to which only the most intimate friends of the family 
were invited, and later in the day the happy pair departed on a 
honeymoon trip through the Southern counties. Denver is their 
ultimate destination. Next on the list of Oakland weddings will 
be the nuptials of Miss May Jackson and Henry Gonzales, 
which will be solemnized at St. Andrew's Church on Tuesday 
evening of next week. 

Alameda had its notable wedding on Tuesday evening last. At 
the residence of Captain J. K.. Brown, on Sama Clara avenue, 
Miss Estelle Chittenden and Clifton Hicks, of St. Helena, were 
joined together in holy wedlock. 



Among San Francisco nuptials was that of Miss May Kincaid- 
Josephi and A. E. Shaw, which took place at the home of the 
bride's parents, on Page street, last Saturday afternoon. Afterthe 
ceremony the assembled company, which was limited to members 
of both families, sat down to a weddiug breakfast. Judge Heb- 
bard, who tied the nuptial knot, was particularly happy in 
responding to one of the toasts. The presents received were 
handsome and numerous. 



The Christmas High Jinks at the Bohemian Club was a grand 
occasion. The decorations of the rooms were profuse and ex- 
quisite, and the unusually large attendance proved the wisdom 
of the Clnb in its provision for mote ample quarters in the future. 
President Gerberding was the sire, and papers were read by James 
D. Phelan, Dan O'Connell, Horace Piatt and others. The music 
was of course a great feature. Donald de V. Graham sang " Noel," 
as only he can sing it, and the orchestral accompaniment was 
perfect. The Low Jinks, under the direction of Willard Barton, 
were a perfect piece of comedy. The club was thrown open to the 
lady friends of the members on Wednesday, and a number visited 
the rooms, and were delighted with the profuse and tasteful or- 
namentation. 



After an absence of a year and a half Theodore Wores turned 
up this week from Japan. Wores has been working mos*, indus- 
triously during that period, and has made many ambitious pic- 
tures. He does not intend, however, to have an exhibition or sale 
in this city. With the exception of a few unfinished pictures 
which be will work on here, the rest will remain unpacked in 
transitu to New York, where the art market is better. Wores 
met the Gillig party in Yokohama, and took Clay Greene, Frank 
Unger and Gillig for a trip through the interior. As the artist 
speaks the language fluently, he was able to explain to them 
many of the curious features of the domestic life of that interest- 
ing country. In two months or so he will proceed to the East, 
and have a reunion with Carlsen, Rix, and other California artists, 
who have found the atmosphere of Gotham more conducive to 
the production of shekels than the balmier climate of the West. 

Already our Midwinter Fair visitors are arriving, among the 
earliest of whom are Mrs. George Pullman and Miss Pullman, 
who intend remaining here for a couple of months at least, and 
thus see a little of Mrs. Frank Carolan before they depart for 
their future home in Washington State. 



Owing to the recent bereavement in the family, the wedding of 
Miss Daisy Ainsworth to Percy T. Morgan, for which invitations 
have been issued, will not take place at St. Paul's Church, Oak- 
land, as originally intended, but the ceremony will be held in a 
strictly private manner at the Ainsworth residence. 

An item of interest to Pacific Coast people is the debut of Miss 
May Belle Steuart, the youngest daughter of Nevada's junior 
Senator, which took place recently in Washington, D. C. The 
young lady made ber first society appearance at a tea given at 
the residence of her parents on Vermont avenue, which was 
largely attended. 

This evening the Union League Club will give a reception at 
its new home in the Palace Hottl. 



During the past week Mrs. Crux gave one of her exquisite 
luncheons to a few friends. 



SIN'K almost every day (he papers are filled with recitals o f 
new forgeries and Ingenious robberies and confidence opera- 
tions of all kind-, it Ifl time that we should advertise for SOfflC 
Diogenes to come ar. . mid with his lantern and help us find an 
I man. After all, this is the principle of socialism asserting 
itself in secret channels, which consist ol getting the better <>f our 
fellows whenevi t wo can. Your highwayman gets out with his 
pistol and crie?, •■Stan.: and deliver! " intimating that bis victim 
has more money than be is entitled t... and the disturber of estab- 
lished conditions wants his share. The more skillful villain effects 
with a little penmanship the financial whipping of his man, and 
always secures the larger dividend. But those things will never 
be regulated until the world's great congress is called, and every 
man possessed of two dollars and a half be compelled to yield up 
seventy-five cents of it to a fund for the world's failures. 



ONE of the most attractive features of the Midwinter Fair is the 
'49 mining camp. It contains many of the novelties that are 
associated with the early mining life in Nevada, which will bring 
back pleasant memories to nearly all of the old residents, and 
form a source of great interest to the younger generation. Sam 
Davis, the well-known humorist, is printing a paper in the 
camp, in the old '49 style. 



SANBORN, VAIL & CO. have always carried blank books and 
other office supplies as a regular part of their very extensive 
stock, but they have now made a separate department of these 
goods and placed it under the charge of a specialist. The stock 
has been made larger and more comprehensive, embracing fine 
ledgers and all other first-class goods required by offices. 




The doctors recommend, for indigestion, after dinner chewing for 
half an hour Adams' Tutti Frutti Pepsin Chewing Gum. 

Rich, juicy oysters such as are those kept by Moraghan, stalls 63 
to 67, California Market, are indispensable to any table where people 
have trained palates and clear consciences. 

Choice flowers are verv hard to get just now, owing to the sever- 
ity of ihe cold weather. But no matter what you want in this line, 
you can find it at Leopold's, on Post St., below Kearny. Leopold is 
the leading florist, and can supply anv quantity of the choicest roses, 
chrysanthemums, violets, or, in short, any kind of flowers, at the 
shortest notice. 

THREE AND ONE-HALF DAYS TO THE WORLD'S 
FAIR.— We take pleasure in advising the readers of the 
Newsletter that the UNION PACIFIC is the most 
directandqnickestlinefrom San Francisco and all points 
| in California to the WORLD'S FAIR. 

It is the ONLY LINE running Pullman's latest im- 
proved vestibuled Drawing-Room Sleepers and Dining 
Cars from San Francisco to Chicago without change, and only one 
change of cars to New York or Boston. 

Select Tourist Excursions via the UNION PACIFIC leave San 
Francisco every Thursday for Chicago, New York and Boston in 
charge of experienced Managers, who give their personal attention 
to the comfort of ladies and children traveling alone. 
Steamship Tickets to and from all points in Europe. 
For tickets to the World's Fair and all points east, and for Sleep- 
ing Car accommodations, call on or address D. W. Hitchcock, Gen- 
eral Agent Union Pacific System, No. 1 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco. 



Unlike the Dutch Process 

STo Alkalies 

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Other Chemicals 

are used in the 
preparation of 

W. BAKER & CO.'S 




reakfastCocoa 

whicU is absolutely 
pure and soluble. 

] It has more than three times 
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It is delicious, nourishing, and easily 

DIGESTED. 

Sold byGrorers everywhere. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass, 



ZISKA INSTITUTE, 

1604-1606 VAN NESS AVENFE, San Francisco. 

French, German and English day and boarding school for young ladies 
and children. Next term begins August 3, 1893. For prospectus, address 

MME.B. ZISKA. A. M., Principal. 



24 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 
Trai.is Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SIN FRANCISCO : 

Le ave I From Jan.. 7, 1894. I akbivb 

700 A Atlantic Express. Ogden and East 6:45 A 

7-00 A Benicla, Vaoaville, {Rumscy, Sac- 

ramentoand Redding via Davis.. 7:15 f 

7:30 A Martinez. San Ramon, Napa, Calis- 

toga and *Santa Ro*a 6 :lo p 

8-30 A Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, "Oroville, 
andRed Bluff *: 15lp 

9-00 a New Orleans Express, Santa Bar- 
bara, Los Angeles, Deming, El 
Paso. New Orleans and East. >>:45P 

*9:00 a Stockton and Milton. . *8:45 p 

U000 A Haywards, Niles and San Jose. . J6:15 p 
*12 00 st Haywards, Niles and San Jose *b:15 P 
*1 00 p Sacramento River steamers «9 :00 p 

400 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejp, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano, and 
Santa Rosa 9:1ja. 

400 p. Benicla, Vacaville, Espirto, 
$§R'im-ey, Woodland, Knight's 
Landing. Marysville, Oroville 
and Sacramento 10:45a 

4-30P. Niles. Livermore and San Jo<e. 8:15 A 

5 00 p. Martinez. 8toekton, Modesto, Mer- 

ced and Fresno 10:45a 

5-OOp. Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 

BakerBfield, Santa Barbara and 

Los Angeles 10:16a. 

503 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mojave and East 10:45 a. 

6:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East . 9;45a 

6 00 p. Haywards, Niles and Sao Jose.. 7:45a. 

(7:00p.Vallejo +8:45 P. 

7-00 p. Oregon Express. Sacramento, 

Marysville, Redding, Portland, 
Puget Sound and East 10:4) A 

Santa Cruz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

8:15a. Newark. Oeotervllle, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 6:20 p. 

*2-15 P Newark, Oenterville, San Jose. New 
Almaden, Felton, Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 

stations *11:50a 

4:16p. Newark. SanJose, Los Gatos. 9:50a. 

+11:45 P. Hunters' Train for Newark, Al- 
viso, tfan Jose, Los Gatos and way 

sta tions 17:20P 

Coast Olwl slon fThlrd a id Trtwnsonrt Streets!. 
6 45 A. San Jose, New Almaden and way 

Stations 2:45r. 

8:15 A. San Jose, Tree Pinos-Santa Cms, 
Pacific Grove. Paso Kobles, 8an 
San Luis Obispo and principal 

Way Stations 6 -26 p. 

10:40a. San Jose, and WayStations... 5:06p. 

12:25 p. Palo Alto and Way Stations.. 4:15 p. 
•2:20p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

PaclficGrove ..*10:40A. 

*3:30 p. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions.. *8:47A. 

*4:25p. Palo Alto and Way Stations *8:06a. 

5:10 p. San Jose and Way Stations 8:48a, 

6 :30 p. Palo Alto and Way Stations 6 :35 A. 

H1'-15p. P ft l° Alto and principal Way 

Stations +7:26p. 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From SIS FKAS'ISCO — Foot of Market St. (Slip 8)— 
»7 00 *8 00 9 01 *10 00 and 11 00 a. u„ *12 30 
11 (0 «2 00 3 00 *4 00 5 00 and *d 00 p. M. 
From n\KIA»fl— Foot of Broadway. 

*6 00 *7 00 8 00 *9 00 10 00 and «11 00 A. M. 
112 00 »12 30 2 00 *3 00 4 00 and »5 00 p. M. 

A. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

*8undays excepted. ^Saturdays only. 

tSundaysouly. 
5 Monday. Wednesday and Friday ouly. 
ftfi j GolKG— Saturday and Sunday oufy. 
>' \ Returning— Sunday and Monday only. 

The PACIFIC TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other information. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIR3T and BRAN 
NAN STREETS, at 3: 00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Gaelic Tuesday, Jhu. 9, 1894 

Belgic .Thursday, Feb. 8, 1894 

Oc-anic (via Honolulu) .. Tuesdav. Feb 27, 1894 
Gaelic Tuesday, March 20, 1894 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES 

CabiD Plans on exhibition and Passage 
iIcxatB for sale at S. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
streets. San Francisco. 

For freight apply at offices of Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company, at wharf, or at No. 202 
Front street, San Francisco 

T. A. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 6,1894. 



THE Mohammedan paradise is a fairy 
land. To enter it the believer must 
cross seven bridges, at each of which he 
must answer questions relating to bis past 
life. Having crossed the bridges be is at 
the entrance. There are 13 doors. The 
first act is to take a bath, which gives to 
the body great brilliancy. This abode of 
delight is built of bricks of gold and of sil- 
ver held together by a mortar of musk. 
Four oceans soothe the senses — one of 
water, one of milk, one of honey, one of 
wine. Waves of perfume envelop them, 
so powerful as to be noticeable 500 days' 
march away. Lastly come the castles of 
the houris — 70 castles with 70 rooms, con- 
taining 70 state beds and 70 tables ready 
set, and in this castle 1,680,700,000 houris. 
This to each of the elect. He himself has 
70 robes of green brocade embroidered 
with rubies and topazes. Great Prophet! 
Let us all be Turks. — The Critic, Halifax. 



HOW often do we come across expres- 
sions familiar to us from babyhood, 
yet if called upon by a foreigner to explain 
their origin we should be puzzled. 

Take, for instance, one with which we 
are pretty sure to be but too well ac- 
quainted, " Eating humble pie." " Urn- 
bles " are the beart, liver and entrails of 
the deer, and the huntsman's perquisites. 
When the venison pastry was served on 
the dais to the lord and his friends, the 
huntsman and his fellows had to content 
themselves with a pastry made of the 
" umbles." 

" I don't care a rap." " Rap " was a 
base half-penny, worth about half a farth- 
ing, issued for the nonce in Ireland in 1721. 

The expression we so constantly use, 
«• O, dear niel " is a corruption of *< O.deus 
meus! " — " O, my God! " "Oat of sorts," 
is a printer's expression, being out of a 
particular letter. —Hearth and Home. 



IT is estimated that there are perhaps as 
many as 1000 traveling theatrical com- 
panies in the United States. 

This includes everything that can be 
considered strictly professional companies, 
to say nothing of the countless amateur 
organizations. Of the strictly theatrical 
organizations it is safe to presume that t be 
average receipts per night for the 1000 
companies is $400 each. At seven per- 
formances per week for each company, 
the weekly average, as will be seen, would 
be $2800. 




$25 to $50 



per week, 
to Ace n t*, 

Lit .Hi - or 

GentU'ineti. u-luij or -<-ilin_- 
"Old Kellublt: Plater." Or.ly 

pruoikul W^y to rvplatu rusty and 
worn knives, forks, spoon% rlr; 
quickly done by dipping iu melted 
mL'tal. No experience, polishiug 
or macliiuerv. Thick plaic at ouu 
operation; lasts 5 lo 10 yearn; line 
finish when tnkeu from the plater. 
Ei-erv family baa plating to do, 
E-lateraella readily. L'roQta large. 

W. F. II. ..-i-i .,„.'.■:,,..( ,,[[ ,..,u. 




CAN I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

Srompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
IU1VN tfc CO., who have had nearlvflity years' 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A H nmlbook of In- 
formation concerning Patents and how to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue of mechan- 
ical and scicntiiic books sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the Scientific American, and 
thus are brought widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weekly, elegantly illustruted, has bv far the 
largest circulation of any scientific work in the 
world. St.3 a year. Sample copies pent free. 



ouses. with plans, enabling builders to show the 

in f 1 fit flesk'ii.- ,'itnl siTiire contracts. Address 

ann?N & CO., New yoke, 361 Broadway. 



f* 8 



For_ 



Busy Men. 



M Business men with exhausted nerves 
)i and tired heads need a stimulating 
<: food that will replace tile daily wear 

• and tear. The phosphorus, lime and 

f sodium contained in 




('• is what you must have. It is an ac- 
t knowledged fact that no other food 
[ contains so large a percentage of nerve 

<tnd brain stimulant as this. 
[ Never buy Clam Bouillon for the sick, 
f except in Glass Bottles. 

Grocers and Druggists. 
\i Six }4 pint boules expressed rorSl.50. Send 
(1 stamps for book, " Household Hints." 
?{ F.. S Burnham Co., I20 Ganesvonrt St., N.Y. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 

America. 

BAILINGS— At noon. 

S. 8. "Acapulco," January 8, 1894. 

S. S. "Colon, " Januarv IS, 1994. 

S. S. "San Juan," January 29, 1894. 

S- S. " Sau Bias," February 8, 1894. 

Note. — When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA 

AND HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc. : 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

8. 8. "City of Peking," Thursday, January 

18, 1894, at 3 p. M. 

S. S. "China," via Honolulu, Tuesday, January 
30, 1894, at 3 p. M. 

8. 8. "Peru," Saturday, February 17, 1894, at 
3 p. M. 

S.S. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Thursday, March 
8, 18t'4, at 3 P. M. 
Rouud TriD Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 
202 Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 
General Agent 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports iu Alaska, y a. m.. Jan. 10,25; Feb. 9, 24; 
March 11, 26; April and May, 10, 25. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
Jan. 5th, and every 5th day thereafter. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, (Santa Monica,) 
Redondo, (Los Angeles), and Newport, every 
fourth and fifth day, at 11 a. m. 

For ports in Mexico, 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOO-rALL, PERKIN8 & CO., Gen '1 Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



i#££U: 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

The splendid 3,000 

. ., ton steamers of the 

- - Oceanic Steamship Co. 

sail for HONOLULU, 

vCl AUCKLAND and SYD- 

\9 NEY as under: 

For HONOLULU, 
APIA. AUCKLAND 
and SYDNEY. S. S. 
"MARIPOSA," Jan. 
11th, 2 p. M 
For HONOLULU, 
S. S. •• AUSTRALIA," 

Jan. 20, 1894 
Forpassageand freight 
apply to 
J. D. SPRECKBLS& BROS. CO., 827 Market St. 




SfiVET* * 



Prt c« p«r Copy, 10 C*nts. 



Annual Subscription, S4.00. 




SE^VS; ; ;lETTER 




Vol. XIV 111 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1894. 



Number 2. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred 
Marriott. 60R-609-G13 Merchant Street, San Francisco. En- 
tered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 

The office of the News Letter in Xew York City is at the » Evening 
Post " Building, 204-206 Broadway, Room 1. where information 
may be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 

IF people would talk about pood times instead of hard times, 
what a change there would be! 



MR. LEWELLING says he is ihe Governor of Kansas, and so 
does Mrs. Lease. Now if Mr. L?welling wants to drive Mrs. 
Lease ont of the Capitol, we advise him to go there some morn- 
ing, armed with a small mouse of the parlor species. 



THE United States has five Governors who would do well as 
comic opera artists. Tbey are Governor Pennoyer, of Oregon ; 
Governor Waite, of Colorado; Governor Altgeld, of Illinois; 
Governor LewelliDg, of Kansas, and Governor Mrs. Lease, also 
of Kansas. 



J HALE SYPH.ER, of Washington, D. C, by accusing certain 
. Congressmen and government officials of being in collusion 
with ship-building firms, has accomplished something; he has 
caused it to be known that there is such an insignificant creature 
as a J. Hale Sypher in existence, thus enlarging, however slightly, 
our knowledge of the microscopic world. 



THE announcement that England is to expend £5 000,000 in the 
construction of new battleships will doubtlessly fill the vast 
army of paupers in that country with patriotic enthusiasm. They 
might prefer, it is true, to be filled with bread and beer, but they 
long since learned that, while food of any kind is a luxury, navies 
and armies are a necessity, and that a million empty bellies are 
of less serious import than a single empty exchequer. 'Tis royalty 
and loyalty that make the world go round. 



FROM the realms of the Midwinter Fair comes the Midwinter 
Appeal, edited by Sam Davis. It is a bright little two-page 
sheet, and from the list of contributors published on its front 
page it should sparkle with the best literature that California can 
produce. With Sam Davis at the head the paper is bound to 
accomplish its purpose of reproducing, in the ablest and most 
lurid manner, and with broad burlesque and timely hits, the 
spirit of the early-day mining camp newspaper. 

YESTERDAY the crematory at Cypress Lawn Cemetery incin- 
erated its forty-ninth subject. In view of the fact that the 
crematory has but just begun operations, this is striking evidence 
of the rapid strides into local popularity which this method of dis- 
posing of the dead has made. Reasonable persons understand 
that, from every point of view, cremation is preferable to inter- 
ment, and as the world moves, people are laying aside many of 
tbeir old prejudices, which false sentiment and a deficient under- 
standing permitted to exist. 

THE carelessness of the street railway companies in complying 
with that provision of their franchises which requires them 
to maintain the roadway between the rails and for two feet on 
each side of the track, produced a shocking accident a few days 
ago at the intersection of Seventh and Harrison streets. A horse 
stepped into a hole alongside the rail and had its hoof wrenched 
off. The poor beast was killed, and likely the railroad company 
was made to pay; but the mere fact that these revolting accidents 
are permitted to occur shows a contempt for the public conveni- 
ence and safety that should receive severe punishment. 



IF, as has been declared by a New York preacher, divorce is es- 
sentially polygamy, we then are confronted with the fact that, 
as the spirit of the people is favorable to divorce, it upholds poly- 
gamy. Thus in the moat vital of all sociological problems we ob- 
serve a failure of the Christian influence. It is noted as a peculiar 
fact that no graduate of Vassar has ever been divorced. The only 
conclusion that can be drawn from this is either that the Christian 
influence at Vassar is more potent than in all the churches in the 
country, or that Vassar girls do not marry, or that by some mys- 
terious means they become widows inside of three years after 
marrying. 



THE real reason why Mrs. Madge Kendal declined to write 
sonnet on Henry Irving is because she and the great actor 
have been at Bwords'-pnints from the day when she proclaimed 
that she was the only virtuous woman on the English stage. 



PRAISE to the Lord, Lillian Russell is to be married at last. 
Husbands Russell, Brahatn, Solomon and Coe can now gaze 
with pity and sympathy upon their successor, who bears the eu- 
phonious name of Peiuglni. This wretched Dago who has got 
mixed up in the operatic line, happened, in an unlucky moment, 
to cross the hawse of the Fairy Lillian, and she landed him, just 
for a change. Lillian has arrived at that state of adipose gre*di- 
ness when she's not even suitable for the pictorial advertisement 
of a new cigarette. What she will do as Mrs. Peiugini none can 
tell. She may possibly make a new advertisement by eloping 
with Howell Osborne before the honeymoon is over. 



BOUTELLE, whose exclamatory protests and frantic vocifera- 
tions bad excited grave fears that he aspired to become a 
national nuisance, has turned out to be, after all, simply a Con- 
gressional buffoon ; in which harmless role he may serve, if not to 
instruct, at least to amuse. 

"I do protest," exclaims Boutelle, 
"Against the Speaker's ruling! " 

With keen delight his hearers yell: 
"Give him a cap, give him a bell! 
In all the realms of earth or hell 
Was never heard Buch fooling!" 



DURING a recent storm in Illinois, a liquor saloon, before 
whose doors some local crusaders were vainly praying, was 
struck by lightning and demolished. Surely a most impressive 
moral may be drawn from this incident, and we commend it to the 
attention of the good parsons, in the hope that they will use it for 
the edification of the serious and the salvation of many souls. All 
that we ask is an equitable share of the credit attached to the good 
work ; and to that end we conceive ourselves justly entitled, by 
reason of the convenient form in which we have presented the 
case. What really happened, however, was the destruction by 
lightning, not of the liquor saloon, but of the church whence 
the crusaders bad set out. But mark how heaven set the seal of 
its approval upon their work by not hitting out until they had 
all left the building! 



THE Sacramento Bee proudly announces that, although the 
bids of San Francisco printers were $100 lower than the lowest 
bid of a Sacramento printer on the work of the Bee's excellent 
Midwinter Fair souvenir, it gave the work to the Sacramento 
printer in order solely " to encourage home industry." By pub- 
lishing thac news the Bee accomplishes the following things: 
First, it advertises the fact that San Francisco can do fine print- 
ing at a lower rate than Sacramento, thus probably diverting 
hence the business of people who are not so public-spirited; 
second, it encourages the Sacramento printers to combine and 
raise prices on the Bee and all who may feel as devoted as it does 
to the encouragement of "home industry;" third, it is notice to the 
Sacramento printers that, so far as the Bee and people minded 
like it are concerned, there is no need for increasing the facilities 
and business and bettering the management of their offices in 
order that they might be able to compete with San Francisco. 



WHEN Sacramento became alarmed over the attempt to re- 
move the Capitol to San Jos6 she awoke to her ugliness and 
self-neglect, and immediately began to make improvements. The 
scheme adopted was ingenious and admirable — a committee of 
citizens assessed each property-owner in the city whose property 
amounted to a sum above a certain number of thousands, basing 
the assessment on the official city roll and levying a small per- 
centage to cover the .cost of the improvements. This was fair 
and equitable; and although there could be no legal coercion, 
the matter was handled in such a way through the press as to 
make the owners pay the amounts assessed, or bear a great deal 
of public contempt. There appears to be no reason why a simi- 
lar plan for furnishing work to the unemployed of San Francisco 
could not be made fairer and more effective than the present plan 
of depending solely on the benevolence of the rich without the 
support of a very strong and direct moral pressure. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 13, 1894 : 



AS TO CONGRESS. 

NOT for many years, probably, have thoughtful men viewed 
the proceedings of Congress with more genuine concern than 
now. Never before was the pathway of duty more distinctly blazed 
before a legislative body. The present Congress, fresh from the 
people, has beard their voice and received their mandate upon 
issues that were thoroughly discussed and passed upon in an un- 
mistakable manner. No member of the majority party, not a 
fool or a knave, can pretend to doubt what he was elected to this 
Congress to do. Tbe last national election may fairly be said to 
have been the recording of tbe sober second thought of an excep- 
tionally large majority of our people in regard to a policy lhat bad 
been submitted to them five years previously, and that had in the 
interim been debated from every stump in the land and thrashed 
out with a thoroughness that is too rarely applied to questions of 
great public moment. The duty of the ins is therefore plain be- 
yond tbe possibility of misconception or equivocation. Their 
ability and their willingness to do it are unfortunately becoming 
matters of very serious uncertainty. The condition of the coun- 
try has demanded prompt action ever since last March. The 
President missed his way by not calling Congress to a perform- 
ance of its duty on the day after his inauguration, and Congress 
ignored tbe pressing necessities of the hour when it failed to con- 
tinue its special session until the burning questions just passed 
upon by the country had been disposed of. Worse still, it is now 
toying with the sacred obligations it owes an expectant people in 
a manner well calculated to dishearten intelligent men as to tbe 
ultimate success of representative institutions. With a mandate 
of the first consequence to execute, and with conditions all 
around them that call for promptitude, members are so recreant 
to their trust that they fail to attend in their places and consti- 
tute the quorum necessary to the transaction of public business. 
Such tiifling with the country's well-being would be incredible if 
were not occurring btfore our eyes. Some day, when republics 
learn to treat traitorous servants as kings and kaisers do, such 
faithlessness to public interests and disloyalty to sovereign rights 
will be rendered odious, and, in heated times, perhaps, consti- 
tuted a capital offense. 

Such shameless tergiversation as is now witnessed on the part 
of many Democratic members is not, however, a surprise to tbe 
News Letter, which, in its first issue after Cleveland's inaugura- 
tion, anticipated and predicted that which is now happening. It 
was a by no means difficult prediction to make, even at that early 
day. A fair knowledge of the composition of the House of Repre- 
sentatives sufficed to show that a lot of mediocre men, without 
convictions, had been elected by the tidal wave of Cleveland's 
great popularity. They were not in touch with him, and shared 
not bis earnest purposes or his high resolves. They were carried 
into Congress, io many instances much to their own surprise, 
without knowing tbe how or the why. To their kind had not 
been vouchsafed tbe necessary plummet with which to sound the 
depths of tbe current of earnest popular conviction that was then 
running. Small men without convictions are the most dangerous 
allies a man of purpose can have. As unreliable as fools, and 
more tricky than knaves dare to be, they are likely lo forsake an 
earnest and courageous leader just when be has the most need of 
them. Tbey will run with the hare whilst no danger is near, but 
will turn and hold with the hounds tbe moment they approach. 
That is just about bow it is at this time with a number of Demo- 
cratic Congressmen, who are fooling with the enemy whilst their 
party, through their inaction, is being wrecked and their leader 
in danger of being pushed to tbe wall. The fact is being demon- 
strated that the Democratic party, as it is at present represented 
in Congress, is unworthy of the President whom it was compelled 
by the force of public opinion twice to renominate. Grover 
Cleveland was on both occasions stronger than his party, and he 
is to-day proving greater and stronger. If he had not been sur- 
rounded by the half-hearted crowd that he is, the Hawaiian pol- 
icy of the administration would not now be serving as the shuttle- 
cock to the battledore of partisan misrepresentation and malignity. 
There has been all along moral force enough in it, if properly 
handled and sustained, to have raised it high above tbe effects of 
partisan attack, and, as it is, we have no fear but that in the end 
moral right will prevail. Meanwhile*, however, it appears to have 
been left to the tender mercies of malignants, who will endeavor 
to bedeck it in the habiliments of outrage and wrong, just as 
Liliuokalani ib being pictured as black as a negress, as unwieldy 
as a rhinoceros, and as low-browed as a chimpanzee. Despite 
the habiliments and the pictures, so long as the American people 
remain honest enough to hold that stealing is larceny, so long 
will the President's course, rightly understood, be approved by 
them. Except in so far as the questions of right and wrong affect 
the national reputation, the Hawaiian matter, which promptly 
brings every member to his seat, sinks into utter insignificanoe 
when compared with the overwhelming necessity that exists for 
action upon the tariff that, nevertheless, fails for days together to 
attract a quorum. The business of tbe people must remain more 
or less paralyzed so long as this delay continues. Two weeks' 
debate sufficed for the McKinley bill, which had been suddenly 
sprung upon the country, and certainly a like period ought to dis- 
pose of the Wilson bill. Almost anything is better than this long- 
drawn-out uncertainty. 



MISSIONARY MISREPRESENTATION. 



THE Springfield Republican is too great a newspaper to misrep- 
resent willfully anything, or to consent to have its readers' 
credulity imposed upon by false statements from any quarter. 
That we believe to be its well-earned reputation. Damaging 
statements in its columns are all the more damaging because of 
that fact. For that reason we are moved to warn it that it is fre- 
quently being made the vehicle of slander and misrepresentation 
of the people of San Francisco in regard to their treatment of the 
Chinese. We are all opposed to Chinese immigration because we 
have learned by a bitter experience, happily denied to our con- 
temporary, what it involves and means. Good sound economical 
and moral reasons have made citizens of New England origin as 
much opposed to the residence of Chinese amongst them as are 
all other sections of our liberal, broad-minded and tolerant peo- 
ple. But that opposition does not cause us to forget the duties of 
humanity and of civilization. Our Eastern contemporary is con- 
stantly saying that it does, but that is only because it permits 
itself to be imposed upon by missionary informants, whom it 
naturally enough, yet mistakenly, supposes to be reliable author- 
ities. It is one of tbe sad outcomes of contact with the heathen 
Chinee that in the end it too often drags down others to his level. 
That is the effect it has had on all too many of the so-called mis- 
sionary workers in this city, as we could demonstrate if that 
were worth while. We know whereof we speak. It ia part of 
the " business" to keep Eastern church people stuffed with sym- 
pathy-creating stories. These canse a n spectable newspaper like 
the Republican to print yarns of which the following is the latest 
specimen : " Anti-Chinese prejudice on the Pacific Coast seems to 
be as bitter and unreasonable as the wildest negrophobia of the 
South. A young Chinese woman has been trying to get a medi- 
cal education In San Francisco in order to practice among her own 
people. For three years she has been supporting herself in Chi- 
natown by nursing, but has now made application for admission 
to some of the hospitals of the city only to have her application 
refused because of her race." Without knowing what the facts 
are, we are very sure there is hardly the semblance of truth in 
the story. There is no such woman in Chinatown. The women 
there are not of that kind. They are human chattel-property, 
who have cost their owners all the way from $1500 to $3000 each, 
and are compelled to earn interest upon their capital value, 
which, it is needless to say, cannot be done by nursing the sick. 
We make the suggestion to our contemporary that it probe its 
story to the bottom and give us the benefit of what it discovers. 
We think it would do a service to the cause of truth thereby. 
Somebody has been falsifying, and it would be interesting to 

know who. 

WHAT DOES IT MEAN? 



UNCLE SAM is congregating in the harbor of Rio de Janeiro 
the most powerful American fleet ever gathered in foreign 
waters. At the same time the press dispatches from Washington 
tell us lhat unusually long cable messages are being received 
from that quarter by tbe Navy Department. Captain Picking is 
represented to bave sent 1500 words in one day, and to have been 
replied to at almost equal length, after earnest interviews between 
certain members of tbe Cabinet and the President. There may 
be no trouble ahead, but there is undoubtedly something in the 
wind. Minister Thompson appears to be set aside as not strong 
enough to handle tbe matters now pending, whatever they may 
happen *,o be, and our naval officers alone are consulted. The 
dimensions of the fleet now at Rio are certainly suspicious. The 
San Francisco, Charleston, Detroit and Newark were already there 
without attracting special attention, but when orders were issued 
for the New York to join tbem and for the Mianlonomah to proceed 
to Trinidad and await further instructions, it became plain that 
Rio harbor contained more of interest for our people than they 
had supposed it did. So great a display of strength at this time, 
at that point, means something, though we do not pretend to 
know what. The Son Francisco and the Newark are 4083 ton pro- 
tected cruisers, carrying each twelve six-inch rifles, with eighteen 
pieces in tbe secondary battery. The former has a trial-speed 
record of over 20 knots and the latter of 19. The Charleston, of 
4040 tons and 18 knots, carries two eigbt-inch and six six-inch 
ritles, with eighteen pieces in the secondary battery. The Detroit, 
of 2000 tons and 18J knots, carries ten five-inch rapid-fire rifles, 
with eighteen pieces in tbe secondary battery. The 8150 ton 
armored cruiser New York, of 21 knots, is by far the finest vessel 
we have in commission, and with her six eight-inch and twelve 
four inch ritles in the main battery, her armored barbettes, turrets 
and sides, her great steaming radius, and her high speed, she will 
be tbe crack ship of war at Rio. The Miantonomah, slow but 
powerful, with her four big ten-inch guns mounted in turrets 
nearly a foot thick, and with her low armored sides making a 
difficult mark to hit, completes the array, unless, indeed, the 
report be true that the gun-boat Yorktown has been ordered from 
European waters to increase it. Winter usually sees the home 
squadron in Gulf waters, and it would be interesting to know 
why Ric is deemed just now a more urgent rendezvous. Is it 
only a dress parade, or does it mean business? Is the Monroe 
doctrine in danger, or what? 



Jan 18, 1891 



s.w FRANCISCO NEWS l ETTER. 



THE KODAK IN THE PULPIT. 



THKKK ig now every probability of the amateur c«nier» invad- 
log the pulpit and taking its place as a realistic evangelistic 
agent in all congregations, and :! the governing bodies ol the 
churches once grasp the full possibilities of this Instrumentality, 
there can be no doubt that the useful little ■nnrhine will have 
found a permanent place. Ministers occasionally take a holiday, 
and. like the more worldly man ol business, sometimes make a 
pilgrimage to the far away Bible lands, and on their return deliver 
the usual course ol lectures on ihe present condition and histor- 
ical associations of Jordan. Jerusalem, Nazareth, Bethlehem and 
other sacred places of Palestine. Hut now that the useful little 
camera forms part of the traveling equipment of so many tour- 
ists, who formerly provided themselves only with binoculars and 
guide-books by way of outfit, most lecturers illustrate their nar- 
ratives with stereoptican views of the different scenes and people 
encountered on the way; and it is now proposed that all 
preachers who wish to make a Soriptnral place or group mater- 
ialise itself to their congregations, should take lantern slides with 
them into the pulpit, and then, instead of giving a mere verbal 
tumid description of the scene, all they would have to do would 
be just to turn down the lights and throw the picture on the can- 
vas. Thus, for instance, a charily sermon would be illustrated 
by graphic representations of the miseries of the poor, and the 
changes brought about by the liberal bestowal of timely relief 
could be depicted by cunningly devised movable slides. In the 
Bame way social, temperance and other sermons could be illus- 
trated after the manner of magic lantern lectures. Indeed, there 
appears to be a very difficult matter to set bounds to one's imag- 
ination of the powers of a reliable camera if used by a fearless 
preacher for the purpose of infusing a proper Christian spirit into 
his congregation. Snap-shots of inattenlive members of the con- 
gregation could be taken from the pulpit and exposed on the 
canvas the following 8unday, as a warning to elderly gentlemen 
who dared to slumber during the sermon, or to the fashionable 
lady who is so much absorbed by the trimming of her neighbor's 
new hat that she pays no attention whatever to the parson's 
good words. A good front view of the close-fisted gentleman 
caught in the act of searching the corners of his pockets for a 
nickel or a dime, while he joins in the refrain of the closing 
hymn, would also be a fetching picture, and would prove very 
nseful if kept in reserve for the next discourse on covetousness. 
Snap-shot pictures of church congregations have seldom been pro- 
duced since the days of Hogarth, but there is very little doubt 
that if taken they would subsequently command a ready sale at 
church fairs and charitable bazaars; for who could resist the un- 
christian desire of obtaining one at any price? 



CANDIDATES FOR GOVERNOR. 

POLITICAL gossip in these dull and piping times creeps into 
the clubs, and the latest among those who make conversation 
is about the Governor. Now, some prominent Republicans assert 
that there is going to be the deuce to pay, and no pitch pot in 
their convention. Mr. E. B. Preston, of San Mateo county, is a 
candidate for Governor, and Mr. Preston's following assert that 
they will not consider anybody else, and that if anybody else 
is even on the brink of nomination, they will walk out of 
the hall. Mr. James W. Sperry, a prominent member of the Pro- 
duce Exchange, and one of the owners of Sperry's flour mills, is 
also a prominent candidate before the Republican convention. 
Mr. Sperry is a man of intelligence, and would, in addition to his 
city vote, command a big indorsement in the country. On the 
Democratic side, Mr. Bernard D. Murphy, of Santa Clara, is the 
most prominent. Mr. Murphy is a man of many friends, and has 
served with distinction in the Legislature. Mr. Hale is mentioned 
also, but Preston and Sperry on the Republican side, and Murphy 
on the Democratic, are the men of the club talk. 



CONCERNING MR. TOWNE. 

IT has become the habit of the local daily press to announce 
every month or two that A. N. Towne is to retire or be retired 
from the Southern Pacific Company, and the company's and Mr. 
Towne's denials have little effect. While there is nothing unrea- 
sonable In the supposition that any mau, after accumulating 
wealth, might retire from business and take his ease, the popular 
commotion created by rumors of this kind, as they affect Mr. 
Towne, indicate the great interest which his connection with the 
company has for the public. It is a common belief that a man 
without enemies is a man without friends; but it is a remarkable 
fact that in the handling of the broad ethical problems which 
arise in the adjustment of great transportation interests to the 
public welfare, Mr. Towne always has been regarded by the peo- 
ple with conspicuous confidence and affection, as a friend. With 
him firmness has never meant stubbornness, nor power arrogance. 
It is the broad, generous and wise humanity in him that has en- 
deared him to the people, and they would regard his retirement 
as a loss to them. 



AN AFFRONT TO DECENCY. 

THK public is not generally aware that in all cases of murder, 
such, for Instance, as that of young Poole, the Coroner ol this 

illy ot his assistants are In Ihe habit ol making as full and thor- 
ough an examination ol Ihe body as in the case of death (rem na- 
known canaee, where tool play is suspected. Young Poole was 
Shot through the temple and thus killed almost Instantly, and 
yet it was deemed necessary to inspect all the internal organs for 
evidences of disease, which, if such existed, should, under the cir- 
cumstances, carry no weight wilh an intelligent jury. When a 
man's career is cut short by an ounce of lead in Ihe brain, it mat- 
ters not that his days were already numbered by valvular disease 
of the heart, a hob-nailed liver, or kidney troubles. Wby, then, 
should the body of an unfortunate be mangled under the sur- 
geon's knife, unless it be that desirable oppor'unities in the way 
of a fresh cadaver are not sufficiently frequent at the Morgue to 
keep a set of junior surgeons in practice at dissection ? The ex- 
cuse offered is that the law requires the Coroner to be in a position 
to swear positively that the viclim's death could not have been 
precipitated by some latent malady, when the bullet of the mur- 
derer penetrated a vital spot. This is about as sensible as tbe 
" heart failure," to which nine-tenths of the physicians nowadays 
ascribe the death of patients, no matter though the fatality be 
due to typhoid fever, consumption, or an overdose of their own 
physic. The fashion in vogue here is simply a relic of the barbar- 
ism countenanced in the days when a vigilant committee was 
the chief regulator of public and private morality. It is high time 
that it was reformed in keeping with other modern innovations 
in behalf of decency. 



IRELAND'S DAY AT THE FAIR. 



IT was a happy inspiration which led the Irish-Americans of 
this city to select St. Patrick's Day (March 17th) as Ireland's 
day at the Midwinter Fair. Judge Tobin, who presided at the 
meeting of Irish-Americans at the Occidental Hotel Wednes- 
day evening, appointed the following committee of fifteen to take 
charge of the celebration: J. J. O'Brien, Jeremiah Mahoney, 
Thomas R. Bannerman, Colonel Thomas F. Barry, William Brod- 
erick, Dr. M. C. O'Toole, James R. Kelly, Judge M. Cooney, Jere- 
miah Deasy, Judge J. Stafford, Michael Meagher, James C. Nea- 
lon, John Mulhern, Colonel J. C. O'Connor, T.J. Welch, Frank 
T. Shea, Colonel John O'Byrne, Judge Robert Tobin, William F. 
Stafford, R. C. O'Connor. All the Irish societies will unite in 
assisting to make this a memorable day in the history of Irish 
celebrations. The selection of J. J. O'Brien as chairman of the 
committee was a brilliant stroke on Judge Tobin's part, for it 
assures the unqualified success of this, the most brilliant Irish 
celebration that California ever shall have seen. Although a 
thorough American, Mr. O'Brien cherishes that laudable affec- 
tion for the country of his birth which is the foundation of all 
good citizenship. Associated with him on the committee are 
men wisely chosen for their possession of the qualities which 
are so conspicuous in him, and hence there is every assurance 
that other nations will have to put forth extraordinary efforts to 
approach the excellence of the Ireland's day celebration. 

A PECULIAR POLICY. 



MANY protests are being made by residents of this city at the 
action of the Executive Committee of the Midwinter Fair 
in importing men from the East to fill high-salaried positions, the 
duties of which could be filled by any number of intelligent young 
Californians. The best places in the gift of the management have 
been filled in this way, and apologists for the Executive Com- 
mittee defend the appointments on the sole ground that there 
were so many local applicants that to have selected one would 
have made enemies of all the disappointed candidates. Three 
cases In point are those of E. A. Felder, who was brought from 
South Carolina to act as Chief of the Department of Admissions, 
his duties being to issue passes and keep a record of the daily 
number of visitors. Paul Black mar was imported from Chicago, 
as Superintendent of Collections, to see that the management gets 
its share, 25 per cent, of profits, from the various concessions. 
D. E. Cash, Superintendent of Concessions, is another Eastern 
man brought hither to fill a high-salaried place, which a San Fran- 
ciscan should have received. No special experience is necessary 
for any of these appointments. A worse feature still is the fact 
that each of these officials brought his assistants from the East. 
Cash has given employment to four Eastern men as subordinates, 
Felder to three, and Blackmar to as many more. And this while 
so many clerks and accountants are out of employment. 

THAT French and British soldiers engaged in the humanitarian 
work of shooting down the inhabitants of Africa, should have 
unintentionally shot bullets into each other instead, is something 
intensely sad to contemplate. It is to be hoped that this horrible 
tragedy will not be permitted to shake the noble purpose of these 
two Christian nations to exterminate the idolatrous negro at any 
cost, and to plant the banner of the Cross upon the soil now 
desecrated by his wooden-headed gods. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 13, 1894. 



A LETTER FROM PARIS. 

Paris, December 16, 1893. 

WITH the lightness of heart characteristic of the French nation, 
we quickly got over the scare caused by the dynamite ex- 
plosion in the Chamber of Deputies. There have been some 
curious facts in connection with the outrage, which have caused 
some little amusement in American circles. You must know 
that the names of all the people in the House at the time were 
carefully taken down. One lady atone having very strongly ex- 
pressed a wish to remain incognito, the Paris officials, ever gal- 
lant, respected her request, but somewhat mischievously men- 
tioned that an American lady withheld her name in consequence 
of her appearance in the chamber, which had nothing to do with 
political matters. Before long, however, it was whispered, with 
many side glances and smiles, that a well-known charming 
American had come to the Chamber by appointment with one of 
our most popular Deputies, while she was supposed to be visiting 
her dearest friend in Chantilly. It is scarcely necessary to say 
that the lady is married, and all Paris, with the exception of htr 
husband, now knows her name. 

The Baroness Morio de 1'Isle is preparing a somewhat sensa- 
tional inauguration of her weekly receptions. The white and 
gold drawing-room in the Rue de I'Universitie" is to be trans- 
formed into a cafe-concert, where many of our celebrated inon- 
daines with a talent for songs and recitations, a la Ivette Gnilbert 
& Balthy, are to vie with their sisters at the Eldorado, and appear 
on a platform, erected at the further end of the room, in all their 
diamonds and with as many blushes as they can command for 
the occasion. The spectators will be seated at little tables, and 
refreshments will be served by the prettiest and youngest of the 
Baroness's male and female acquaintance, dressed as waiters and 
soubrettes. The only cloud which veils the prospect of the an- 
ticipated pleasure is, that we have all just been re-vaccinated, 
most of us on our arms. Fortunately, Madame la Mode has de- 
creed that our evening dresses shall be adorned with full sleeves, 
or the trouble would indeed be great. And that there is cause 
for this precaution against the most terrible of illnesses is evident, 
not from any details we read in the papers, but because we find 
all our friends in every quarter of the city have all simultaneous- 
ly had recourse to the preventive measure. 

Madame Sarah Bernhardt is having a brilliant success in her 
old repertory at the Renaissance. Dumas, who in himself is as 
young as his play, makes no secret that before he wrote the Dame 
aux Camellias, he had no idea of his talent as a dramatic author. 
At twenty years of age he was largely in debt, and it was with 
the intention of paying his creditors that he commenced to write. 
Satisfied that there muat be some trick, some recipe for a theatri- 
cal piece of which authors alone had the secret, he betook him- 
self to his father, and asked him how to write a play. " It is 
very simple," answered the father: "First act. clear; third act, 
short; and wit throughout." 1 spent a delightful evening with 
him last week. M. Dumas, now seventy years old, still resem- 
bles the photographs taken at different periods of his life. The 
moustache and hair are as white as snow, but he retains his 
solid form and is as upright as ever. He is a remarkably quick 
worker, and his manuscripts, which be showed me, are models of 
neatness. La Dame aux Camellias is written on two packets of 
large paper of different sizes. He was in too great a hurry to 
seek for any particular dimension, and so he took the first that 
came to hand, and for pages there is not a single correction, not 
a word struck out. The second act of this masterpiece was writ- 
ten in four hours. The Demi-Monde, on the other hand, took him 
eleven months, working seven or eight hours a day. But La Dame 
aux Camellias remains young and warm, as if it had but just 
emanated from the author's brain, because it treats of a sincere 
passion. In depicting Marguerite, his thoughts were with a 
woman he had known, a real woman, an actress from the 
Com^die Franraise, whom be bad loved, and whom he would 
have married and strangled, if we are to believe his own words. 
Whose pupil is Mile. Calve, the charming diva who is receiving 
so warm a welcome at present from the American public? The 
question will prove interesting, not only because it is "up to 
date," but because two eminent -professors, two celebrities, 
Madame Marches! and Madame Laborde, are claiming the honor 
of having produced such a brilliant artiste as Mile. Calv6. The 
case is so eagerly discussed in musical circles that I resolved to 
interview both professors and place their evidence before my 
American friends, relying on their shrewd judgment to detect the 
truth. 

Mme. Laborde speaks: "Certainly, Mile Calve is my pupil. She 
came to me on the 23d of March, 1S86, prior to her journey to 
Italy. I taught her Les Pecheurs de Perles, which she sang In a 
little town near Milan, of which I have forgotten the name. From 
that time she has remained under my care, and has studied with 
me Cavalleria Rusticana, Carmen, and also other operas which she 
has never sung in Paris. Before joining the operatic stage, she 
was learning with Mr. Pujet who has since died." 

Mme. Marchesi's version: "Surely you do not mean to tell 
me that any one would seriously doubt the fact of Emma Calve" 
being my pupil! Look at this letter." And Mme. Marches! 
showed me a short note of M. Gevaert, the famous composer 



and director of fbe Brussels Conservatoire, dated the 9th of May, 
1882, wherein he requests her to receive Mile. Calve" in her oper- 
atic class. " When the young girl arrived," Mme. Marches! pro- 
ceeded, "I found that her voice was very tired, and 1 had to pre- 
scribe her absolute rest for two months before attempting to pose 
her voice. Mile. Calve" set to work with a will, and for two con- 
secutive years studied very hard indeed, with excellent results. 
On the 16th of December, 1884, she made her debut at the Italiens 
in Aben Named, and then signed an engagement at the Opera 
Comique, when she appeared on the 11th of March in Le Chevalier 
Jean. Sonzogno then engaged her for La Scala in Milan, and 
until 1887 she remained under my tuition." 

"Excuse me, Madame Marcbesi, but I understood from Mme. 
Laborde that on the 23d of March, 1886, Mile. Calv6 became her 
pupil." 

" That point can be easily settled. I will show you a letter 
Emma Calve" wrote me from Milan. You see it is dated the 11th 
of January, 1887." 

I looked at the document, aod must own that I felt puzzled. 
" My dear Madame," it ran, » your pupil has scored a victory. 
The papers here all say I have a fine voice, and, above all, an ex- 
cellent method. This is meant for you, my beloved friend, who 
have made me what I am, and I thank you from all my heart. 
I have improved very much, not only in my singing, but also in 
my acting, for I have carefully studied my role. You see, I ought 
to feel very happy with the result of my debut, and as it is 
through you I came here, you may rest assured that I shall for- 
ever feel grateful to you." 

I silently returned the letter. 

" From that moment," said Madame Marchesi, "I have not 
seen Emma CalveV' Chkysantheme. 



Natural and Artificial Dryness of Champagne. 



AS the tendency and taste of the public are towards dryer cham- 
pagnes, this questions comes up for daily discussion. 

A wine can be made to taste very dry. although containing consid- 
erable sugar, by the addition of alcohol, as is the case with some of the 
so-called "brut" wines. Natural dryness and the smallest percent- 
age of alcohol constitute the conditions of a wholesome cham- 
pagne. 

Dr. Thomas King Chambers, Honorary Physician to the Prince of 
Wales, says: " Champagne with a minimum of alcohol is by far the 
wholesoraest, and possesses remarkable exhilarating power." 

Prof. R. Ouden Dobemus, in his chemical analysis of the most 
prominent brands of champagnes, states: " I find 6, H. Mumm & 
Co.'s Extra Dry to contain, in a marked degree, less alcohol than the 
others. I therefore most cordially commend it, not only for its 
purity, but as the most wholesome of the champagnes." 

Custom House statistics for 1893 show G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Extra 
Dry far ahead of all its competitors, its importations aggregating 71,751 
cases, being more than one-fourth of all combined, and 25,951 cases 
more than any other brand. While words tell, statistics prove, and 
the best evidence for unexcelled quality, purity, natural dryness and 
wholesomeness that can be produced, is given by the success of this 
favorite wine. 

Highest award for excellence and purity was received at Columbian 
World's Fair for G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Extra Dry. 




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YOU 
SHOULD 

KNOW 

THE 

BANJO. 



Ashton P. Stevens 

Has Resumed Instruction 

26 MONTGOMERY ST., 
Room No. S, 



Jan 13, 1894. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KI 



LEND A HAND 



[Bt Dl VII50K.1 



Wl are til apt to shirk our responsibilities. ••An I my 
brother's keeper? 1 ' we a«k each other with an emphasis that 
is at once a denial and an excuse. St. Paul answered the ques- 
tion by his assertion that no man liveth or dielh to himself 
alone, and Editor Stead raised a slorni of indignation about bis 
head when he declared that the [ady clad in silk and satins, and 
in her own righteousness as a garment, was often more of a 
moral leper than the woman of ihe town. It is ft far cry from 
one of the Four Hundred to the dregs of society, and yet the dis- 
tance, when measured by moral responsibility, may be less than 
we think. 

These are annoying questions for us to consider, and we would 
rather not have them thrust upon us. It would be pleasanter for 
many of us if we could live like Uasselas, or like Prince Gautama 
in "The Light of Asia." in absolute ignorance of the misery, sin, 
and suffering that in this world abound. But even to those 
mortals, favored as they were, that knowledge had to come, and 
so we cannot hope by shutting tbe eye or closing the ear to ex- 
clude all cognizance of what is going on in the world. To their 
credit, be it said, many seek to alleviate as much of the misery as 
lies witbin their power. But often, with the best intentions in 
tbe world, their efforts do m .ire barm than good, simply because 
they are misdirected. 

During tbe last few years a great advaace has been made in 
the disbursement of charity. Tbe work has been systematized 
to such a degree that the chances for successful imposture have 
been lessened. One of the important truths most emphasized by 
those experienced in the work of relief is that tbe indiscriminate 
giving of food, money, clothing — of giving, instead of allowing 
the recipient to earn what he needs — is productive of evil. It 
has a pauperizing tendency. Bat to some it is easier to give five 
dollars than to spend five minutes in thinking of how to help a 
deserving applicant to help himself. "I will give my money," I 
have heard more than one rich woman say, ''but I cannot come 
and work with you in the society. I cannot be bothered with 
such cases." 

There are many who are wilting to give their money, who 
always have their own trumpeter with them to sound forth the 
praises of their generosity. That is not the spirit of giving. There 
are too many who expect a visible return for all tbat they give. 
The incense of appreciation, of praise, of gratitude is sweet to 
those who have received it. They wish to prolong the pleasure. 
Consequently we find our rich people giving where the gift will 
cau*e an excitement of thanks, or more yet where they will own 
the recipients body and soul. There are rich women who pose as 
benefactors because they throw open their houses to an occa- 
sional fashionable tea for a swell charity, who think, because they 
have a throng of young girls in their train, dependent upon their 
bounty, lhat they are doing wonders for their day and gener- 
ation. 

The other day a man of the world handed me a slip cut from 
the social column of an Eastern paper. It was a puff for a society 
■woman who had taken six girls from a countiy town to spend 
the winter with her in Washington. " Read that stuff," said he 
in accents of disgust, "and tell me if you call that woman a bene- 
factress to those young girls. Here she has taken them from 
their humble surroundings. She has placed them in a position 
which to fill even for a season they must become dependents 
upon her for everything — house, home, clothing, food — for every- 
thing. What has she done for those girls? Nothing. Worse 
than nothing. She has harmed them. They never can be as 
happy as once they were in their own sphere. They will sigh 
for the gaieties, tbe fine clothes, the flesh pots of this latter day 
Egypt. Into their lives she has introduced an element of discon- 
tent that will keep them miserable all the rest of their days." 

"Perhaps," said I, "you have taken a pessimistic view of the 
situation. Suppose we grant that this lady has regarded marriage 
as the aim and object of woman's life. Perhaps she thought that 
by a winter in Washington she could marry off her charges and 
so provide for their future." 

"Possibly," said the man of the world;, "but every such scheme 
as that is not crowned with success. I'll be bound, too, that 
those girls had to become toadies of the baldest sort; had to 
write notes, and be ladies' maids and companions, and genera! 
entertainers, and all that sort of thing. No girl can be the recip- 
ient of that sort of charity without losing a large part of her self- 
respect. How much better if an attempt could be made to help 
girls to help themselves I" 

There is the point. So little of the help that is offered or 
bestowed has a thought beyond the glorification of the giver. 
There are numbers of proud, high-spirited, sensitive girls who 
would scorn to be this one remove from a lady's maid, who are 
not too proud to earn their own living. Newspaper offices could 
act as a directory for such young women were they so inclined; 
for it is to the profession of journalism that these girls who can 
do nothing else turn with a pitiful confidence in their untried 
ability to earn their living by their pen. "My friends all say 



tbat I write such interesting letters." Is their introduction of 
themselves, "and I always was considered one of the best com- 
position writers In school." Poor girls! It Is pitiful— their num- 
bers, their need, their failures! 

Now if our rich women would help such girls, not only by 
establishing scholarships in college^, where their own names 
will be written in marble in the college halls, but if they would 
help a girl to get where she can help herself ! Take the profession 
of nursing. It has been called the ideal work for women. It 
takes two years to learn. Many a girl would take It up if she 
only could contribute a little to the support of a widowed mother, 
a sick sister, or the little ones of the family, while she is learning 
her chosen profession. There is no way that this can be done, 
and so she drudges on or — well, one cannot calmly contemplate 
the full extent of the alternative to which a young woman, 
hemmed in on all .-ides by adverse circumstances, must face. 

Cannot «ome of our wealthy women help such girls? Not by a 
gift of tbe money, but by a loan to be repaid at leisure. It would 
do more for tbe development of the girl than two winters in Wash- 
ington as a toady, and It would not cost much more. There is 
here a suggestion for our benevolently inclined. Will they carry 
it out? 



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AT THE MIDWINTER FAIR 

THE EXHIBIT OF 

DOXSEE'S PURE CLAM JUICE, 

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Office of ) 

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and seeing the manner in which the clams and juice are prepared for the 
market. The steaming process employed destroys all germ life; and I can 
testify to the absolute purity of the juice -no adulterants beii g used. 

J. L. HALSEY, M. D. 
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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEBl 



Jan . 13, 1894. 




WD 



We Obev no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



HENRY ARTHUR JONES is a playwright "to the manner 
born" as well as trained by study and inclination; and he is 
something more— a man with a purpose, or rather many pur- 
poses. Into each of his plays he has wrought some central idea, 
not with any apparent view to point a set or defined moral, 
it is true; but the auditor is made to think, and as the thought 
develops into opinion on the theme involved, the moral points itself. 
The Dancing Girl, now being played at the Baldwio, has this 
special element less clearly and saliently set forth than other 
plays by Mr. Jones which have been seen here; but the philo- 
sophic auditor will find the " central idea " perhaps rather in the 
question of suicide than in the duty of a landlord to his tenantry, 
a point of less interest in America than in a country where the 
former is virtually owner of the latter, so far as its condition is 
concerned. The growing power of our great manufacturers and 
railroad magnates renders even this question not wholly without 
its value as a lesson or a study. 

But whatever its moral value, a point with which art-criticism 
has, strictly speaking, nothing to do except as it affects the inter- 
est and truth to nature, the relation between seignor and vassal 
gives a natural pivot on which much of Guiseberry's life-story 
turns. Mr. Jones has drawn in Lord Guiseberry a character 
powerful with the power of reserved force. There is no rant, no 
fiery outburst, no set speeches either of self-denunciation or re- 
solve. But in the clearly defined effect of the picture, however 
few the lines, lie the strength and skill of the limner. It is "the 
portrait of a gentleman," as the art catalogues say; and the 
picture is intensely dramatic while entirely possible and repre- 
sentative. The part is well suited to Mr. Wilton Lackaye, who, 
without effort, brings out each changing mood, the gradual 
awakening to the nothingness of his life, and its outcome in the 
rash impulse to "his quietus make," with the same direct aim 
which hits the mark of sympathy, that characterizes the work of 
the author. Even the intent to end his own life does not excite 
the contempt which is its usual effect on sensible minds. In one 
brief sentence he reveals his own realization of the fact that "the 
coward sneaks to death; the brave live bravely on." by his plea 
in extenuation that none will be affected by his death. His 
silent thought on the stairs, his wordless farewell to life, are far 
more powerful appeals to the sympathy of the audience than the 
most heroic declamation. But only an artist could make them 
felt as does Mr. Lackaye, and this one delineation will form a 
strong subornation of San Francisco's good opinion for his subse- 
quent work here. 

The serious question of the duties and obligations between 
power and dependence finds an exposition in more than one 
phase of The Dancing Girl — that of parent and child, for one. The 
plea of the wantonly cruel and defiant daughter that her father, 
in restricting her youthful exuberance of life within too narrow 
limits, caused its fatal bursting of all bounds, however inade- 
quate, is not without its suggestion. The scene in which the 
father and daughter meet, when the shameful fact of her mode of 
life so shamelessly revealed strikes upon him like a death blow, 
gives an opportunity for J. H. Stoddart's unequaled work in this 
line, while it reveals in Miss Arthur almost tragic possibilities. 
Her very voice, throughout the play, shows an artistic study and 
comprehension. It is hard and metallic even in the earlier scenes, 
and its harshly vibrating tones, as she herself hardens and becomes 
coarser in the evil atmosphere she has chosen to dwell in, form a 
powerful adjunct to the portrayal. E. M. Bell has a strongpartin 
John Christison, and plays it with a depth and force which render 
more surprising his ineffective work as Lord Windermere. Miss 
Ida Conquest plays with bright simplicity and much feeling the 
pretty part of Sybil Drake, which ruijs through the play like a 
limpid rill through a malarious marsh. E. M. Holland gives the 
benefit of his characteristic seemingly unconscious humor (so in- 
finitely more amusing than its more demonstrative congener) to 
a character but indifferently furnished with the humorous ele- 
ment, and Mrs. D. P. Bowers appears as a caustic woman of the 
world for one short scene, but with her unfailing effectiveness. 
The cast is a very long one, but the other characters require no 
special mention. 

As was the case with Lady Windermere's Fan, no small share of 
the complete production rests with Messrs. E. W. Presbrey and 
Herbert Millward. The scenic setting and staging are thoroughly 
appropriate as well as effective, the ballroom Bcene in the third 
act being probably the best managed and most natural thing of 
the kind yet seen on the local stage. 

The faults of the play are few, but they are glaring ones, and 
entirely inexplicable in the light of the author's experience and 
ability. The incongruities seem to cluster mainly around one 
of the most attractive creations of the play, Sybil Drake. That 
this young and innocent girl should be always wandering about 
alone and unprotected, and visiting, apparently, in the house of a 



woman of Drusilla Ives' character — the house, in fact, of Lord 
Guiseberry himself — is sufficiently startling; but when she lingers 
(uncloaked and evidently prepared to stay) in a bachelor's apart- 
ments after midnight, when all the other guests have departed, 
even the necessity of being on hand to save " Guise" from sui- 
cide will not enable Mr. Jones to explain it away, at least to the 
satisfaction of the women in the house. The acceptance by so 
severe a moralist as old David Ives of Guiseberry's offer of mar- 
riage (after seven years of unmarriage, ao to speak, with Dru- 
silla) as a complete exoneration of his lordship from all complic- 
ity in the girl's ruin, is another patent absurdity, and others less 
obtrusive might be mentioned. 

The players have one fault in common, a fault equally notice- 
able at the company's last visit here. It is a serious one, and 
should be corrected at once by the one whose province it is to 
correct such errors. The people speak in tones which hardly 
reach the audience, and with an enunciation which ranges from in- 
distinctness to utter unintelligibility. The constant strained effort 
to bear is so unpleasant as seriously to mar the enjoyment even 
of the best performance. Mrs. Bowers and Mr. Bell are honor- 
able exceptions, and their appearance is hailed as a transient re- 
lief. Any one who professes to hear more than a chance word 
here and there of Mr. Stoddard's discourse, must have an ear- 
trumpet or an elastic conscience, and as his work is always so 
admirable, the inability to bear him is all the more exasperating. 
"Quiet," the present fad, is a good quality on the stage, as else- 
where, but when an actor is so quiet that we can't hear him, the 
fad may be pronounced overdone. 

* * » 

There is a bit of unintended "funny business'" at the end of 
the first act of The Dancing Girl which should be eliminated as 
seriously marring an otherwise effective climax. It is the short 
'■shadow dance" with which the vain Drusilla proposes to startle 
her wavering lover. It certainly "startled" the audience, and 
that it did not complete Guiseberry's disentbrallment must be 
attributed to the sudden fall of the curtain ; for a more ridiculous 
attempt at a dance was probably never seen on any stage. John 
Christison's question, put in tones of awful solemnity, "Woman, 
what art thou?" would have better voiced the astonished 
curiosity of the audience had he made it, "Woman, what is it?" 
To compare Miss Arthur's pas with that of a marionette would 
be to cast an unmerited slur on this ingenious piece of mechan- 
ism. Happily the curtain falls quickly on the angular pose and 
awkward stamping of "the dancing (?) girl," but not soon enough 
by at least fifty-nine seconds. Miss Arthur should learn a little 
dance or omit it altogether as a needless temptation to impolite 
laughter on the part of the audience. 

* * # 

Barlow Brothers' Minstrels at the California have been demon- 
strating the double fact that minstrelsy, as a branch of the 
dramatic art, is in an advanced stage of decadence, and that the 
public taste still clings to that form of amusement. Scofield, the 
juggler, and Scott, "the frog," are clever in their lines, bot the 
performance as a whole accentuates the fact first mentioned 
above. Next Monday night The Ensign, a naval drama founded 
on the Mason-Slidell episode, and one of the best of last season's 
plays, returns to the California. 

The Tivoli has found its bright and lively spectacular operetta 
so decided and sustained a success that it will be continued 
another week. The transformation scene, a series of brilliant 
pictures of the Midwinter Fair, is an especial attraction. 

# » * 

AtStockwell'a Fanny Rice is still drawing good houses with 
Miss Innocence Abroad. 

# * * 

Miss Ethel Brandon, under the management of Mr. Frank L. 
Hoogs, has started on a playing tour of Southern California, her 
two very successful weeks at Eureka justifying the more extended 
venture. Eureka has, by the way, one of the finest theatres in 
the State, furnished with all the newest lighting and mechanical 
appliances, and with the equally important adjunct of an enter- 
prising manager, who is also the owner. The consequence is 
that the very best traveling attractions are glad to include Eureka 
in the bookings. 

At the first Carr-Beel concert of the coming seasou, which is set 
for the 20th inst., at Golden Gate Hall, the entire afternoon will 
be devoted to Grieg, the programme being as follows: Romance 
for two pianos (Grieg's latest work) rendered by Mrs. Carmichael- 
Carr and Miss Hulda Andersen; the beautiful string quartette 
(repeated by special request) by Messrs. Beel, Wismer, Jaulus, and 
Heine; and the sonata in A major, for piano and violin, by Mrs. 
Carr and Mr. Beel. The resumption of the delightful "pops" 
will be a welcome event to our music-lovers. 

• # * 

The steady increase of the visitors to the Yosemite Cyclorams,, 
corner of Market and Tenth streets, is evidence of the profound 
impression which this stupendous masterpiece of delineative art 
has created. It is a treat both to those who have seen and those 
who have never seen the real Yosemite. 



Jan. 13, 1894. 



BAN v\\ INCISCO NEWS LETTEB 



STUDYING FUR THE OPERATIC STAGE. 

ONK of Ihe questions mo»l -quenlly asked profession*! 
■innera is, •* How do you feel w hen you first come upon the 
stage? " Very few people have any conception of the dread of 
that first plunge into depths of tin known woe. 

In the first place, if one could only go before a public disencum- 
bered of one's arms and legs, the feeling of nervousness would be 
lessened about ninety-nine per cent. One's hands seem to grow 
to twice their natural size, and positively reluse to find any re- 
pose, and one's legs and feel have a pleasant little way of falling 
over each other, getting tied into strange knots, and refusing to 
get ont of each other's way. Of course, experience lessens all 
these unpleasant sensations, and little by little an artist finds the 
desired repose of manner so necessary to the body, before any 
effect can be made with the voice. Hut the period spent in learn- 
ing how to get on and off (he stace. even the concert stage, is a 
period filled with dread and general nightmare, and no one but an 
artist that has gone through the uncomfortable experience can so 
fully sympathize with the painful struggles of those seeking the 
desired repose. 

Those who attempt to study for the stage are at once robbed of 
their conviction that they know how to get in and out of a room 
with an ordinary amount of ease. The first lesson that ao ambi- 
tious singer must take is in walking upon the stage. I have 
heard Giraudet say again and again to his pupils, " If you walked 
on the stage as you walk in real life, your every movement 
would be greeted with a burst of laughter." A few such remarks 
soon take the conceit out of the most egotistical of students. They 
are thus reduced to the proper state of mind to become the pupils 
of the most exacting of teachers. 

Then they are taught how to step, how to raise the arm, to 
lower the arm, how long a stride to take, and many other little 
items of which the public have no conception as they sit lookiDg 
at an artist moving about the stage. 

In Giraudet's class of acting, or his " Cour," as we called it 
there, was a young Frenco girl, who had a most exquisite voice, 
but whose histrionic ability was very embryonic ? Poor Giraudet 
would become more and more exasperated as each day this future 
Palti made the same atrocious movements, and finally, in trying 
to teach her to fall gracefully, he became wildly excited, and, 
giving her an emphatic push, cried out, " Oh, fall! fall! have pity 
on this suffering Cour and fall!" and the poor struggling Aida 
gave a wild shriek, shockingly flat, and determined to be laughed 
at no longer, came down with full force, shaking the stage and 
everything on it. The burst of laughter in which we all indulged, 
together with the smarting reminder of how ridiculous it all must 
have been, caused the young lady's absence from the Cour for 
some weeks. 

Many people think that all an artist has to do is to " learn the 
music " of his roles. This is a great mistake. The singing is 
indeed only a small part of the work. An excellent method when 
one is memorizing roles in a foreign language is to write out cer- 
tain parts of them, and study them while walking the street or rid- 
ing in an omnibus. This idea was suggested by an article by Cam- 
panini in a ladies' magazine. It is a good one. 

One thing that amateurs never realize and that professional 
singers know only too well, is the fact that every note of an aria 
must suggest its corresponding word, and every word mast sug- 
gest its corresponding note. For that reason, in memorizing one 
must study the words with the accompanying air, otherwise the 
combining of the two into one artistic idea can never be realized. 

San Francisco, January, 1894. William H, Keith. 



THERE are few of our business men who will not regret the 
retirement of Mr. Alfred Bannister, aftera zealous and enthu- 
siastic service of twenty years, from the Vice-Presidency of Starr 
& Co. (incorporated). He has long been a prominent figure on 
'Change, and his personal character and business capacity have 
always been highly esteemed. It is hoped that the change will 
benefit the company, but many doubt this, and fear it is the 
work of their enemies and business opponents. At any rate, if 
all our companies should change tbeir management because, in 
these times, their profits were reduced, and should try to run 
tbeir business to please their competitors, we fear all our best 
men, and companies, too, would doun disappear. Mr. Bannister 
retains an interest and remains a director of Starr & Co., whose 
new president is Mr. Henry Rogers, and vice-president, Mr. A. 
D, Starr. 



THE announcement of the sudden death of John H. Dall in his 
room at the Palace last Tuesday, has caused regret among the 
many who knew and esteemed him. In early days he was a 
steamboat captain, and at one time was associated with Bradley 
& Rulofson, the photographers. For many years hu has been a 
dealer in photographic supplies. 

The Rebagliati Spanish Quintette can be engaged for concerts, 
dinners, recitals, weddings, teas, etc., etc., by addressing J. M. Shaw- 
han, manager, 211 Sansome street, San Francisco, Cal. 

N. B. — These musicians do not play for dancing. 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 



UHirmsACii Proprietor!. I J. J. Gottlob 

Two week*. Commencing Monday, January 1Mb, 

'FRISCO'S 

FO UK. MOST 
FAVORITE, 



Manager. 



THE ENSIGN. 



Rcplele with realistic splendors. 
A large and most efficient cast. 



BALOWIN THEATRE. 



AL Hayhan A Co .. .. Lessees and Proprietor., 

, unnnn , . „ To-uitrht and all next week. 

IMPORTANT EVENT- A. M. Pa'mers Stock Company (from Palmer's 

THE DANCING GIRL, 

By Henry Arthur Jones, author of "The Silver King," Saints 
and Sinners," Etc., in which the entire Palmer company will 
appear. J 



Keeling Bbob 
To night. Third week 



TiVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 



Triumpbaat success 



Proprietor* and Managers. 



THE ISLAND OF JEWELS. 

Complete change of music. See the great Electric March, the wondrous 
transformation, California's crowning glory, "Pun-et City." Hear all 
the latest songs. Next opera, THE BLOUAK STUDENT. 

Popular Patens 25 and 50o 

THE EVENT OF THE SEASON. 

MECHANICS' PAVILION. 

PRIZE MASQUERADE BALL of the 

VEREIN EINTRACHT, 

SATURDAY January 13, 1894. 

ADMISSION, ONE DOLLAR. 

Reserved seats 50 cents extra, at Goldstein & Cohn, 822 Market Street. 
Doors open at 7. Grand Promenade Concert '30 pieces) from 8-9. Grand 
March at 9 p. m. $1000 worth of pr.zes will be distributed. 



THE GRANDEST ON EARTH. 



YOSEMITE 



SEE 



PANORAMA, 

(Corner of Tenth and Market Streets.) 
NOW OPEN. Admission 25cts 

60LDEN GATE HALL — 625 Sutter St. 

WEDNESDAY EVENING January 17, 1994. 

FIB ST CONCERT of a series of four to be given by 

NATHAN LANIiSBERGEK (violin) and SAJIDIL (J. FLEISHMAN (piano), 

Assisted by Mrs. Sedgeley-Reynolds, Contralto; Louis Heine, 'Cello: and 
B. Jaulus, viola. Under the management of Philip Hastings. 

Subscription, reserved seat, for four concerts, $3.00. Single reserved 
seat, $1 00. Seats now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co. 's mus ic store. 

I II I 1AM RPHDARn The English actress, coaches ladies and 
LILLIHIl ULUUnllU, gentlemen for the dramatic profession; ap- 
pearances arranged. SHAKESPEAREAN ACADEMY, 1007 California 
Street, opposite the Flood Mansion. 

LAUREL HILL CEMETERY. 

There are a number of unclaimed bodies of deceased persons lying 
in our receiving vault upon which dues have heen delinquent for a 
number of years. As we are about making added improvements, 
and as our space is limited, we are compelled to remove for inter- 
ment elsewhere all such bodies upon which there is a delinquency. 
CHARLES H. CROW ELL, Secretary. 

SLATE BURIAL VAULTS. 

Are recommended by every person who sees them. They are proof 
against dampness, rodents and reptiles ; are portable to ship to any par t 
of the country. Are cheaper than brick and can be put in place by ordinary 
workmen. Slate is Im- 
perishable by nature, 
and has greater strength 
than any other stone. Ap- 

§ly to R F. ROBERT 
ON, Pacific Coast Agent, 
Los Gatos, Cal. N. CLARK 
& SONS, 17 and 19 Speai 
St. , San Francisco. 

Telephone 771. 




E3IAt\mC A ' L BANCROFT & CO. 
rlnllSVw 323 Sutter St , S. F. 

Knabe, Haines, Rush & Gerts, and others, 
t-askor installm.ms. Please call or correspond, 

SAN 
FRANCISCO, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETJER. 



Jan. 13. 1894. 



J^ tooker-op. 

THE catting remarks made in ttaia paper last week by a con- 
tributor, in explanation of tbe fact that there is no salon in 
8an Francisco, seem to have touched a sore spot, if the Lookek-On 
rightly interprets the letters which the editor has received and 
laid before him. None of these was written by the rich society 
women whom the contributor's article assailed, for in their aristo- 
cratic hanteur they would not condescend to notice such an at- 
tack, being perfectly satisfied with themselves, their ways and 
their followers, arid likely ascribing the contributor's bitterness to 
a sense of personal neglect. But the letters evidently were writ- 
ten by champions of these women, and must be taken, therefore, 
as expressing the views and making the defense of the assailed 
ladies themselves. In a few words these views and this defense 
may be summed up as follows: That the men of " upper Bohemia" 
are themselves at fault; for, besides holding themselves in a 
scornful attitude, thereby disclosing an envions resentment toward 
those who possess wealth and exercise the power which it brings, 
they neglect and refuse the opportunity which any gentleman 
possesses to make himself agreeable, and thus to become a mem- 
ber of " select fashionable society; " that, as a matter of fact, few 
of these bright men possess the savoir faire which is necessary, 
having failed, by keeping away from society, to receive the polish 
which distinguishes a well-bred man; that in certain instances 
newspaper writers who have been admitted on equal terms to the 
homes of the elect have gone away laughing in their sleeves, and 
published grossly unkind, untrue and ungentlemanly things 
about their entertainers; that in any event the men of "upper 
Bohemia" are useless as members of society, in that they scorn 
its frivolities— they do not dance, they treat with open contempt 
the regular " society men " with whom they are thrown in con- 
tact, scorn " afternoon teas," and in general are sententious, over- 
bearing, self-conscious and supercilious. 
« • * 
There is a great deal of truth in all that, but it all happens to 
be far from the issue. Two vital misconceptious have arisen— 
one that the correspondents have confused the idea of a salon 
with that of fashionable society, the other that the men of " upper 
Bohemia " are all newspaper writers, or even reporters. If a re- 
porter accepts tbe hospitality of any home in bis capacity as gen- 
tleman, and then publishes what he has seen and heard, he is not 
a gentleman, and, therefore, not a member of " upper Bohemia." 
Again, the men of >' upper Bohemia " are not only some of those 
who write, but also those who are engaged in any other artistic 
pursuit, such as painting, music and the like. Men in business 
and the professions, and the larger number of newspaper writers, 
are excluded from this category, because their occupations cannot 
be classed as having a relation to art, and do not develop those 
peculiar tastes which a study of the various intellectual arts in- 
culcates. Literature (which is a very different thing from ordi- 
nary newspaper writing) is an art, and litterateurs have the tastes 
which the pursuit of art implants. Manifestations of taste on the 
part of all who have made a place for themselves in any of the 
walks of art are seen, roughly speaking, in refinement, gentleness 
and a modified modesty, in love of wholesome pleasure, in cheer- 
fulness, shrewdness, tact, wit and knowledge of books and men; 
in intolerance of toadyism, flunkeyism, meaningless small talk 
and vapidities in general; in generosity and unconventional 
charity ; in contempt for Pharisaism, pretense, shams and a vulgar 
display of wealth. 

That the rich society women of San Francisco do not seem to 
know that this delightful class of men exists is deplorable. Ward 
McAllister admits ruefully that the men best qualified to shine 
in society are those who most sedulously avoid it. But this is 
right. The women of fashionable society are generally charming, 
but no man of character and true culture cares to be thrown in 
contact with the men who make the pursuit of society a business. 

The idea of a salon is wholly different. It is a bringing together 
of bright, fine and sparkling spirits, and not of toadies and dancing 
idiots, who " dote " on parties and afternoon teas. Money, how- 
ever, is required to conduct a salon, for it is somewhat an expen- 
sive luxury. The women best qualified by fine taste and tact to 
conduct a salon are generally lacking in means; those who have 
sufficient wealth are blinded to the finer world which lies within 
their reach (and which could be enjoyed independently of their 
fashionable lives) by the cloud of toadies who surround them and 
who cripple them with flattery and flunkeyism. Mrs. Austin 
(" Betsy B."), a beautiful and always charming woman, had the 
only salon that " upper Bohemia " has ever enjoyed in San Fran- 
cisco, and her death put an end to it. Mrs. Gertrude Atherton, 
beantiful, brilliant and tactful, had her house nearly always filled 
with brilliant men and women when she was here last, and she 
could have maintained an ideal salon had she remained, in spite 



of the fact that she is not rich and is a wonderful worker. Mrs. 
John Vance Cheney is richly blessed with all the charms which 
make a woman winsome, and, if she had time and means, could 
have a brilliant salon. The ideal woman for this undertaking, 
with regard to all desirable qualifications — natural and acquired 
graces, great wealth and a large and beautiful home — is Mrs. 
William H. Crocker; she has beauty, wit and vivacity, and an 
independent spirit wbicb must chafe at times under the dull con- 
ventionalities with which the life of her choice necessarily en- 
virons her. A salon conducted by her need not mean one for 
" upper Bohemia " alone; she would have the tact and versatility 
to enlarge it to the proportions of Madame Adam's, which in- 
cluded all the men of Paris to whom the force of intellect had 
brought eminence. 

Now that the Midwinter Fair is an assured success, the politics 
of the Exposition and its development as a factor in the next 
campaign, is responsible for no little wire-pulling in an about the 
headquarters. There is much unconscious humor in some of the 
combinations, and an incident a few days ago revealed an ambi- 
tion which was not at first taken seriously by those to whom 
it was mentioned. Several members of the Executive Committee 
of the Exposition were discussing its outlook with one or two 
other olBcials. The conversation turned to the work done by the 
Director-General and his subsequent political reward for his exer- 
tions. 

"Well," said Colonel Andrews, "I'm a Democrat and De Young 
is a Republican, but I am standing in. But there's one thing 
about it— if I support him for Senator he ought to support me for 
Governor!" 

Politics was abruptly dropped, and the group was broken up 
by the scattering of the party in the most convenient directions. 

* * * 

The Lookek-Ok was walking with a ladv on Montgomery street 
one day this week, when she stopped suddenly and pointed out 
a tall, stylishly dressed girl who stood looking in a jeweler's 
window. 

"Oh, there is Miss , whom we came overland with," she 

said delightedly. "I really must go and speak to her. She was 
the life of our party. We occupied adjoining sections, you 
know." Then she rushed effusively to grtet her compagnon de 
voyage, and was about to kiss her then and there, when the other 
drew back. 

"Is it possible you don't remember me, dear Miss ?" said 

my friend. "And are you tired after our journey? You are 
looking real well, don't you know." 

The bright, handsome face of the girl grew sad, as she said in a 
low voice to my warm-hearted little friend: "You must not be 
seen speaking to me, dear. I am not a good woman." As the 
other drew back, pale and shocked, I had some idea of the 
wrench it gave the poor femme de ville to make that confession. 

* * * 

The first one to bring the news to Dr. Coggswell that his statue 
had been overthrown, and that the present generation had boldly 
stepped in to protect posterity, was a news boy- Tbe great man 
would not believe it at first, and hurried down to Market and 
Pine streets to behold the wreck. He almost wept as he bent 
over his pot-metal presentment as it lay, "fallen, fallen, fallen 
from its high estate," and weltering in the mnd. To this moment 
he refuses to be convinced that a posse of artists laid him low. 
He was talking about it thia week at the Woman's Exchange, 
where be buys his goodies. 

"AmadSe Joullin," said the doctor, "without any solicitation 
from me, has praised that statue as a work of art. I do not 
think it too much that when a man makes a corporation a valu- 
able present, his statue should be permitted to be a part of the 
work. I don't care what they have done in Boston. They are 
a lot of ungrateful bean-eaters, anyhow." 

Some of Coggswell's intimate friends are afraid that the com- 
plication of mortifying insults will drive tbe old man to drink. 

* * » 

" I think," remarked a pretty girl to the Looker On the other 
day, " that this plan of a poor young girl marrying a rich old 
man is excellent. You see," she continued, her brown eye 
sparkling mischievously and her blue eye looking limpid and in- 
nocent, " the old man dies first, leaving bis money to his wife. 
By this time she has lost her youth, but is a well-groomed, well- 
fed, attractive and rich widow, and is sought in marriage by im- 
pecuneous young men. She marries one of them, of course, and 
he is much younger than she, and thus, by two marriages, she 
secures the two desirable desiderati — wealth in one case and the 
ardent attentions of a young man in the other. So her life is 
rounded and completed. Being older than her husband, she dies 
first, leaving him exactly in the position in which she had been 
left by the death of her first husband. Upon her death the second 
husband finds himself In the position of the first— a middle-aged 
or elderly rich man. Naturally, having been denied the compan- 



Db. Hammond recommends, as a certain cure for chronic indigestion 
and dyspepsia, chewing Adams' Pepsin Chewing Gum after each meal for 
half an hour. 



Jan. 18, 1&93. 



SAN HM\< [» NEWS LETTEK 



lonablp of a younp wife. be. 1ik< lb« Ar»l butbind. marries a poor 
youDR cirl. and thus bis life, loo i rounded and completed. He 
diea firtt. Iravinc bl« ymng wife n ricb and attractive widow, who 
fn turn roarrie* a poor man yon n gar iban herself. She dli 
leaving bini an elderly ricb man who yearns for the society Ol a 
young wife, and then dies first, find bis widow marries a poor 
young man, and upon her death he marries a poor yonng girl, and 
— and — thus it goes to the end ■■' lima. Don't you see that a sin- 
gle fortune, by tbus banding it down and down, can be made to 
complete an infinite number of lives?" 

And now the LooKCB-0 n a ricb elderly man) is wonder- 

ing whether it would be wise t-< break oil his engagement to 
marry that girl, who is young, poor and amazingly pretty, but 
astonishingly wise as well. Cannot the readers of this paper ad- 
vise him in tbe matter? 

We learn from a friend of ours, who is a member of tbe Young 
Men's Christian Association, that lie and that body is very much 
grieved at our hostility to the tramps. If our course causes him 
pain be bad better resign from the association, get a saw-horse 
and saw, and begin life anew. It is a significant fact that we 
have never received a protest from a wood-sawyer. Besides, our 
great-grandfather was a wood sawyer (one of the very best in 
the country), and not a Christian Associationer; and there is such 
a thing as family pride. 



A VIEW OF EVANS* CASE. 



EDITOR News Lettee— Dear Sir: While I do not wish to take 
issue with you in the matter of the article entitled "A Mawk- 
ish Sentiment," which appeared in the last number of the News 
Letter, yet I think you are misjudging the "popular sentiment" 
by saying that •• this sympathy is merely the admiration of man, 
tbe animal, for brute force, pluck and courage." It is not at 
all astonishing to my mind that " men of intelligence and good 
living" express a desire that Evans may escape. It is the reflex 
of a sentiment that is gathering force; a sentiment which con- 
demns the venality of those laws which hound to death the ban- 
dit Evans and condone the offences of the "prominent citizen." 

An era of corruption in high places has set in, and unless speed- 
ily checked, it will result in direful consequences. No specious 
reasoning will avert it, the fallacies of which are easily proved. 
The sovereignty of the people is being crushed, their will violated 
and the traditions of our country stultified. 

This "popular sentiment" of which you speak, has a deeper 
signification than the mere superficial observer imagines. It is 
the manner in which the people are beginning to manifest their 
resentment. Better not arouse the sleeping lion, for he will strike 
and crush with terrible power and vengeance. Although I do 
not wish to be understood as entering a plea for Evans, still I 
think he compares quite favorably with others who are not yet 
under the ban of the law, but through no fault of their own. 

"Which is the more despicable creature of the two— the bandit, 
Evans, who robbed a train, braving death in the elements, and 
defying the "sleuth-hounds of the law" high up in the moun- 
tain's icy fastness, or the prosperous and talented lawyer, who 
not only violates the ethics of his profession, but grossly betrays 
his client's trust, robs him of his all, and goes unpunished; the 
bandit, Evans, who robbed a train, or the sleek and well-groomed 
banker who robs the poor man of his life savings to turn them 
into his own glutted coffers, and. through the chicanery of the 
law, goes scot free; the bandit, Evans, or the smug-faced school 
director who betrays the people, barters his honor, practices 
extortion, and, when the Grand Jury is darkly hinted at, laughs in 
his sleeve; the bandit, Evans, or the merchant who, through 
fraudulent bankruptcy, defrauds his creditors and dupes his 
friends; the bandit, Evans, or the Bbylock who fattens upon 
usury and threatens his victims with "the law," if they do not 
"come to time;" the bandit, Evans, or the purse-proud "leading 
citiaen," who takes with his left hand, with ten-fold interest, 
what his right has ostentatiously given away; the bandit, Evans, 
or the rum-besotted politicians who loot the public treasury and 
lay their unclean hands upon everything in sight? 

If the laws themselves admit of corrupt practices, they should 
be amended ; but if the corrupt practices are directly the fault of 
their administration, some means should be immediately devised 
to check it. We deprecate laws which permit crime to go un- 
punished, of whatever nature, but a system of laws which per- 
mits of such jugglery and chicanery as is practiced in the courts 
of this city every day, is a farce. Yours respectfully, 

San Framctsco, January 10, 1894. 0. M. Pratt. 



MR. F. B. Lund, general representative in the United States for 
Hiram Walker & Sons (Limited), distillers and bottlers in 
bond, of WalkerviLle, Canada, and proprietors of the famous 
"Canadian Club" whisky, is in town, looking after the fine ex- 
hibit which his firm is to make in the Midwinter Fair, extensive 
space in the Agricultural Building having been secured for that 
purpose. 




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For sale by all first-class "Wine Merchants and Grocers. 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast, 

I2S California Street. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 13, 1894. 




THE feminine part of the social world is making the most of 
these lovely afternoons and paying calls in an energetic man- 
ner. Pretty girls in stylish costumes flit in and out of the doors 
of the big houses, and handsome carriages line up the curb as if 
some important function were going on. The excitement culmin- 
ates as the hour for tea arrives, and four o'clock usually finds a 
dozen girls around some special table. Just now the chatter is 
fast and furious, and the all-absorbing topic, the breaking of the 
Hager-Dean engagement. It has all happened since the new 
year came in, and the rosy visions which, presumably, accom- 
pany such situations, have dissolved in smoke. The difference 
in creeds is said to be the stumbling block in the path of the young 
couple, neither being willing to adopt the religion of the other. It 
is certainly a pity that the question cannot be satisfactorily 
settled, for that the engagement was thoroughly a love affair is 
beyond a doubt. What time will do no one knows, but at pres- 
ent the break is absolute and final. 

* # * 

From this the talk naturally goes to the other engagement in 
the family. Every one is commenting on Madame's attitude in 
absolutely denyiDg the existence of any such affair. It is cer- 
tainly not a pleasant position for her son's fiancee, who is charm- 
ing in every way, and as they say, •■ much too good for him." 
Perhaps mamma thinks one engagement at a time is sufficient, or 
she may object to the young people having settled things with- 
out her assistance, for every one knows that she likes to have a 
finger in every pie. Be it as it may, when the customary con- 
gratulations are offered on "your son's engagement," she court- 
eously but firmly declines them, and says she knows of no reason 
for their presentation. 

-* * * 

Miss Julia Crocker and her kind, hospitable mother, seem 
to be untiring in their efforts to provide entertainments 
for their numerous friends. The frolic on New Year's night was 
a novelty and thoroughly entered into by the guests, each one 
of whom had to cook a certain dish, whether stewed oysters, 
Welsh rarebit, or a fry. Chafing dishes and all tbe paraphernalia 
were provided. As may be imagined, great merriment resulted, 
and in many instances an appetizing dish, making the fair cooks 
appear doubly attractive to several of the partakers thereof, 

* * # 

It is singular how differently the same idea is viewed by peo- 
ple. Now, most of those who were cognizant of this pleasant 
affair, were loud in praise of the conception and the clever way 
in which it was carried out. But several thought otherwise. One 
old matron remarked with dudgeon: " If folks liked to keep up 
cookin' all their days, they were welcome to it; for my part I've 
done with such things, and my childer don't need to know noth- 
ing about that kind of doings." 

* * * 

It looks very much as though a wedding in the Crocker circle 
may be a feature of the Easter season. What a charming bride 
pretty Miss Beth Sperry would make! Joe Tobin is said to be 
the happy man, and society is saying bow very nice the match 
would be; such a popular young couple, etc. 

* * * 

Why is it that any organization purely feminine is bound, 
sooner or later, to squabble and end in most admired disorder? 
The Town and Country Club ha3 been at it "hammer and tongs" 
for quite a while, to use the phrase of one of its leading members, 
and now one hears of discord in the Progressive Euchre Club. 
Getting "commish," on buying prizes, doesn't always pay in the 
long run. 

* * # 

On dit, a party of young ladies well known in leading social cir- 
cles, has decided to follow tbe example of the Century Club, and 
invite a Salvation Army worker to tell them all the experiences 
of a tour of the city's most wickeo>places. 

* * # 

Already many of our pretty girls are planning a crusade during 
Lent, and no doubt if earnestly undertaken the work will be well 
carried out. 

Now that Mr. Wilberforce's success as a "tea" giver has es- 
tablished the fact that that form of entertainment does not belong 
exclusively to tbe ladies, society will be on the qui vive for others 
of a like nature for its delectation. 

* * » 

The announcement of Mr. Callingham Byrne's intention to 
give a house-warming at Burlingame, has filled his young lady 
friends with pleasureable anticipation. Every one who has 
ever attended a suburban entertainment, where wealth can be 
made a factor, knows how many delightful things can be grouped 
together to enhance tbe pleasure of the occasion. 



Of course, there ^ill be numberless "house-parties" for the 
event, and asttbe Sbarons, Haggins and Parrotts have villas about 
the tract, it goes without saying that the attendance will be select 
as well as fashionable, comprising, indeed, the very creme de la 
creme of the swim. 

* * * 

Since the publication of Prince Poniatowski's capture by a Cali- 
fornia girl, it is said that the East has lost its charm for tbe Chi- 
cago heiress, who has so frequently been credited by the press as 
having attained that position, and hence a trip to the Pacific 
Coast was decided upon by Mrs. and Miss Pullman. 

Lent comes extra early this year, but then, par consequence, so 
does Easter, and If one may believe all that is predicted, the 
Easter season will be one of unusual brilliancy. Two large wed- 
dings are already spoken of as sure things. 

* * # 

It is too bad that the native beaux have let a fair California 
maiden be wooed and won by an Easterner. Society in general 
will regret tbe loss of charming Miss Edith Cohen, but our com- 
pensation is, we still have pretty Miss Ethel, this year's bud, 
left with us for some lucky chap to fascinate. 

* * # 

Jovial Lieutenant Wilcox seems to be making rapid strides in 
the favor of several pretty girls. One on Sutter street has been 
heard to declare that any man who knows how to season a dish 
so well would surely make a No. I husband. 

* * * 

The belles are to have a genuine treat, and from the little which 
has become known on the subject, something of a surprise as 
well, The lovely young wife of the latest addition to the wealthy 
house owners, has tbe opening of her beautiful home to her 
friends in view, and it is said by those who are supposed to know 
that she is determined to eclipse all former efforts at giving pri- 
vate balls in San Francisco's history. The cotillion is to have 
favors imported for the occasion, and her young sister will be the 
guest of honor at the brilliant affair. 

* * * 

The local daily press has discovered a new relative of the late 
W. C. Ralston, or can it be that the Lizzie Ralston described by 
it, as tbe deceased banker's niece, is in reality his widow? Mrs. 
Ralston and her youngest daughter, Bertha, have been spending 
the last two months in New York city, and will probably remain 
there all winter, as Miss Ralston is a student at one of the art 
schools of New York. 

» * * 

Pretty Miss Collier is having her mother's success in her sea- 
son's gaieties, and the attentions of the family friends at all her 
dances. Sweet Miss May Hoffman is not seen as frequently as 
her many admirers would like. 

* * * 

There is a rumor being heard in social circles that a navy offi- 
cer is tbe last victim to Cupid's wiles. 

Quite a fad East is to chew for half an hour after dinner Adams' 
Tutti Frutti Pepsin Chewing Gum for indigestion. 

Just at this season of the year every one wants a fine mince pie 
made in the good old New England style. Such a pie can be found 
at the Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street. Bon-bons, ice- 
cream, Roman punch and dainties for parties served on the shortest 
notice. Meals at all hours. This bakery has enjoyed the patronage- 
of San Francisco's best people for years, for it is first-class in all its 
affairs. 



^OFKEA^ 




DUFF GORDON SHERRY, 

THE MOST CELEBRATED AND BEST KNOWN BRAND IN 

THE WORLD. 

Sold by the Leading Wine Merchants and Grocers. 

Charles Meinecke & Co., 

Sole Agents Pacific Coast. 314 Sacramento St., S. F. 



Jan. 13, 



s.vn FRAN BOO NEWS r.rri i 






GOTHAM QOeSIP. 

New You, Jan. I. 1804, 

OH. lor a lodge in some ('»; : rnlan paradise, where ramora o( 
'umption and ol grip wnre unknown. You can not hear 
a play (or toe coughing all over the house, an. I every other man 
you meet whispers to y ntlktlj because he can n" 

to you in any other way. In truth, It la vile, moist, demnltlon 
weather, and every one with - ;;!lcient sense or wealth should My 
from it tor the next three months. 

Two Californians. who arc i. iter known among yon for their 
similarity ot tastes than (or their mutual alleclion— Tom Williams 
and Porter Ashe, are pasting Ibe winter near Jacksonville. Florida, 
less (or (beir health than (or the sake o( being near the right 
when it conies on between Corbet! and Mitchell, and chiefly, no 
doubt, to boom Ccrbett. No San Franciscan doubts the success o( 
the actor-pugilist, and it would be a sad blow alter last year's 
triumph il be were to (ail this winter. 

While the men o( all classes are thinking o( tbis fight, women 
are wondering how much amusement they can crowd in between 
now and the early Easter we are to have this year. The charity ball 
last night was the most brilliant one that has been given for years 
since, in fact, they began to pall some five or six years ago. So- 
ciety has taken it up again, however, aud appeared in great force 
last night. Among the Californian colonists there were Mrs. 
Whitelaw Reid and her father. Mr D. 0. Mills, the Townsends. 
Miss Scoeffy and her brother, the Misses Gashwiler and Mr. and 
Mrs. \V. 13. Brown. 

Mrs. Charles Alexander was hostess at a tea the day before 
yesterday, and Mrs. Oelrich's and Miss Fair's succession of leas 
has still two more afternoons. 

The Hunt ball in Washington the other night was one of the 
prettiest dances that this winter has seen. Mrs. Richardson 
Clover, formerly Miss Dora Miller, a daughter of the late Senator 
John C. Miller, received for the Hunt Club. The men all wore 
their " pink " coats, and the supper table had a huge floral saddle 
in the center, while the cotillion favors were miniature hunting 
crops, stirrup bits and whips. Mrs. Clover is one of the most 
popuiar young matrons in Washington society. 

Mrs. Condit-Smith, nee Swearingen, is giving a series of recep- 
tions for her secoDd stepdaughter, who is a " bud " this winter. 
By the way, Miss Rose Budd, daughter of Wayman Budd (who 
until his departure from San Francisco was the most popular 
broker in the street), has been visiting in New York for several 
weeks, and spent a fortnight with the Lawtons at New Rocbelle. 
Frank Lawton was long the secretary of the Board of Brokers. I 
saw him a few days ago, and can say that he is not at all changed 
in appearance, nor, from what I hear, in characteristics. His 
house at New Rochelle is one of the historic places of that pretty 
village, and has come to him through his wife's family, her an- 
cestors having been amongst the Huguenot colonists who settled 
at New Rochelle when life had become too hard for them in 
France. Lawton is, however, tired of the rigorous New York 
climate, and talks enthusiastically of the South, which he calls 
the coming country. He proposes going to North or South Caro- 
lina to "look about." 

The South is evidently not the coming country for theatricals, 
for that very charming little actress, Fay Templeton, who was 
so recently with you, is now " marching through Georgia," as 
the slang and the song both go, and they say that the walking is 
bad. 

De Wolf Hopper and his wife are again in New York. Little 
Edna Wallace is making a great success of her new vocation, and 
her singing does credit to her teacher, Mrs. 
Nichols. 

I fancy that there are several people in 
San Francisco who have heard with regret 
of the death of that charming writer and 
brave and adventurous explorer, Sir Sam- 
uel Baker, which occurred so suddenly 
last Saturday. On his journey around the 
world seven or eight years ago he spent 
three months in your city, where he made 
many warm friends, as did also his charm- 
ing wife. His body will be cremated 
to-day at Woking Cemetery. 

It is a sudden transition from death to 
marriage, but I must speak of the engage- 
ment, just announced, of Frederick Geb- 
hardt and Miss Louise Morris, the acknowl- 
edged beauty of Baltimore. There are 
many who doubt whether it will ever be 
consummated, as it is not the first time 
that Miss Morris has been fiancee, and she 
is said to have a pretty vein of coquetry. 
The weighty Gebhardt has long been Miss 
Morris' slave, and there were many people 
who expected this announcement sooner. 

Senator Stephen M. White of California 
has registered this week at the Holland 




11 



Guess How 
Many 

s of Pearl- 
ine have been con- 
sumed. I [undreds of 
millions! Successful 
from iht: very start, it is 
more successful now than 
c\ er. Every year the sales 
are piling up and increasing, though 
every month brings sonic new would-be imita- 
tion. Why is it? If you're one of the millions 
of women who are using Pearline, you won't 
have to ask why. This is the reason: It is the 
best thing of its kind. And that is what most 
women want, for their washing and cleaning. 

ALWAYS refuse imitations. 373 JAMES PYLE, New York 

PACIFIC MINING AGENCY 
AND TRUST COMPANY. 

Irwin C. Stump, President. Wm. C. Ralston, Secretary.,. The Anglo- 

Californian Bauk, Ld., Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS— Irwin C. Stump, Irving M. Scott, Jacob H. Neflf, W. P. 
Goad, R. C. Chambers, P. N. Lilieuthal, D. M. Burns. 

MILLS BUILDING, San Francisco. 

This company has been formed to sell mining and ditch properties and 
water rights on commission only. It is prepared to act as agent and broker 
for the sale and purchase of such properties. Mines listed at its offices 
will be brought to the attention of investors; no bond is required until 
there is a prospective purchaser. 

1 he company will look after the interests of nonresidents or obtain in- 
formation for them; it will also assist mining engineers, superintendents, 
foremen, assayers, millmen and miners to obtain employment. 

The Company is prohibited by its articles of incorporation from buying 
or selling mines on its own account, and except as agent or factor for 
others. 

ZISKA INSTITUTE, 

1604-1606 VAN NESS ATENTE, San Francisco. 

French, German and English day and boarding school for young ladies 
and children. Next term begins August 3, 1893. For prospectus, address 

MME.B. ZISKA. A. M„ Principal. 

House, and M. L. Mortimer at the Murray Hill. 

News comes from Washington of the retirement of Captain 
Pessenden of the Fifth Cavalry, owing lo ill health. Captain 
Fessenden is now stationed at San Francisco. Commander Whit- 
ing and his pretty bride, who was Miss Etta Afong of Hono- 
lulu, are now visiting in Kansas City. Mrs. Whiting has already 
made many friends amongst her husband's relatives. She has won 
everybody with her music, for she brought a taro-patch fiddle with 
her, and her playing was the delight of every one on the train. 

Passe Paetout. 



IT IS ALL THE TALK 

The question of the purity of food and 
the milk wedrink. For more than Thirty 
years the 

GAIL BORDEN "mil" BRAND 

has held first place in the estimation of 
the American People so far as Condensed 
Milk is concerned. Why? Because no 
person who buys it is ever disappointed 
in its uniformity of quality, and superior 
richness. Every can is sterilized and is 
Free from Disease Germs. 

Your Grocer & Druggist sell it. 

It's economy to buy the "Eagle" brand as it goes farthest. 




12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 13, 1894. 




ft Firm While speculation on Pine street has not been 

Miriing particularly brisk during the week, the tone of the 
Market, Conistock market has been remarkably firm. The 
greatest confidence prevails among the leading mining men of 
Virginia City in the future outcome of the work now being done 
on the 1000-level of Con. Cal. -Virginia. The misstatements of 
fact which emanate from interested sources in this city have done 
much to mislead speculators, but their effect is gradually wearing 
off as people begin to realize the little weight they carry with the 
better class of operators, who take the stock when it comes in 
from timid holders. The Rule drift has cut recently some low 
grade ore, which in itself is considered a hopeful sign, and no 
time is being lost in running it toward the objective point, where 
it is hoped a higher grade of quarlz will be encountered. At the 
south end of the lode work has been commenced again in Alta, 
and the new management is determined that the shareholders 
will benefit from it, which is more than they have done in the 
past. In a few days the Justice people will begin milling ore 
from the rich west ground recently acquired after a long and ex- 
pensive law suit, and the prospects are that assessments will be 
light in the future, if the ore pans out as well as it is expected it 
will in gold. The Ophir Company has also started in to explore 
a west ledge, which is believed to be very rich in gold. A great 
deal of money was taken out from the same locality in the past, 
and little or no development work has ever been done there. The 
middle stocks are low considering the merit of the mines, and 
conservative buyers have been picking up Savage and Chollar 
for some days past. Yellow Jacket is now producing some 
money, which will help to reduce operating expenses, and those 
who are in a position to know, speak very highly of the pros- 
pects in the mine on the 1100-level. The only assessments levied 
during the week were on Scorpion and East Sierra Nevada. The 
Jackson mine of Eureka district paid a 10-cent dividend and out- 
side stocks are quiet and dull. 

$ $ $ 

The Fair It would be a wise move upon the part of the Mid- 
ftfiniqg winter Fair managers to let the direction of affairs of 

Exhibit the mining exhibit rest entirely with our own people. 
There has been more or less interference on the part of outsiders, 
and a disposition has been shown to snub any one who does not 
belong to the clique, if any suggestions are offered. The gentle- 
men imported from the East will find quite enough to do in 
attending to departments with which they are more familiar, and 
any interference with the mining part of the show is altogether 
out of place. Not enough attention has been devoted by the 
Directors to mining, which should be the leading feature of the 
.Fair, and overlooking this fact is a shortsided policy which can- 
not be too strongly criticised 

$ $ 5 

THERE is some talk in London about reconstructing the San 
Jacinto estates (Limited), as the only alternative to a complete 
loss of the property, which would have to be sold at a forced sale 
to meet the demands of debenture holders. It is sheer nonsense 
to talk about putting more money into this scheme, which proved 
such a rank failure. The wisest way would be to cut the pecun- 
iary loss short where it stands to-day, and not go throwing good 
money after bad. Past experience proves clearly that there is 
no profit to be gained in working these lodes for tin. The mineral 
is not there in sufficient quantities to pay, unless the many com- 
petent experts who examined the mine are at fault, which is not 
likely. 

¥ $ $ 

THE Directors of the Golden Feather Company in London esti- 
mate the cost from now until the date of getting returns in 
1894 at $16,000. Of this the Directors have on hand $9000, and 
they expect to be able to provide the necessary balance without 
having to appeal to the shareholders. .The statement of account 
shows that the amount expended during the year on mining ao- 
count was $30,945, less bullion and lumber sold, $9200, leaving 
a net expenditure of $21,570. The expenses in London were $6235. 

% % % 

THE Sapphire and Ruby Company of London has failed, a fact 
which some of the financial authorities pretend to deplore. 
The blame is laid upon the underwriters of the company, who re- 
pudiated £370,000 of the company's shares. The property, it is 
said, is a rich one, and its products should have sufficed to pay 
excellent, dividends, upon a far larger amount than the present 
capitalization. 

$ $ $ 

YANKEE energy is unabated with the flight of time. The Mu- 
tual Life of New York, and the Equitable Life of the United 
States, have opened offices for business in the South African Re- 
public. 



rfnnual # De election of Directors for the ensuing year at 

Baqfi the People's Bank, which took place during the 

Elections, week, passed off very satisfactorily, and men were 
selected in whom the stockholders can have the fullest confi- 
dence. Out of the 10,000 shares of capital stock, 7000 were rep- 
resented at the meeting, and the action on all questions was 
unanimous. The new directorate is as follows: Julius Bousbey, 
President; D. 8. Dorn, M. H. Westpha 1 , William Jenningson, R. 
H. McDonald, Jr., Emil Bellerman and G. P. Keeney. Dorn & 
Dorn will continue as attorneys for the bank, and Frank H. Stone 
will act as special counsel. When Mr. Boushey, who represents 
heavy Eastern and outside stockholders, consented to accept the 
presidency of the Board, it was with the understanding that the 
majority of the old Board of Directors would remain with him 
until he has had time to master the business of the bank. Under 
his supervision the work of reorganization will proceed rapidly, 
and it is said that some wealthy capitalists of this city are calcu- 
lated upon to take an active interest in its affairs. 

$ $ $ 

THE annual meeting of the First National Bank was held dur- 
ing the week, and the following Board of Directors was 
elected : I*. G. Murphy, James Moffitt, George A. Low, J. Downey 
Harvey, Thomas Jennings, N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, 
J. A. Hooper aud George C. Perkins. S. G. Murpby was re-elected 
president, James Moffit vice-president, E. D. Morgan cashier 
and James K. Lynch assistant cashier. The net earnings of 
the bank were reported at 16 per cent, on the capital stock, and 
a dividend of 10 per cent, was declared. 

$ $ $ 

THE annual monthly disbursements are being made by local 
corporations. The following dividends are payable on the 
15th: Oakland Gas, 20c; Atlantic Dynamite, 40c; San Fran- 
cisco Gas, 35c; Bank of California, $3 75; Edison Light and 
Power Company, 66jc. per share. 
$ $ $ 

THE California Safe Deposit and Trust Company has elected the 
following directors: J. D. Fry, John W. Coleman, Jacob C. 
Johnson, A. D. Sharon, R. B. Wallace, R. D. Fry, I. G. Wicker- 
sham, J. Dalzell Brown, James Treadwell, J. M. Shotwell and 
Henry Williams. 

$ $ $ 

AT the annual election of the Crocker-Woolwortti Bank, which 
has just been held, the following officers were elected for the 
ensuing year: W.H.Crocker, president; G. W. Kline, cashier; 
and Charles F. Crocker, E. B. Pond and W. E. Brown, directors. 

$ $ $ 
Very few The New Year has opened quietly in insurance 
Insurance circles, and the number of changes announced have 
Changes, been few in comparison with the number which 
were predicted to take place. Outside of the absorption of the 
New York Underwriters by the Hartford, the only notification of 
a change reported during the week was that in the Bromwell, 
Fowler agency. L. L. Bromwell retires to take management of 
the Oakland Home. Varney W. Gaskill will in the future attend 
to the city business of Bromwell'sold companies in this city, and 
the marine business will remain in the hands of Mr. Fowler. 
Nothing has so far been heard from any of the British companies, 
and it is to be presumed that things will remain as they are in so 
far as the different managements are concerned, now that the 
business year has fully commenced. Business is reported quiet 
with most of the leading companies, with collections generally 
slow. No exciting topic is disturbing tbe peace of the P. I. U., 
for a wonder, and tbe warriors on both sides of the house are rest- 
ing on their arms for the time being. 

$ $ $ 
Sfjould John B. Daly, who was for so many years con- 

Make nected with the business department of the Mom- 
Mis Mark, ing Call, and more recently with a prominent real 
estate firm, has now entered tbe insurance business on his own 
account. He has been appointed City Agent of the Royal Ex- 
change Assurance of London, a company with assets amounting 
to $21,000,000, and a record of $175,000,000 in losses paid. Mr. 
Daly has a large business acquaintance, and as bis popularity is 
only equaled by his ability, he should make a brilliant success in 
his new departure. 

$ $ $ 

THE retirement of Mr. Eugene Kelly, the New York banker, at 
the age of eighty years, has again given rise to the rumor that 
tbe firm which includes Joseph J. Donahue, of this city, and the 
younger members of both families, will soon discontinue all for- 
eign relations, and close up the branch offices, devoting itself en- 
tirely to the management of its own private property. Mr. Dona- 
hue has been connected with the firm for over forty-three years. 

s s s 

THE Institute of Actuaries in London, and the Faculty of Actu- 
aries in Scotland, are taking steps to modernize the mortality 
tables which have done duty for so many years in life insurance. 




s\\ 1 l:\\< is, o NEWS LEI 1 1 R 



i; 



" Hear the Crier' " " ^ «,: the derll art thou? 
"One ih« will pIit the i vll. dr. with you." 



THE Syrian baa come like a wolf on the fold 
(Likewise the Armenian to hunt for our gold, 
And the voice of the fa^;r is lond on the street. 
And bis costume is greasy, bis aura not sweet. 

And the daughters of Egypt, they carve and they coil; 
They're not too delightful, their complexions won't spoil; 
But they dance and they wriggle, eat garlic, and dirt. 
And their life is a poem in homage of dirt. 

We think of the harem and truly believe 
The layout is bouest. not meant to deceive. 
And we dream of the Bpbynx and all the romance 
Of the East when we witness the sensuous dance. 

There's naught in those dances our morals to hurt. 
80 strong the suggestion of dirt, and more dirt; 
For no matter how strong be in Haidee our faith, 
Alas! we are conscious she yet scorns the bath. 

ST. MARYS CHURCH ought to have a new clock. In other 
words, that old, unreliable, hypocritical four-faced clock which 
has for years deceived this community is about defunct. For 
months one band used to stand still while the other went around 
like a wind-mill. This clock very often has no hesitancy in an- 
nouncing that it is 3 p. m, when you are trying to catch the 10 
a. m. boat. The Archbishop has excommunicated it several times 
and wound it up with a red-hot key by way of discipline, but its 
sorrow was only dial deep and never penetrated its interior. Its 
habits of irregularity have become so disgraceful that it is a won- 
der that any ecclesiastical establishment can stand them. It gives 
constant evidence of horological inebriety, and at times its hands 
refuse to stand upright. It may be that it has become accustomed 
to the habits of the people who live in its vicinity, but, neverthe- 
less, we suggest that it be removed and a maledictits chanted 
over its remains. 

WE notice with distress and alarm a growing disposition on the 
part of the young blood of the day, when he feels particu- 
larly wealthy and jubilant over his duck and burgundy, to abuse 
the head waiter and call him a low-lived villain. This is supposed 
to be distinctively English, but it is not. It belongs only to the 
British cad, and he is a poor model for the American youth to 
follow. Waiters have rights, and when those rights are infringed 
upon they have a peculiar and disagreeable way of gratifying 
their revenge. The little time which intervenes between the re- 
ceiving of the dish from the cook and its placing before the guest, 
Is devoted to retribution, and that is of such a disagreeable char- 
acter that we forbear from mentioning it, except to say that the 
dish has received something which neither the cook designed nor 
the gnest expected. 

AMISS WHITE, Somethingorotheress of the San Jose Pratt 
Home for Making Children Miserable by Keeping Them 
Clean, has been overhauled for punishing her little charges with 
boards, clubs and the like, in such a way as to leave black and 
blue marks on their peripheries. A breaker of youthful spirits 
who does not know bow to be cruel without leaving blue patches 
of skin to babble of clubs, fists and pokers, and wbo is ignorant 
of the superior efficacy of a dark cell, castor oil, red pepper, pins 
and other methods of blind torture, seems to lack the executive 
ability required for the bringing up of children who, having lost 
their parents, must subsist on cat-'o-nine-tailed charity. 

IT is absolutely criminal on the part of the dailies to endeavor 
once more to boom the stock of that notorious adventuress, 
Vera Hastings, alias Countess d'Henriot. This woman is the oc- 
topus of that class of vealy youth which comes under the gen- 
eral designation of JBillie boy, and as such, she should be placarded 
"dangerous" by all the monitors of youth. Poor little John Brad- 
bury, of Los Angeles, yielded her all his ready cash, and the big- 
gest part of his credit. Now she is on the road again, and with- 
out the shadow of a doubt her net will snare some soft roe-her- 
ring before the month is over. 

SINCE the Poole tragedy the stock of the Tivoli chorus girl has 
gone up at least a hundred per cent. Those young ladies 
bear themselves now with a dignity and haughtiness foreign to 
their former demeanor. Gazing stonily over the admiring audi- 
ence, they seem to say, » Be very careful, please, how you trifle 
with our affections. Only a few days ago a young man was killed 
about ua." 

"Ol WHY do the swallows glide on their wings ? " is the title 
\J ! of a poem sent by a young man to us for criticism. We 
suppose they must do it or walk. 

WE trust that the tax on playing cards will not necessarily 
raise the limit. 



"A 1 



BITTERLY and .axagely. and with • feeling akin to a hippo. 
polamiu trying • > run > newing macblot, doM tot 

repudiate and deny the false innsndoi Indulged in l.y the 

■ ■ ruin peculiarities (if Ban Frai 
ladles. One vituperous exchange says that all nl our girls wear 
low shoes, which gel lull of sand every other block, m> thai they 
have to stop ami bang to a lamppost while tiny empty the sboc. 
Another says lhat every young lady in San Francisco keeps a 
small dog. which she immediately takeH up In her lap when she 
(eels the manipulation of a Ilea, the result being that the Ilea leaps 
upon the dog. wbii h Is put out Into the hallway to »offer. The 
Plain J'tnlrr says that young married women take •■ fellows " to 
the theatre and treat them to Ice-cream. Now Hie Tows Cbixb 
knows at least twenty-seven young married women, and he has 
not tasted ice cream since he treated .Mrs. Town Cbibb a few weeks 
before he married. Still another paper says our girls are too free 
and go around uncbaperoned. Such calumnies as these discour- 
age our enterprise, and cast a gloom over our progress. Way the 
contumely of contempt rest on the bead of the man or woman 
who writes against the young ladies of this city! 

CHARLES R. BENNETT has ceased to act as an officer in the 
Society for the Suppression of Vice. There was a time when 
Mr. Bennett was looked on as a little bit, just a very little bit, 
purer than the angels. But tbat time was when he was placed 
at the head of the society which was to cleanse the town of sin 
and of all that pertains to sin. Now he is looked upon as being 
worse, just a little bit worse, than the devil. The fact is, there is 
no more sin for Bennett to suppress, for he has expurged all the 
badness of the town from the inhabitants thereof, and now it 
rests in its entirety on his shoulders, making him the greatest 
sinner of the lot. And then, in order to be consistent, he had to 
suppress himself I 

IT makes an honest Democrat 
Disconsolate and weary, 
To hear his Congressmen outshrill 
Czar Reed, or Dana, or Dave Hill 
In damning Wilson's tariff bill. 
You are discoursing through your hat, 
Tom Geary 1 
RE you aware, Your Honor," remarked the Proposed Trol- 
ley Electric Road in Mission street, » that the ninety per 
cent of property owners in the street who have petitioned for Me 
are more concerned about getting a road than about its operation? 
And what do they, or even you and the Supervisors, know about 
the latest improvements in street transportation? If I am adopted, 
I shall do my full duty in disfiguring the city and endangering 
lives and property, but I am getting tired of that. Would it not 
be wise for some of you to go East and learn something? Besides, 
my friend Chris. Evans has sent forme, as, having lost one of his 
bands, be needs me sorely." 

THERE is a silver half-dollar piece in a broker's window on 
Montgomery street which can be bought for $5. This settles 
at once and for all the question of demonetization. All you have 
to do is to keep a half-dollar forty-two years and it increases 1000 
per cent, in value. Acting on this idea, the Town Chiek has laid 
away twenty half-dollars, which in the year 1936 will be worth 
just $100. This sum we will spend for a monument to the Press 
Reform Association. [Since writing the above it has been found 
necessary to spend one of the half-dollars, but the remaining 
nineteen are safe in our vest pocket.] 

A" boy preacher " is stirring up the addled piety of Southern 
California. He is said to advance very heretical opinions, 
and we learn tbat a number of the old sort of parsons have agreed 
to make common cause against him. We counsel them not to 
resort to apostolic blows and whacks, but to rely on spiritual 
spanks. Let them equip themselves with theological mush- 
paddles and make a dead set again him. Tbey are a dead set 
themselves. 

CAPTAIN Frank Johnson, lately commander of the ill-fated 
City of New York, has turned his attention to popcorn, and is 
said to have got a very good thing by securing the sole conces- 
sion for the sale of that sweetmeat in the Midwinter Fair grounds. 
Perhaps he is experimenting on the lifting power of corn in the 
act of popping, with a view to its application in floating the 
wrecked ship. 

THE Rev. B. Fay Mills has at last found a use for the local 
church-houses. He thinks that they might be fitted up as 
sleeping quarters for the homeless poor. Perhaps the cushioned 
pews would make better beds than the gutter these chilly nights. 
But gracious! Suppose that Christ should happen to make His 
second advent in the guise of a mendicant, as He did before, and 
should find Himself in such a place as that! 

IT may have been observed that "Christopher" is the baptismal 
name of three of the most distinguished men of history — Chris- 
topher Columbus, Christopher Buckley and Christopher Evans. 
But the similarity does not end with that. 

ALL the world may be a stage, but to those who attend the 
amateur performances all the men and women are not actors. 



SAN" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



Jan. 13, 1894. 




THE daily newspapers, with their customary alertness in dis- 
covering the occurrence oE events that have not happened, 
and which, if they had happened, would in the very nature of 
things be kept close diplomatic secrets, have pulled aside the 
curtain of mystery and disclosed the Chinese and British govern- 
ments in the act of arranging an offensive and defensive treaty. 
Of course the disclosure is a pure fiction of the journalistic mind. 
The Chinese and the British have many common grounds that 
might develop into a cause for unity of action in matters in which 
Russia and France would be concerned; but the securement of 
this unity of action calls for no treaty. It will come as a natural 
outgrowth of the diplomaticsituation, and it is absurd to suppose 
that the British government would bind itself by treaty obliga- 
tions with a power whose military resources are so limited in 
order to secure that which the op( ration of other and obvious 
causes renders certain. Our esteemed and astute contemporaries 
should have learned by this time that that is not the way in 
which they conduct business in the Tower of London, where 
Queen Victoria rules in all her glory. 

Those who feel interested in watching the outcome of grafting 
representative institutions upon a purely autocratic and imperial 
system of government can find an instructive object lesson in 
Japan, where a Parliament, with uncertain and illogically fixed 
limitations of power, is now aiding the old Oriental dynasty in 
administering the public affairs. The results are peculiar. For 
instance, the Emperor appoints the presiding officer of the House 
of Representatives, but in doing so recognizee the wishes of the 
members and acts upon their nomination. Recently the gentle- 
man who occupies that position fell into disfavor with the House, 
whereupon it adopted an Address to bis Majesty, stating that it 
could no longer confide in its President and apologizing for its 
"lack of insight" in recommending him. This was as far as the 
Oriental sense of propriety would allow it to go in a communica- 
tion which was obviously intended as a request for the appoint- 
ment of a new officer. His Majesty, however, took the petition 
literally, and was unable to decide what "his faithful Commons" 
wanted; and so he sent them this answer: " Does the House de- 
sire Us to change the President? Else, do the members simply 
apologize for their want of insight?" When last heard from the 
Japanese statesmen were still hunting for some appropriate 
formula in which to intimate to bis august Majesty that a mis- 
take had been made in the selection of their presiding officer 
(which it was desired to correct), without by necessary implica- 
tion, involving his Majesty, as the real appointing power, in the 
commission of that mistake. 

By the way, the Japanese Minister of Finance, in presenting 
the imperial Budget for the coming year, gave some interesting 
figures regarding the commercial development of that country 
during the past year. The total foreign trade of last year, which 
amounted to 162 million yen, showed an increase of 68 per cent 
over that of 1887, of 242 per cent over that of 1882, and of 376 
per cent over that of 1872. The silk trade of the country is said 
to be in a very favorable condition, when compared with that of 
China, and general trade during the first ten months of the year 
which has just closed was 10,300,000 yen in excess of that of the 
previous year. In its gold expenditures, as a result of the de- 
preciation of silver, the country lost during the past year 1,423,000 
yen. Nevertheless the general financial and commercial condi- 
tion of the country is deemed to be good, and the government 
anticipates a surplus of five million yen. 

The British Tories and their journalistic allies are a stupid lot. 
By unduly obstructing the passage" of the Employers' Liability 
bill and the Parish Councils bill in the House of Commons, and 
so amending and emasculating the former, in the House of Lords, 
as practically to defeat its purpose, they have played directly 
into the hands of Mr. Gladstone, and that mistake they are now 
aggravating by raising a discussion and agitation over the inert- 
ness of Parliament in dealing with the public business and the 
great concerns of the empire. The direct object of this discussion 
and agitation is to cast blame and ridicule upon the present 
Ministry by inferentially fixing upon ita charge of incompetency. 
But this object is too grossly absurd to be attained, and, on the 
other hand, the agitation and discussion to which it has given 
rise cannot fail to serve as a practical argument on behalf of the 
Parliamentary federation of the islands (through a logical system 
of home rule) by focusing attention on the fact that, under the 
present system, the time of Parliament is too much taken up 
with subordinate and local affairs. 



In Germany there is a tierce agitation against the increase of 
the tobacco dulses which is proposed under the financial arrange- 
ments of the new Budget, and the proposed wine duties are but 
little less unpopular. However, the new army bills involve an 
additional national expenditure of 56.000,000 marks, and the 
money must be raised by taxation of some sort. It will not grow 
on trees. 

It is authoritatively stated that a movement is beginning to 
manifest itself in evangelical circles in Germany against the re- 
peal of the anti-Jesuit laws; nevertheless the repeal bill is a 
measure of imperial diplomacy and it will doubtless be carried. 

"Honesty is the best pol- 
icy." Nobody contradicts it. 

Your dealer can get lamp- 
chimneys that almost never 
break from heat, or those that 
break continually. Which does 
he get? Which do you get? 

Macbeth's "pearl top" and "pearl glass" are 
tough against heat ; not one in a hundred breaks 
in use. The glass is clear as well as tough. 
They are accurate, uniform. 

Be willing to pay more for chimneys that last 
till Lhey rot, unless some accident happens to them. 

Pittsburgh. Geo. A. Macbeth Co. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Ophir Silver Mining Company. 

location of principal place of business— _an Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Virginia, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Twentieth day of December, 1893, an assessment, No. 61. of 
Twenty five Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately, in United States Gold coin, to the 
Secretary, at the office of the company, Room 49, Nevada Block, 309 Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Saturday, the Twentieth Day of January, 1894, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made he- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 12th day of February, 1894, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 49, Nevada block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 

Mexican Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works — Virginia City Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the 16th day of December, 1893, an assessment (No. 49) of 25 cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States Gold Coin, to the Secretary of the said com- 
pany, at the office of the Company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 19th Day of January, 1894, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on TDESDAY, the 13th day of February, 1894, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHARLES E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



Lo- 



Chollar Mining Company. 

Location of Principal place of business— San Francisco, California, 
cation of works— Virginia. Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Eleventh day of December, 1893, an assessment (No. 37) of ten (10) 
Cents per share was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of the corporation, payable immediately in United States Gold Coin, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal, 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Monday, the 15th day of January. 1894. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the Sixth day of February, 
1894, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHARLES E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 
Locatiou of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Gold Hill, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors held on 
the 12th day of December, 1893, an assessment (No. 63) of Twenty Cents 
per shar^ was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 35, third iloor, Mills Building, San Francisco, Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the 16th Day of January, 1894, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and, unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the Sixth day of February, 1894, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising aDd 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAS. NEWLANDS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 35, third floor, Mills Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



Jan. 13. 



- .\ KK VNCISCO NEWS LETT! 



15 



N NOTES 



THERE are seven children :i the Gladstone firoHy. The old- 
est son. \V. a. Gladstone is Lord of the Manor of Hawarden. 
* dull, heavj. honest n %n. In [tot, none >»f the child ran 
has Inherited any of lbs (iraod Old Man's Intellectual vigor. 
Stephen, the second son rol Hawarden Charon; Henry, 

after a rather wild youth in India, leads the respectable life of a 
conntry gentleman, and Hei -t. the youngest son. has failed to 
find any sucress in public life In spile of the advantages with 
which be entered Parliament. Two of the daughters are married. 
The third. Miss Helen Gladstone, Is undoubtedly ttie cleverest of 
the children. She is a woman of rare culture and one of the 
leaders in the new movement for education for women. English 
people have always been fond of picturing the life of the Glad- 
stones io the quiet of Hawarden Ca?tle. It Is there the great com- 
moner gives full vent to all of his hubbies, and like most of the 
grand old men of this century — Bismarck. Ruskin. and the rest of 
them — he is a determined fa Mi?t. He collects porcelain, plays 
the violin, chops down trees and reads prayers in the viliage 
church. His woodcutting exploits are famous, but they are only 
part of the general scheme of health from which he has never 
varied. In bis Oxford days he was an indefatigable pedestrian, 
and now he may be seen almost any day iu London swinging 
along at a nimble pace. Wherever be is he takes his regular exer- 
cise. 

Everybody is rushing to see the tableaux vivants at the Palace 
Theatre. This magnificent edifice, built for an English opera 
house, has until quite lately been looked upon as a failure. It 
was turned into a music hall about two years ago, English opera 
having proved no attraction: but even at low prices people could 
not be induced to patronize it. The shareholders were in despair. 
But now all is changed, and the place is thronged every night, 
thanks to the tableaux, which are certainly the most daring things 
ever presented to a London audience. Still tbe County council 
have not yet interfered, although I heard rumors that they were 
going to do so last week. Meanwhile the thing goes merrily on, 
attracting all the society women and gay young men — old ones, 
too, for that matter — about town. The tableaux are certainly very 
beautiful and managed with infinite skill. The women are band- 
some and possessed of perfect figures. The rapidity with which 
the living pictures are changed is quite marvelous. The young 
woman who personates the Venus of Milo wears long black gloves 
nearly to the shoulders. As she is, of course, in white against a 
black background, she appears, like the statue, to be without arms. 

The Duke of Coburg, after consulting with tbe Queen and with 
the Prince of Wales, placed himself in communication with Lord 
Salisbury and Mr. Gladstone on tbe subject of his parliamentary 
allowance of £25,000 a year, which be has resolved to surrender; 
and this very generous decision will probably be formerly an- 
nounced by the Prime Minister in the House of Commons before 
Parliament adjourns. The Puke's allowance was granted to him 
by Act of Parliament, and only an Act of Parliament could take 
it away. This was settled in 1830, when it was proposed to de- 
prive Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (who had been elected 
King of the Belgians) of the allowance of £50,000 a year which had 
been voted to him for life on his marriage with the Princess Char- 
lotte. King Leopold kept both Claremont and the allowance, 
but he regularly repaid to the Treasury the bulk of the income, 
reserving only enough to defray his English pensions and the 
cost of maintaining Claremont. Ernest Duke of Cumberland did 
not give up his parliamentary allowance when he became King of 
Hanover in 1837, but continued to draw it until his death in 1851. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Confidence Silver Mining Company- 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 28th day of December, 1893, an assessment (No. 24) of twenty-five cts. 
per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, 414 California street, San Francisco, California. 
Any Btockiupon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the Thirtieth Day of January, 1 894, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore will be sold on TUESDAY, the 20th day of February, 1894, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expeuses of 
sale. By order of the Board of Directors. A. S. GKOTH, Secretary. 
Office— 414 California street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Kentuck Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 8 

Amount per Share 10 cents 

Levied Dec. 20,1898 

Delinquent in Office Jan. 24, 1894 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock Feb. 15, 1894 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

FRANK KENNEDY, LAW-OFFICE, ROOM 6fi, MDRPHY BUILDING, 
(Third floor), 1236 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



H. M. NEWHALL &. CO., 



SHIPPING « n ,l COMMISSION MERCHANTS 



GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS. 



Nos 309 and 311 Saniome Street, San Francisco. 
National a Cohfaht .... ->f Ireland 

A.TLA1 '■ VNY 0F London 

BOTLSTOH In Ml-ANY Of BOSTON 

Ocean Marine Inm raitoI or London 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Cnlitornin Savings and Loan Society. 

For the hall year ending December 31.1893, a dividend has been de- 

dared at the rate of i) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and 

four aud one-.sixth ! I i-fi per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free 

of taxe*. payable ou and niter TUESDAY, January 2, 1694. 



Office— Cor. Powell ami Eddi 



VKKNON OAMPBELL, Secretary, 
streets, S. F., Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half-year ending Dec. 31, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five and oiie-tt-nth (5 1-10) per cent, per annum on term deposits 
and four audoue fourth ( i'i) percent, per annum on ordinary deposits, pay- 
able on and after Tuesday, January 2, 1894. 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office— 52fi C alifornia .street. 

"DIVIDEND notTce. 

Savings and Loan Society. 

For the six months ending Dec. 31, 1893, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five (5) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four and 

one-sixth {4 1-6) per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, payable on and 

after Tuesday, January 2, 1893. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending with Dec. 31, 1893, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five per cent, per annum on Term Deposits and four and one 

sixth (4 1-6) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Tuesday, January 2, 1894. 

GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 
Office— 33 Post Street, San Francisco. Cal. 



Dividend notice. 



Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San Francisco, December 30, 1893. 
At a regular meeting of the hoard of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has beeu declared at the rate of four and one-quarter {&%) 
per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending Dec. 81, 1893, 
free from all taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1894 

R J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Office— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Street. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



San Francisco Savings Union. 
For the half year ending Dec. 31, 1893, a dividend has been 1 declared at 
the rate of five per cent, per annum on term deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-61 per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Tuesday, January 2, 1894. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 
Office— 326 California street, corner Sanscme. Branch— 1700 Market St.,, 
corner Polk. 

ANNUAL MEETINi. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada 
Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 
room 15, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fraueisco, Cal,, on, 
Wednesday, the 1 7th day of January, 1894, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Saturday, January 13, 1894, at the 
hour of 12 o'clock m. E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 

Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Pajaro Valley Railroad Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Pajaro Valley 
Railroad Company will be held at the office of the company, 327 
Market street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday, the 15th ray of January, 1894, at the hour of 11 O'clock A. M. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and for the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer hooks will close on Thursday, January 4, 1894, at 3 
o'clock P. M. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office— 327 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING- 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Oceanic Steam- 
ship Company will be held at the office of the company, 327 Market St., 
San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday, the 22d Day of January, 1 894, at the hour of 1 1 o'clock A. M., 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on THURSDAY. January 11th, 1894, 
at 3 o'clock p. m. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary 

Office— 327 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 13, 1894. 




B-A-HSTIKS. 



SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour is steady; Extras, J3.4)@[3.59. Superfine, $2.40@$2.60. 

Wheat is light: Shipping, $1.07; Milling. fl.OSrdXl.lO per cental. 

Barley is slack; Brewing, 82!iC.@92 , =c. Feed, 70c.@75c. per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, J1.129W.2J; Feed, Jt.05i9ll.10 per ctl. 

Com, White, 95c. ; Yellow, 90c.@95c. per ctl. 

Rye is quiet, lair demand, Jl 02'^ Cement, J2.00@J2.25. 

Hay is steady; Wheat, J10@I14; Oats, J10:g)J12; Alfalfa, J8@J10. 

Millstuffs, go'od demand. Bran, J16®517 per ton. 

Beans, light request, J1.65#J2.10 per ctl. Potatoes, 4)c.@75c. per ctl. 

Butter is higher: Choice, 30c.@35c. ; Fair, 17c.@18c. 

Cheese, light stock, 10c.@13c. Eggs, iree supply, 35c.@40c 

Honey, Comb, 10c.@12c. ; Extracted, 4c. @5c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth Jl.t-0@J1 20. Beeswax is steady, at 22c.@23c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Hides are steady; Dry, 5c.@6e. Wool is in light demand at 7e.@12c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 7!4e. 

Coffee sluggish at2)c,@22c. for C. A. Cauned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coalis pleutiful; large stock. Nnts and ready sale. Hops, 16c. @18c. 

Quicksilver is nominal at J31 per flask. 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws and Refined. White. 4%c.(3$c. 
January 4th was a busy day at the Custom House. The d at es 
paid in aggregated $54,381.72. The Chinese paid largely on goods 
per Gaelic. The Pacific Can Company paid in one lump $30,299, 
on the withdrawal from bond of a cargo of tin that arrived here 
per Br. ship Fulwood in August last, say 1500 bxs., duty $2.20 
per box. Nearly all was paid in paper money, which is some- 
thing quite unusual with us, and all but a $1000 and a $500 bill 
were in small bills — $1 up. 

Recently free shipments of Hawaiian Kice have been made by 
rail to Chicago and New York ; some twenty car loads have gone 
to Brie, Penn., and other cities on the Atlantic; present prices 
3Jc. The report is unfavorable to the Rice crop in Japan. 

The Pacific Mail steamship Acapulco sailed hence for Panama 
and way ports on the 8th inst., carrying cargo for Central America 
valued at $41,754, consisting in part of 4516 bbls. Flour, 4000 galls. 
Wine, 2488 sks. Salt, 18,167 lbs. Malt and Provisions; for Mexico, 
43 pkgs. Machinery, 100 flaks. Quicksilver, 60,000 lbs. Beans, etc., 
value $15,261; to Panama, 430 bbls. Flour and Provisions, value 
$2306; to Ecuador, 1069 bbls. Flour, value $3511. The Acapulco 
also carried to Central America $32,000 in gold coin. 

Fruit growers have formed an association whereby they agree 
to sell their citrus and other fruits at public auction. The first 
sale of oranges was on Monday last; 1000 bxs. sold for cash, 
Navels bringing $2@$2.25 per box for fancy, and $1.75@$2 for 
choice, seedlings $1.25 per box. 

The steamer City of Sydney arrived on the 8th inst., with 3823 
bags Central American Coffee; from Mexico, 576 bxs. Limes, etc., 
and from South America 100 bags Coffee and $2368 in Treasure. 

The steamer Gaelic, for the Orient, sailed on the 9th inst., 
carrying in treasure $294,134; say to Hongkong, $209,614; to 
Japan, $84,520, and for cargo to Hongkong, 6548 bbls. Flour, 7376 
lbs. Ginseng, Provisions, etc., value $55,353; to Japan, 1512 bbls. 
Flour, 69 pkgs. Leather, etc., value $25,650; elsewhere, Canned 
Goods, value $1000. 

The failure of W. F. Beck & Co. is announced. They were 
largely engaged in dried and canned fruits, salmon, etc. 

Charters — A slight improvement in grain freights is to be 
noted. The Br. ship Travancore, 1878 tons, has been chartered 
to load wheat for Cork, U. K., Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk, at 
£1 6s. 3d. Br. bark British Princess, 1480 tons, now on the 
Columbia, Wheat thence to Cork, etc., as above, £1 12s. 6d. 

Salmon The receipts at this port for the season 1893 to date 

aggregate 605,584 cases. 

The recent cold weather has been more or less injurious to the 
Citrus fruits in Southern California. In two or three instances 

the entire Lemon crop of individuals has been killed. Not so 

with the Oranges. Possibly five per cent of the entire crop will 

be the extent of the injury, and yet the entire crop of the State, 

both of Oranges and Lemons, will be the largest yet gathered. It 
is a curious fact that the Orange crop has escaped all injury at 

the North. In fact, the bulk of the crop in Northern California 
has been marketed. 

Dynamite The schr. Czar, for San Bias, sailed on the 6th inst. 

with cargo valued at $21,085, consisting in part of 105,000 lbs. 
Dynamite, 700 cs. Coal Oil, 1000 galls. Wine, 1750 lbs. Sulphur, 
684 bdls. Shooks, etc. 

Quicksilver receipts at this port in 1893, 26,034 flsks; in 1892; 
21,686 flsks., an increase in 1893 of 4348 flsks. Exports in 1893, 
16,571 flsks., of the value $641,060; 1892, 8108 flsks., value 
$334,747. Increase in 1893, 8463 flska., value $306,313. The 
movement by sea last year was the largest since 1887, when our 
exports reached 18,619 flsks. 

Exports to Honolulu per schr. Robert Lewers, 881 bbls. Flour, 
300 M. Shingles, 2300 galls. Wine, etc., value $20,000. 

Caroline Islands, per schr. Tulenkun, Lumber, Shingles, Bread, 
3164 lbs. Tobacco, etc., value $2338. 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Northeast Corner California and Sansoine Streets, 

Formerly Occupied by Bank of WellB, Fargo & Co. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, June 30, 1893 928,058,691 OO 

Uuarantee Capital and Surplus 1,699,434 OO 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, president; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas, 
Magee, E. B. Fond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell Wbite, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans onlyon real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
Sarties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
ank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for passbook or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST CO. 

Paid-up Capital, »1, COO. OOO. 

Corker Montgomery and California Streets, San Francisco. 

J. D. FRY, President ... HENRY WILLIAMS, Vice-President 

J. Dalzell Brown. Secretary and 1 reasurer. 

This company is authorized by law to act as Executor, Administrator, 
Assignee, Receiver or Trustee . It is a legal depositary for Court and Trust 
Funds. Will take entire charge of Real and Persoual Estaies, collecting 
the income and profits, and attending to all such details as an individual 
iu like capacity could do. 

Acts as Registrar and Transfer Agent of all Stocks and Bonds. 

Receives depo&its subject to check and allows interest at the rate of two 
per cent per annum on daily balances. Issues certificates of deposits 
bearing fixed rates of interest. 

Receives deposits in its savings department from ?1 upwards, and allows 
the usual rate-, of interest thereon. 

The rate of interest on Term Deposits for six months, ending June 30, 
1893, was at 5 per cent per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits ± 1-6 per 
cent per annum. 

RKM.s SAFES inside its burglar-proof vaults at prices from $5 per 
annum upwards, according to size. Valuables of all kinds may be stored 

WILLS DRAWN AND TAKEN CARE OF WITHOUT CHARGE. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 1,390,000 

Southeastcor^er Bush and Sansome Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE 60 LOMBARD 8TREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops. Nanaimo, 
and Nelson— British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Tacoma, 
Washington. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK— Merchants Bank of Canada; CHICAGO— First National 
Bank; LIVERPOOL— North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British 
Linen Company; IRELAND— Bank of Lreland; MEXICO— London Bank of 
Mexico; SOUTH AMERICA— London Banfe of Mexico and South America; 
CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; 
AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of Australasia and Commer- 
cial Banking Company of Sydney, Ld. ; DEMERARA and TRINIDAD 
(West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,00000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (Jan. 1, 1893) 3,276,486 60 

WM. ALVORD, President. 

Thomas Brown Cashier | I. F. Moulton, 2d Assistant Cashier. 

3. Prentiss Smith, Asst. Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

NEW YORK— Agency of The Bant of California. BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank. LONDON— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. PARIS— 
Messrs. De Rothschild Freres. VIRGINIA CITY (Nev.)— Agency of The 
Bank of California. CHICAGO— Union National Bank. ST. LOUIS— Boat- 
men's Bank. ADSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND— Bank of New Zealand. 
CHINA, JAPAN and INDIA— Chartered Bankofludia, Australia and China. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake, 
Denver. Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, 
Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital paid up 2.450,000 

Reserve 490.000 

San Francisco Office. 424 California St. I London Office 73 Lombard SI..E . c 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch, 1166 Pacific Avenue. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan 4 Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
ohange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. ^ 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE OAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND f 1,770,000 OO. 

Deposits Jan 2, 1894 30,018,739 24 

Officers— President, EDW. KRU8K ; Vice-President, B. A. BECKER; 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. MULLER. Board of Directors— Edw. Kruse, George H. 
Eggers, O. Schoemann. F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. 
Simon, Ign. Steinhart, Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 



Jan. 13, 18F-J. 



SA3 1'KAV BOO NEWS LETTER 



17 



TftE RoSEjfrljL 




A SONG OF SUNLIGHT.— Longman* Magazine. 

LIKE and dealb, and the power of love, and the strength of 
laughter; 
Music of battle, and ships thai sail away to the vresl ; 
All that hath gone before and nil that followeth after; 

The mad, bliod struggle for gold, and the reckless seeking for 
rest. 
The brain reels round with them all, and weariness is their name. 

Dome to the long, low moorland and hear, ere the winter win it, 
Where the broom, like a sunlit beacon, Hashes in golden (lame, 

The music of wind and water, of the bee and the mountain linnet. 
Blue is the sky overhead and purple the heather about us, 

Far on the dim horizon the white sails gleam in the haze; 
One is the dream within and the song that is ours without us, 

The joy of the sun-steeped present] struck free from the whirl of 
the days. 
Hark ! how she sings in the fern a passionless song of content. 

The wren, now hanging a moment where the foxglove's bells are 
shaken. 
Now by the water's edge the iris bowed as she went, 

Weaving her melody out of her sweets by the way she has taken. 

Sing, little bird in the willows, low by the edge of the river, 

A song that ripples and leaps as the waters leap in a spring; 
The wind breathes low in the grass where the threads of the gossa- 
mer quiver, 

And all the sunlit moorland is silent to hear you sing. 
Sing that life is glad, and fair are the land and the sea, 

The wonder of stars in the night, and the noontide's golden glory, 
Oars is the joy of the present, we care not what is to be, 

And the past is dim as a dream, or a half remembered story ! 



A SKATING SONG.— Outing. 



Whisper a song as we glide along, ye pines on the Southern shore; 
From your branches long, where the cradle song of the South. Wind 

plays no more ; 
Whisper of memories that you hold in the heart of your great green 

boughs, 
Of a Summer's wine that was yours and mine, when the days were 

long and the nights weren't cold ; 
Of the whispers heard, and the warm love told, and the old, old vows. 

King with the tune, oh, thou broad lagune, of my steel-clad shining 

feet. 
As I skate away to the end of day where the Twilight and Moonlight 

meet, 
Ring with the plashes of oars that plied on your bosom in nights gone 

by, 
To a tale oft told that will ne'er grow old, tho' the nights grow long 

and the days wax cold, 
And the ice has formed in an iron mould o'er your old, old tide. 

Echo a line, oh, thou stream of mine, of the song of thy great unrest 
To this heart of mine from that heart of thine, 

While I speed to the red-rimmed West. 
Echo of faces that used to grow 

On your face, ere the ice and rime 
Had come to frown all your ripples down ; 

When your face had the blush of a sunset's glow, 
And the winds that blew weren't the winds that blow in the Winter 

time. 



LONDON SNOW. 






When men were all asleep the snow came flying 

In large white flakes falling on the city brown, 
Stealthily and perpetually settling, and loosely lying, 

Hushing the latest traffic of the drowsy town ; 
Deadening, muffling, stifling its murmurs failing; 

Lazily and incessantly floating down and down ; 
Silently sifting and veiling road, roof, and railing ; 

Hiding difference, making nnevenness even, 
Into angles and crevises softly drifting and sailing. 

All night it fell, and when full inches seven 
It lay in the depth of its uncompacted lightness, 

Its clouds blew off from a high and frosty heaven ; 
And all awoke earlier for the unaccustomed brightness 

Of the winter dawning, the strange unheavenly glare; 
The eye marveled — marveled at the dazzling whiteness; 

The ear hearkened to the stillness of the solemn air; 
No sound of wheel rumbling nor of foot falling, 

And the busy morning cries came thin and spare. 



BANKS. 



WELLS. FAR60 k CO.'S BANK. 

W. V. , iirii.r MNiiNomr ami Miller -Street*. 

-.„., SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $6,250,000 00 

JOHN J. VALENTIN! President 

FJomeeB. Kino . m«,„!.I' 

H. WlMWOETH ... t'nihler' 

KL.Lir*AN Assistant Cashier. 

„ _ , , BRANCHES. 

Surl? ,'," y H - B - PARSONS, Cashier. 

bait Lake city J. E. DOOLY, Cashier. 

T , „ , DIRECTORS: 

John J. Valentine, IVnJ. P. Cheney. Oliver EMrl.luc, Henry E. Htlntlnc- 
ton Homer S.M.K-. Geo. E. Gray, John J. McCook, Clms. F. Crocker. 
Dudley Evans. • 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

_ .„ . "• w - Corner SnuNome ami Knsli streets. 

oW/aft ^ «• s - De m- 00 

5HSB&" ^ffl|^TSM N FiTS :E: «^^? 

JAMES MOFFITT.. Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

_ DIRECTORS: 

2 e( !v ' £*> w ' George C. Perkins, 8. G. Murphy, 

N Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffltt! 

ThomasJenningB, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 
?<\FE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 
„ . , JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Saies to rent from $6 to ?100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 
the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hou rs,8A. M,to6r.M, 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, " 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Bulldina 

Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. 

r , „ OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES D. PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY ..'.'..'.".'.'.•. '.'.Vice-Presidents 

Directors — James G. Fair, Edward Barron, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker. James D. Phelan, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader 
and Frank J. Sullivan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
securities. GEO. A. STORY, CaVhter. 

Deponts may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. £. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized 56,000,000 I Paid up 11600 000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700 000 

Head Office— 8 Angel i.ourt, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. 4 W. Sell man & Co., 21 Broad Btreet. 
The Bank transacts a general banking tusinesB, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
wo „ „'? eIld6 blUs for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEIN HART |„ 

P. N.LILIENTHAL.i Managers 
A. L. SELIGMAN, Cashier. 



LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. w. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Stbscrlbtd Capital $2,500,030 | Paid Up Capital $2,000 000 

Reserve Fund $760,000 

Head Office 68 Old Broad Street, London 

A9ENT8— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.).No. 10 Wall St.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17Boule 
yard PoisBOniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, I „„„„„„„ 
C. ALTSCHUL, I Managers, 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital.. 81,250.000. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 
JAMESK. WILSON '. ..President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD. Vice-President. L. I. COWGILL, Cashier. 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents : New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer A Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 



SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 



222 MoiilsomeiT St., Mills Bnlldlng. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS: 

William Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O.D.Baldwin A. K. P. Harmon, 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones J . B. Randol. 



THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAI0-UP CAPITAL t1.000.0no. 

nlHeCTORS : 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, I E. B. POND. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN VICE-PBEBIDENT. 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY- 

No. 18 Geary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November 24. 1869 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President | ERNST BRAND Secretary 



18 



SA>f FRANCISCO NEWS LETTE&. 



Jan 13, 1894 




MANY of the slim and, in some cases, rather melancholy-look- 
ing clerks and oinor officials in the big banking and com- 
mercial houses down town have wan faces and red eyes when 
they go to work nowadays, says the New York Sun. Some of 
them are sleepy over their books, and nearly alt of them show 
considerable mental and physical fatigue, but their dullness is 
viewed with an indulgent eye by their superiors. There is a sort 
of tacit understanding that the rules must be violated to a certain 
extent for a lime, and some indulgence must be extended to men 
who dance until three or four oxlock in the morning, and who are 
called again at eight. The dearth of well-bred, presentable and 
attractive young men at dances is so great that many of the em- 
ployees of the big banks and extensive financial institution are 
invited regularly to the houses of the wives of eome of the higher 
officials of the concerns for which they work. City life during 
the social season is a racking one, and it ia a question whether 
nine-tenths of tbe young dancing men of society would not wel- 
come an opportunity to escape from an existence that is not all 
that fancy paints it by any means. Some amusement was caused 
at the Patriarchs' ball by two of tbe most prominent bankers in 
town, who took their wives on tbe floor at 11 o'clock, then calm- 
ly went upstairs to rooms which they had pievioualy engaged, 
and went to sleep tranquilly until 3:30, when they were awak- 
ened, and returned in time to take their wives home in the small 
hours of the morning. But the clerks aDd the young business 
men could not follow this scheme. They had to keep the wives 
and daughters dancing while the capitalists slept. 

Obvious effort in the way of entertaining is considered bad form 
in the best houses. Any eccentricity in table decoration or stud- 
ied effects of any kind are, therefore, to be avoided. The finest 
of damask, the best of cutlery, the most brilliantly polished sil- 
ver and glass and choice flowers in greater or less profusion, ac- 
cording to the character of the entertainment, are deemed all-suf- 
ficient by those who are in tbe habit of receiving their world con- 
stantly and as a matter of course. " New people," who are not 
only willing, but eager, to go to any amount of trouble and ex- 
pense in tbe way of commending themselves to society, not in- 
frequently overreach themselves and begin all wrong (a fatal mis- 
take, by the way, as to begin right is all important), through a 
want of perception and too much effort. " Mrs. Outeredge will 
never get on," was tbe verdict pronounced by a social magnate 
on a socially ambitious woman of her acquaintance. " I lunched 
there yesterday, and everything was most offensively rich and 
studied — twenty people at the table— gold threaded damask — a 
present with each bunch of Sowers — and even to tbe eatables, 
everything was a surprise. It was very wearisome, and all a 
mistake; I really felt like telling her so." 

Old records say that the law once took a hand in reducing the 
size of women's sleeves in Venice. That was in 1303. and its ef- 
fect was soon seen in the extravagant trains that women added 
to their gowns. As soon as the puzzled law makers realized 
what was the matter, they cartailed the skirt by a second edict, 
to be again circumvented by thegreat magnificence of both skirts 
and sleeves, which were blazoned with embroideries of gold, and 
set with precious stones. These, too, were enacted out of fashion, 
but only while the women were getting breath for a fresh con- 
test, and a sleeve that exceeded in cost anything that had gone 
before, for they were both wide and long, reaching even the hem 
of the dress. These were the arm coverings that called forth the 
last fiat from the Venetian Senate. 

There is a great change in society handshaking. Now, when 
offering to shake hands with a person especialy smart and fash- 
ionable, the elbows are no longer to be exalted and stuck out. 
This has quite gone out. The proper thing is to abase the elbow, 
stick the hand straight up, and touch the finger tips of your 
friend. The uninitiated, who have only just got into the "pump- 
handle" way, are taken quite aback when they find they are 
obliged to stop for a responsive shake about three feet from the 
ground. The question is, who starts these eccentric fashions? 



To the World's Fair ! 
Are you going ? If so, it will be to your interest to call on or write 
to the undersigned before arranging for your trip. The SANTA FE 
ROUTE is the only line under one management from California to 
Chicago. The only line running Pullman Palace and tourist sleep- 
ing cars through to Chicago on the same train every day without 
change. Personally conducted excursions through to Boston leave 
every Tuesday. W. A. BISSELL, 650 Market street, "Chronicle" 
Building, San Francisco. 

Husbands, brothers and bachelors wishing to obtain the best 
gentlemen's furnishing goods and latest tailoring should go to John 
W. Carmany, 25 jCearny street. 



xnsrsTTE,^_nsrcs. 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company, 
OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL, $1,000,000. | ASSETS, $3,000,000. 
AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., 
Gen'l Managers. 

40 to 44 PINE STREET, NEW YORK. 

Assets 12,607,675 76 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,139,756 99 

HAZARDS INSURED. 

EMPLOYERS AND PUBLIC LIABILITY, 
BOILER EXPLOSION, 
GENERAL CASUALTY, 
ELEVATOR ACCIDENT, 
SPRINKLER LOSSES. 
GENERAL ACCIDENT, AND 
FIDELITY. 
B0LGER & BURLING, General Agents, 

403 California Street. 

William Macdonald, Manager. D. E. Miles, Ass't Manager. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

OP LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $10,831,5 O 

Net Surplus Over all Liabilities 3,116,305 



315 Montgomery Street, 



San Francisco 



NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORTCOSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity. 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for Sail 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and Btnutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rate*. 
Office of the Company, 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank, 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OP HAMBURG, GERMANY. 

fieo. Leonard and H. Danker, Managers p. t. for the Pacific Coast 

Branch, 

220 Sansome St., S. F. 

Capital $1,500,000 00 

Infested in U. S 640,346.23 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
Z32 California St., S. F.,<al. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO- of New York., 
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO,, of Toronto- 

A. R. GURREY, Manages. | C. A. STUART, AS8T. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 
BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL »6,70O,O00 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 California Street. San Francltco 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, 

413 California Street, San Francisco 



Jan. 13, 1894. 



SAN n:\-v IS( NTJWS I. II I I i; 



10 




X5UNBOM5 



SHE knitted a ti.iy 
With consummate c»re, 
And put it oo >i\le at 
A littlt- church fair. 
A pioaa young ivilow 
Attended the Mir, 
And purchased the tidy 
To put on his chair. 
lie fixed it oo 9nioothly, 
He did, on the chair, 
And early thereafter 

He learned how to swear. 

— Detroit Free Press. 
Mk. Upton— Where's my hat ; Mrs. Upton— I declare I never saw 
such helpless creatures as men are. Can't move a step without a 
woman to look after them. A woman can keep track of her own 
things, the children's and her husband's, and run a boarding house 
besides, while a mau can't so much as rind his hat without making 
some poor, overworked woman jump up and get it for him. Here's 
your hat just where you left it wnenyoucamein. On your way down 
town stop at the " Daily AllthenewV office and leave this advertise- 
ment. " What's it about ?" " Rooms and board for gentlemen only." 

— New York Weekly. 
A Tenant went to see his landlord about a house he had rented, 
and about which he had some taull to find. He mentioned several 
drawbacks, and theu said: " And furthermore, Mr. Oppeuheimer, 
the cellar is full of water." Mr. Oppenheimer, the landlord, eyed him 
with reproach, and then exclaimed : " Vull of vater ? Veil, "vat you 
expect ? Vull of champagne ? " —Harper's Bazar. 

There's not a place in earth or heaven, 
There's not a task to mankind given, 
There's not a blessing or a woe, 
There's not a whisper, yes or no. 
There's not a life, or death, or birth 
That has a feathei's weight of worth 
Without a woman in it. 
Tom Ochiltree is fond of telling stories about his ocean trips, but 
one of the best is that which he told last night: " I was coming across, 
and a very good sort of a Britisher used to sit with me in the smoking 
room. I tried all my best jokes on him, and he never cracked a 
smile. At last I got angry and I said : ' 1 don't think an Englishman 
could see a joke if you tired it at him out of a gun.' And then that 
blessed Englishman stood un on his hind legs and said: ' How can 
you fire a joke out of a gun? ' " — New York Journal. 

The other morning the Saunterer met Katy, the washerwoman, on 
the street. " Good morning, Katy." said the Saunterer. Katy made 
a courtesy. "The top o' the niornin' to ye," she answered. " Where 
have youbeen this morning, Katy ? " "' To the cimitery, yer honor, 
an oh? it would amuse yer to see how the place has growed." 

— Boston Budget. 
This world is all a fleeting show 

For man's infatuation; 
A little rain, a little show, 
You plod along and reap and sow, 
Life's journey done — away you go 
To swell the conflagration. 

— Nebraska Stale Journal. 
Jimssn (who has read Bret Harte and is now registering for the 
first time at a far-away western hotel)— Say, stranger, if you hev a 
corner where I can bunk up fur the night, which the same I'm mean- 
in' to do, fix er up while I takes a swig of tanglefoot. Clerk of the 
Far Western Hotel— I beg your pardon, my dear sir, but I do not 
quite comprehend your meaning. Just wait till I ring for our inter- 
preter. — Ex. 

Wibbs— Didn't that fortune-teller phophesy that a dark-com- 
plexioned woman would make trouble for you? Slopay— Yes. 
Wibbs— Well, the prophesy has come true. Slopay (nervously)— It 
has ? What do you mean ? Wibbs— Your colored washwoman is 
waiting at your room and says she's going to stay there until she gets 
what you owe her. —Buffalo Courier. 

I asked her for a kiss that night, 

She gently told me "No." 
Then, reaching for the chandelier, 
She turned the gas down low. 

— Detroit Free Press. 
She (with emotion)— Do you really care for me just as much as 
when we were first engaged? He (with conviction)— Yes, lovey, 
every single bit as much. And at the time this conversation took 
place they had been engaged just fourteen hours, eight minutes and 
twenty-five seconds. —Chicago Record. 

Blobbs— Hobbs is a very considerate fellow. Slobbs— What makes 
you think so ? Blobbs— I had an attack of grip last week, and he is 
the only man I know who didn't suggest a sure cure. 

—Philadelphia Record. 

Because a thing is small in size, 

Think not 'twill pay to scorn it, 
Some insects have a larger waist, 

But lift less than the hornet. — Le Pasteur. 
Mr. Saphead (during the honevmoon)— When did my little duckie 
darling first discover that she loved me V Bride (sweetly)— When I 
found myself getting mad every time any one called you a fool. 

— New York Weekly. 



PutlonUi ran to uniforms, ranllai and mil it.. 

comrementa at tin . nblUhmenl of Colonel J. M. Lu 

ton •■■ full ,.f id. [gm ,,f 

clotha, and bl . i for their perfect irorkmanshli 

"' ""' i"-i idling sun. ,, 1IH . ,>,,,,, ,!,,„ establishment. 



XJSTfciU K.-A.JM CJ£i. 



PACIFIC DEPABTMEWT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. n. 1821. 
Paid-up Capital, • • > ..000,000. 
Cash Assets, $2S,1M,M0, 



OF LONDON. 

Fouuded a. d. 1710. 

Cash Assets, 110,044,712. 

Assets lu America, - - - J2,610,3(J8. 



W.H. J. U MiHts, 1,'fn'l tk'fnt, 20» Sannonn St., San Franrixfo, Cal. 

THE NEW EN6LAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets SI9.724.638.46. 

Presldeut. BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. | Vloe-Pres., ALFRED D. FOSTER 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Building Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Co. Limited, of London. 
The Imperial Insurance Co. Limited, of London 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager 

Pacific Branch, 221 Saiisome St., S. F. 

SWAIN & MURDOCK, City Agents. 



FIRE 



THE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BASLE. OP ST. GALL. OF ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 

410 California St.. San Francisco, Cal 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE UOMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 2,125,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6,124,057.80 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street. San Francisco. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YOHK. 

Capital Paid Dp f 500,000 

AsBets 8,181,758 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,525,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 
City Office— 501 Montgomery St. General QtM ce— 401 Wont's:, St. 

AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. 

Established 1825. 
Capital, $2,250,000. Total Assets, 86,854,663.65 

United States Department: 204 SANSOME ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

VOSS, tONRAD A CO., General Managers. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

r Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1886.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Street. 
BHE O. F. CHANT, Manager 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH AMERICA 

JMF"01dest Stock Fire Insurance Company in the United States. 

Capital Pally Paid »3,000,OOo 

OF PHILADELPHIA, Penh. 
Office Pacific Defabtment— 

412 California Street, San Francisco. 
JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 13, 1894 . 




Qf- 



I WONDER how many winters it will be, saya a writer in the 
London Gentlewoman, before we take with real enthusiasm to 
the notion of wearing knickerbockers beneath our dresses in the 
daytime instead of petticoats. I am certain we shall ultimately 
come to these, tbey are so convenient, and they can be made so 
extremely decorative. Then, again, they unquestionably possess 
the advantage ot extra warmth. 1 like them of black satin 
buckled to the knee, worn with gaiters, and tbese in no way, as 
some people imagine Ihey do, spoil tbe hang of a skirt, especially 
the skirt of to-day, which may be relied upon to set without any 
assistance save tbat rendered by its own voluminous folds. But, 
while I think of it, I must tell you that the skirt of tbe day is 
no longer lined up with stiff stuff, but wadded up to the waist 
with very thin wadding, be it understood, and, of course, cov- 
ered with silk or satin, and, it being considered quite unneces- 
sary to rustle, the softer make of silk is preferred. A capital way 
of trimming a plain skirt is with an enormous piping at the ex- 
treme hem, this is to be half an inch thick and covered with satin 
or velvet. Another pretty trimming takes the form of a vandyke 
of ribbon outlined with lace. But let me discourse further on 
knickerbockers; let me urge you, even if you adopt them for the 
daytime — which I candidly think a most desirable proceeding — 
to cling to your petticoats for tbe evenings; these are essential to 
grace in dancing, and the pretty lace frills are too fascinating to 
be dispensed with. But if you keep faithful to petticoats for the 
daytime, then you must be sure to avoid lace flounces; these are 
a great mistake. For winter wear all trimmings should be flat, 
rows of ribbon, or velvet, or galloon, or lace insertion, whichever 
you wish, but tbe frills and flounces must be discarded, for they 
are apt to get entangled in your heels, and somehow or other no 
matter how short you have your petticoats cut, the mud invari- 
ably finds its way to such decorations. 

Custom now allows the introduction of a bit of color in fasten- 
ing tbe veil or in the train of the wedding dress. Thus a superb 
dress of ivory satin to be worn by a January bride has a train of 
gold and silver brocade, actually shimmering in yellow as the 
bride passes up the isle. Another bride, to whom the dead white 
of veil and dress was declared extremely trying, wore a fillet of 
rose-pink velvet around her dark hair just where the veil was 
fastened. 



To carry one's fan in the hand or swing from the arm is no 
longer de rigueur. A fan bag is an essential part of the fashion- 
able evening toilet. Of satin brocade or kid, with jewels sprinkled 
in aimless fashion across its surface, the bag adds quite a dash 
of prettiness to its wearer's costume. Long satin ribbons are 
added, through which tbe wrist is thrust. 

A novel idea in the way of trimming is the putting of bands of 
broadcloth upon velvet skirts and waists. The cloth must be a 
very fine, firm quality, and the bands, which are bias, must be 
nicely lined with muslin. The muslin lining is imperative if the 
effect is to be good. The oddity of the trimming gives it a stylish 
appearance. 



Crepons are considerably less the rage than they were last sea- 
son, French cashmere, camel's hair sacking in its various quali- 
ties and effects, serge and vigogne being strong rivals. However, 
they are still very much the fashion, and in the heavy qualities 
show tempting colors for winter wear. 

Made muffs of satin and velvet are trimmed with ostrich 
plumes or bands of fluffy fur. The ends of the muff are of vel- 
vet, full plaited, and a band of folded satin around the middle, 
with a puff or rosette at one side. 

There is something quite new in veils, namely, thin materials 
plaited in the form of a fan, and pinned on the bonnet at the top, 
the plaits opening over the face. They are made both in black 
and white, and hail from Paris. 



The half tone engravings, whicb for a long time have been a 
popular and artistic feature of the News Letter, are from the studio 
of Bolton & Strong, of 430 Pine street. The firm, which give par- 
ticular attention to this line of work, are at the head of their pro- 
fession upon the Pacific Coast. Their half-tone engravings are un- 
excelled in the West. They have far more than a local reputation, 
being widely known as excellent artists and artisans. 

Steedman's Soothing Powders successfully used for children, dur- 
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Mothers be sure and use "Mrs. Winslows' Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething. 



WWL 



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NOW IN PROGRESS. 

STARTLING 
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See daily papers for particulars. 




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Jnn . 13, 1894 . 



BAM n:\\. i->, NEWS LI DTE! 



81 



A<ITY"£ growth la DO*fto#d 1:1 n» improvement*. San Fran- 
cisco it an exception, for ibe has ftrowr, but ha« not been im- 
proved aa much aa could be wished. It ia true that we have tall 
buildings and beautiful home? hot these are th? monuments of 
private wealth. There i* nothing of a public nature in Ibis city 
that would lead one to believe that the august Boards of Super- 
visors of the past had ever promulgated an act that would bene- 
fit the people. Time aft*»r time has the Rswa Letter scolded the 
fathers of the city, but. like the had boys at school, tbey take 
their whipping and then return to their misdoings wiih renewed 
vigor. We have urged the Superintendent of Streets to take a 
look at the grip slot of the Perries and Cliff-bouse cable-road, 
which is much wider than the law allows in certain places, mak- 
ing it dangerous for buggies and light wagons. We have shown 
time and again bow loosely tbe basalt blocks have been placed in 
the street*, and we have urged that a bridge be built over tbe 
driveway at tbe entrances to the Midwinter Fair in Golden Gate 
Park. Now we are going to speak of tbe necessity of having 
bridges for pedestrians to cross Market street. Tbe large number 
of cars and wagons tbat pass up and down that thoroughfare in 
in an endless line fill tbe lives of the paesers-by with fear. There 
are a large number of people in tbis town who will not cross 
Market street for this reason, and ladies never think of going 
over to the south side of Market street for articles they could buy 
elsewhere. As a result, merchants who have stores on tbe other 
side of Market street have small profit, and can pay but small 
rents, and therefore tbe property is not worth so much. This 
may not seem plausible, but it is true. Nearly all the shopping 
that is done down town is done on the north side of Market 
street. 

Now what the News Letter would like to see would be three 
bridges across Market street — one at the junction of Geary and 
Kearny streets, another at the junction of Powell and Eddy 
streets, and a third at the janciion of Jones and McAllister 
streets. Then the great mats of people who now walk on one 
side of the street would be able to get across without fear, and tbe 
deadly dummy would bave to find a new field for its victim?. If 
the city ever cares to look into tbis suggestion, the News Letter 
will think tbat it has been paid for offering it. Tbe value of the 
bridge over King street on Fifth has long been recognized. 

It is expected that the Mission-street electric road will be in 
operation some time during tbe spring. There are two reasons 
for the delay in completing tbis line. The street, from Main to 
East had to be sewered and the grade raised. This has been 
accomplished. Then the work on the power-house near Thir- 
tieth street, ceased, pending the consolidation of the Market- 
street system with tbe Omnibus lines and other roads. Tbe new 
system will have one central electric plant, which will operate all 
its lines. 

Tbe Supervisors have denied the district assessment for the 
Polk street opening, and the work will be stopped. The property 
owners should have the work done by private contract. This is 
the only way oat of it, and if tbe property-owners desire to see tl a 
north end of the city in this locality improved, tbey had better 
not wait for tbe city to do the work. What an imposing bluff is 
the north end of Polk street; what a beautiful view it commands, 
and what an exclusive place it would be for handsome private 
homes! Too bad that no one ever thought of this before. 

The market during the past week has been brisk, although 
there were no sales or transfers of any prominence recorded. 

Thomas Magee has taken his sons, Wm. A. Mageeand Thomas 
Magee, Jr., into partnership with him, and hereafter the firm will 
be known as Thomas Magee & Soni. These able and popular 
young men will undoubtedly add to the strength of this old 
house. 

Considerable building is being done in the Holly Park tract. 
Lots in this vicinity, and in the vicinity of the Midwinter Fair, 
have found ready purchasers, mostly workingmen, who want to 
build small homes on easy installments. 

A change of grade has been ordered on Park Hill avenue, from 
Ridley to Haight street. The grade has been very uneven, and 
the change is made to give a regular fall from Ridley street north, 
and to allow the opening of Waller street, which was formerly too 
steep for driving. The work is now in progresr. 



YESTERDAY afternoon the management of the cyclorama of 
the Volcano of Kilauea, gave a private reception preliminary 
to tbe formal opening of this wonderfully realistic painting. 



Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, Mills Build- 
ing, 218-220 Montgomery street. Special attention given to the col- 
ection of rents. Full charge taken of property for absent owners. 



Deserving Confidence— There is uo article which so richly deserves 
the entire confidence of the community as Brown's Bronchial Troches. 
Those suffering from Asthmatic and Bronchial Diseases, Coughs, and Colde, 
should try them. Price 25 cents. 




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1TOTICE 

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Has removed his office to 514 Suiter St. Hours. 12 to 2 daily, except 
Thursdays aad Sundays. Telephone 5209. 

DR. JOHN GALLWEY 

to his new offices, 634 KEARNY Street, near Clay. 
Hours— 1:30 to 4 p. M. and 7'.30 to 9 P. M. 
Telephone 207.] I Residence, 1331 Leavenworth. 



D 



R. THOMAS L. HILL, DENTIST, 



OFFICE— ODD FELLOWS' Bl II IHMJ, 8. W. Corner Seventh and 

Market Streets. 
Office Hotjbs : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Consultation Hours : 4 to 5. 



D 



R. R. CUTLAR, DENTIST, 



Removed from Phelan Building, to 
NO. 416 GEARY STREET ----- San Francisco 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 
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D 



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135 Montgomery St., near Bush, San Francisco, Cal. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 13, 1894. 




PREDICTIONS made last autumn thai this would prove a dull 
season in San Francisco's social world have certainly not been 
verified, for, as a lady was heard to exclaim the other day, "There 
is so much going on that one really does not know how every- 
thing can be accomplished." The season has certainly proved 
more lively than several preceding winters. Teas were almost 
the exclusive rule last season, and teas continue to be given this 
winter also, but they are delightfully interspersed with dances 
and dinners, so all tast es are being suited. 

The engagement of Miss Virginia Bonynge, formerly of this 
city, to Viscount Lord Deerhurst, eldest son and heir of the Earl 
of Coventry, is announced in London. Many of our readers will 
recollect Miss Bonynge as a tall, slender blonde. At her Majesty's 
last ball at Buckingham Palace her beauty attracted much admir- 
ation. Lord Deerhurst is twenty-eight years of age, and has seen 
service at the Cape. The Coventrys are one of the best known 
families in England, and are connected with most of the leading 
families of Great Britain. By this marriage one of England's 
aristocratic coronetB passes to an American girl. Lord Coventry 
is an intimate friend of the Prince of Wales, and, it will be re- 
membered, was present at the celebrated baccarat card party 
which resulted in the banishment from society of Sir Gordon 
Cumming. Most people will recollect the attempt made to drive 
the Bony nges out of London. They were attacked and libeled 
without mercy, but they lived to laueb at their enemies. Since 
their advent in London they have enjoyed the friendship of sev- 
eral members of the royal family. Mr. Bonynge comes of an old 
family. A large part of the family estates at Ballintober County, 
Longford, were acquired by royal grant, in 1667, from Charles I., 
and the subsequent lands from the confiscated estates of the fugi- 
tive James I. Mrs. Bonynge's father was one of the slave owners 
of the Bouth. Uer great-grandfather was U. S. Senator George 
Head, one of the framers of the Declaration of Independence and 
one of the signers of the Constitution of the United States. 

Smilax and red berries prettily decorated the interior of the 
Cluff residence on Vallejo street last Monday evening, when 
Major and Mr?. William Cluff celebrated the fifteenth anniversary 
of their wedding day by giving a dancing party. The hostess, 
who was assisted by Misses Byington and Graham, looked charm- 
ing in a handsome gown of pink satin, with an overdress of 
grenadine, and at the elaborate supper served at midnight, she 
and her husband were the recipients of many toasts and good 
wishes for their future health and prosperity. There were numer- 
ous gifts, chiefly of crystal and handsome cut glass, and the wee 
sma' hours were reached before the pleasant evening came to a 
conclusion. 



The wedding of Miss Kathryn Voorhies, daughter of Dr. and 
Mrs. A. H. Voorhies, and J. Malcolm Henry, of Washington City, 
whicb took place on Monday evening last at the Voorhies resi- 
dence, on California street, auspiciously opened a very gay week, 
and was one of the " swellest" home weddings solemnized in 
society circles for many a day. Many causes combined to render 
it such. The fair bride was one of our most popular belles, the 
groom young and handsome, the Voorhies residence charming 
with evidences of wealth, luxury and refinement, and the guests 
bidden to the marriage among our most exclusive set — even the 
weather was propitious, for the dark clouds which had been over- 
hanging the earth cleared away and the bright stars twinkled bril- 
liantly. Inside the mansion all was warmth, color and festal 
decoration, with many a quaint conceit contributing to the gen- 
eral effect. For instance, the traditional wedding bell was dis- 
carded, and in its stead appeared a tiny white satin slipper, em- 
broidered in gold and holding a bunch of orange blossoms. The 
music room, on the right of the entrance hall, was chosen for the 
ceremony, and down the centre were arranged pedestals crowned 
with bouquets of flowers, to whicb v at intervals, were attached 
streamers of satin ribbon leading from the door to the bow win- 
dow, making a pathway for the bride, as in the bow window the 
ceremony took place. Here was placed a satin prie-dieu, amid 
palms, ferns and smilax. From a large wreath of the latter the 
slipper was hung. Here stood the happy groom, attended by his 
best man, Herbert Mitchell, awaiting his bride, and promptly on 
time she appeared, coming from the dining room, which adjoins 
the music-room, leaning on her father's arm and followed by her 
mother and sister. Two little children held the ends of the rib- 
bons as they approached Bishop Nichols, who stood with his 
prayer-book in hand. A murmur of admiration greeted the 
bride's appearance, for surely she never appeared to greater ad- 
vantage in any of her beautiful costumes than in her bridal robe 
of heavy duchesse satin trimmed with rare old lace, bouquet of 
lilies of the valley and orange buds, and long tulle veil. The 
nuptial knot was soon tied, and hearty congratulations were 
showered upon the young couple. Then followed a magnificent 
supper, toasting, speeches, etc., and then dancing and an inspec- 
tion of the valuable gifts, and by the time the adieus were said, 



the verdict had been pronounced that the wedding was a mag- 
nificent success. Many beautiful gowns were worn by the ladies. 
Mrs. Voorhies, the bride's mother, wore an elegant gown of pearl 
gray satin, with diamond ornaments. Miss Marie Voorhies wore 
a lovely light brocade. Mrs. Marcus Gerstle and Mrs. Dr. Burgess 
were notable for distingue gowns, and the young ladies were all 
looking their prettiest, and as there was a goodly supply of the 
season's beaux present, the girls had no lack of partners, and 
dancing was kept up until a late hour. 

Oakland society was sadly disappointed at being deprived of 
the brilliant wedding festivity it had anticipated for Wednesday 
last, but owing to the death of Captain Ainsworth all invitations 
for the marriage of Misa Daisy and Percy Morgan, which was to 
have taken place in church, were recalled, and the ceremony was 
quietly performed by Bishop Nichols at the Ainsworth home, 
Roselawn, on Wednesday evening. Those present were limited 
to the immediate relatives on both sides, and numbered less than 
two score guests. The bride wore the beautiful white satin 
wedding robe already prepared for the event, but otherwise there 
was no display of any kind and all attendants were dispensed 
with. After a tour of the State the young couple will make the 
Palace Hotel their residence. 

The wedding of Miss Ada Trezerant, daughter of the late Dr. 
Robert Barron Trezerant, of l)es Arc, and Mr. Joseph Gensoul, 
son of the late Adrian Gensoul, of this city, was solemnized very 
quietly at 8t. Dominic's Church on the 26th of December last. 
Miss Georgia Sullivan was the maid-of-honor. Mr. Gensoul's 
best man was Mr. Eugene Bresse. Mr. and Mrs. Gensoul are now 
residing at the home of Mr. Gensoul's sister, Mrs. Thomas 
Fisher, 899 Fulton street. 

Miss Daisy E. Willard, a charming and accomplished young 
lady of this city, has been visiting for some time at Chicago, 
whence comes news of her engagement to Dr. Frank G. Mason, 
a rising young physician of that city. Miss Willard is to return 
to San Francisco in March, and the wedding will likely follow in 
June, when Dr. Mason will come to California for the purpose of 
marrying and bearing away one of our choicest treasures. 

The event in society across the bay the coming week will be 
the wedding on Monday evening of Miss Mamie Phillips to Mr. 
Easton, of New Haven. All the fashionables have been invited, 
and the affair is to be very swell indeed. 



On Monday there were three teas and two luncheons. On 
Tuesday Miss Hager gave a second luncheon, at which were 
present a majority of this season's "buds" and several young 
matrons, and which was equally as elaborate and enjoyable to 
her guests as was her luncheon of last week; Mrs. J. K. K. 
Nuttall was the hostess of another luncheon to a party of twelve 
ladies; Mrs. Maynardier gave a Kaffe K latch at the Occidental 
Hotel; Mrs. Monroe Salisbury held the first of her series or recep- 
tions; there was a progressive euchre party at Mrs. A. R. Wells's 
on Van Ness avenue in the evening; the Club of '94 gave a ball 
at Saratoga Hall; and the second dance of the season took place 
at the Hotel Rafael. Wednesday was given up chiefly to dinners 
and two theatre parties at the Baldwin, followed by supper. On 
Thursday Mrs. W. D. Forbes gave a tea; the Club of '93 was en- 
tertained at a dancing party at Miss Maude Smith's, on Jackson 
street, and the wedding of Miss Minnie Cole and Eugene Bresse 
was solemnized. Yesterday Mr. and Mrs. Charles Detrick, nee 
Bowie, held the first of their receptions since their return 
from the East, where they spent the honeymoon. Mrs. R. D. 
Fry held the first of her January receptions; and the ball at the 
Holbrook's, ou Van Ness avenue, took place last night. To-day 
there will be a tea at Mrs. Henry L. Dodge's in honor of her 
niece, Mrs. Bailey, at which the hours will be from 4 till 7 
o'clock; one at Mrs. Alexander Burnett's, on Franklin street, 
also from 4 till 7, and one at Mrs. N. Frank Whittier's, on Jack- 
son street. 



The first of a series of four concerts to be given by Nathan 
Landsberger, the well-known violinist, and Samuel G. Fleishman, 
the talented pianist, will take place at Golden Gate Hall next 
Wednesday evening. There are not two more popular young 
artists in San Francisco, and their subscription list has been very 
gratifying. The programme will embrace Chopin's Polonaise, op. 
53, by Mr. Fleishman; Mr. Landsberger will play Wieniawski's 
Polonaise in D major; Mrs. Sedgeley-Reynolds will sing, and for 
the first time a quartette by Albert Becker will he given, and 
Louis Heine and B. Jaulus wiil be the assisting performers. Seats 
are now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co's. 

There was a pretty performance given by young folks at the 
Bella Vista on Wednesday last, for the benefit of several kinder- 
gartens, which was a very successful affair. The cosy little 
theatre was crowded, and the programme was well carried out. 
This consisted of vocal selections and recitations, and the one-act 
comedy of Love by Induction, in which the young Misses who 
personated the characters received much well merited applause. 



The Wiikie Palace Ballad concerts will be resumed toward the 
end of the current month. They will be given in the Maple Hall 
of the Palace Hotel, but the exact date has not been fixed upon. 



Jan. 13, 1894. 



BAH nUNGODBOO NEWS LITTER 



l-Ml *Mk doted with • t*r •■* of cftilronomfc diipltyi. for 
■ urely the handsome lunch R.vcn by Mitt Htger is entitle. i to t • 
ranked as such, and iiuong h*r gQWtl mtrt many of the yourg 
matrons of the swim, Un •*> I'ayne's proaressire larch 

was the feature of Kriday after noon, her guests arriving between 
the boars of one and three o'clock, and were entertained in re- 
lays. Mr. Wllberforces tea on Saturday was the final effort of 
the week, and if any doubt was felt about its proving a success, 
it has been effectively set at real Mrs. Louts I'arrott made a very 
charming matron, and the pretty Moral decorations of the rooms, 
the temptingly set tea-table, with the delicious menu placed upon 
it, and the muMC provided, each and all came in for a word of 
praise from the large number of cuesta who responded to the in- 
vitation. Several parties crossed the bay on Saturday to attend 
the tea given by Mrs. Coleman and Miss Jessie in Oakland that 
afternoon. 



One of the most pleasant receptions of the past week was 
given by Mr. and Mrs. Francisco de Ojeda, in their new home, 
alifornia street, on Wednesday evening. Mrs. de Ojeda is 
a charming hostess and provided several surprises for her guests, 
which were greatly enjoyed. The decorations were very pretty. 
At midnight an elaborate supper was served. Mr. and Mrs. de 
Ojeda's guests were: Mr. and Mrs. M. Walleck, Dr. and Mrs. 
Lowe, of London; Mr. and Mrs. L. Mooser, Dr. and Mrs. Edoardo 
Matconado, Mrs. E. Ratye, Mrs. A. Gros, Miss Camille Gross, 
Miss Clotilde Acosta, Miss Julia Talbot, Miss Maude Rotbermel, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Darand, Mrs. Luis de Ojeda. Miss Marie 
Iturand, Miss Tessie Habn, Miss A. Uahn, Miss Teliie Baker, 
Mrs. Pacheco, Misses Pacbeco. Dr. J. Franklin Brown, T. A. 
Hays. P. Duvergez. I. da Costa Duarte, Consul for Portugal; Jose 
Acosta, Alfonso Barillas, W. B. Waldron, R. G. Mackay an.i 
Edouard Doubedat. 

The friends and admirers of the Young Lady's Orchestra will, 
no doubt, be pleased to hear that tbey will soon have the pleasure 
of bearing them once more in public. It has been the custom of 
these young ladiep, since their organization, to give a concert 
during the winter for some charitable purpose, so this year they 
have chosen the Children's Hospital and the Pioneer Kinder- 
garten as the beneficiaries. The place will be the Grand Opera 
House, and the time Tuesday evening, the 6th of February, 
which will be society's last chance of seeing the old house as it is 
now, for the next day it will pass into the bands of the new 
lessee, who will remodel it. There is every assurance that the 
attendance will be large and fashionable, and the affair a memor- 
able one. 



The first meeting of The Fortnightly went off with great snap 
at the Rathbone's on Wednesday evening. The house is very 
spacious and is beautifully planned for entertaining, in which 
happy art the host and hostess are proficient. 8ix acts were 
given, and all who took part covered themselves with laurels. 
The operetta at the end, with Miss Goad, Mrs. Richards and 
Donald Campbell in the cast, was particularly applauded: The 
next will take place in a fortnight at Lloyd Tevis's house. 



Frederick I. Monsen, who recently gave a sterioptican lecture 
on Salton, will give another on the 8th proximo before the Haw- 
thorne Society, at Metroplitan Halt, the subject being " Death 
Valley." Mr. Monsen spent several weeks in that strangest and 
most grewsome corner of California, and took an elaborate series 
of photographs, which he has made into slides for the coming lec- 
ture; 

Mrs. Oelrichs' friends are quite elated over the prospect of a 
visit from her and Miss Birdie next month, and the probabilities 
are that 8an Francisco will have the pleasure of welcoming her 
before February has much more than entered. One of our losses 
is Mrs. Fred Sharon, whose health has necessitated her departure 
Eastward several weeks earlier than she anticipatad going, and a 
visit to Europe is on the cards for the immediate future, to con- 
sult physicians abroad. Miss Lena Blanding was one of the 
Sharon party Eastward. 

The many friends of Col. and Mrs. 8medberg were greatly dis- 
tressed to bear of the serious illness of their daughter, Mrs. 
Mclvor, which, about Christmas time, called Mrs. Smedberg to 
her side. Mrs, Mclvor has, however, somewhat improved since 
then, at least sufficiently to take the journey home, and, accom- 
panied by Mrs. Smedberg, she yesterday arrived in San Fran- 
cisco, where, it is hoped, her complete recovery will be only a 
question of a short time. 

The progressive euchre party given by Misses Charlotte and 
Nellie Dore, was one of the pleasant entertainments of Friday 
evening of last week, supper and dancing following the distribu- 
tion of the prizes won by the players. 

The Entertainment Chapter of the Church of the Advent will 
tender a reception to the new rector of the Parish, the Rev. 
Henry B. Colier, at the Fairmount, on Thursday evening, Janu- 
ary 18th. 

The doctors recommend, for indigestion, after dinner chewing for 
half an hour Adams' Tutti Frutti Pepsin Chewing Gum. 



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Chief among the entertainments of next week are the Irving 
Bcott dinner dance on .Monday evening, the Artillery ball at the 
Presidio on Tuesday evening, the Perrin-Robinson wedding, at 
Grace Church, on Wednesday evening, and the cotillion at Odd 
Fellows Hall on Friday evening. On Friday night, also, the 
Camera Club will give another illustrated lecture at Metropolitan 
Hall, when Professor Steele will pleasantly tell what he knows 
about •■ Westminster and its FamoUB Abbey," and on Saturday 
evening the Progress Club will give the operetta of The Oracle at 
Golden Gate Hall, which promises to be well rendered. The 
postponed meeting of the Huntington Euchre Club will occur next 
Tuesday in Mrs. Alfred Moore's rooms, at the Berkshire. 

Mrs. William F. Taafe is now convalescent, after the recent 
severe illness, which has confined her to her residence in this 
city for some weeks past. 



SANBORN, VAIL & CO. have always carried blank books and 
other office supplies as a regular part of their very extensive 
stock, but they have now made a separate department of these 
goods and placed it under the charge of a specialist. The stock 
has been made larger and more comprehensive, embracing fine 
ledgers and all other first-class goods required by offices. 



THE prize masquerade ball of the Verein Eintracht takes place 
this evening in the Mechanics' Pavilion. There will be a 
concert and a grand march, followed by the usual dancing and 
merry making. Handsome prizes will be awarded to the best 
characters. 




The oysters you buy at Moraghan's stall, in the California Market 
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Sold by Grocers everywhere. 

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24 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jan. 13,1894. 




VI6QR of MEN 

Easily, Quickly, Permanently Restored. 

Weakness, Nervousness, 
Debility, and all the train 
, of evila from early errors or 
later excesses, the results of 
overwork, sickness, worry, 
etc. Fullstrength, devel- 
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a every organ and portion, 
of the body. Simple, nat- 
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. ,.Jate improvement Been. 
Failure impossible. 2,000 references. Book, 
explanation and proofs mailed (sealed) free. 

ERIE MEDICAL CO., B uffalo, N.Y. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

Leave | From Jan.. 7, 1894. I Absive 

7:00 a Atlantic Express. Ogdea and East 6:45a 

7:00 a Benicia, Vacaville, $Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento and Redding via Davie.. 7:15p 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Napa, Calls- 
toga and *Sauta Rosa 6 :15 p 

8:30 A Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, M rysville,*Oroville, 
and Red Bluff . 4:15 p 

9:00 a New Orleans Express, Santa Bar- 
bara, Los Angeles, Demiug, El 

Paso, New Orleans and East 8:45 P 

*9:00 a Stockton and Milton .*8:45p 

tl0;00 a Haywards, Niles and San Jose... t6:15p 
*12:00 m Haywards, Niles and San Jose .. *6:15 P 
*1:00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00 p 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano, and 
Santa Rosa 9:15 a. 

4:00 p. Benicia, Vacaville, Esparto, 
§$Rnmsey, Woodland, Kuight's 
Landing, Marysville, Oroville 
and Sacramento 10:45a 

4:30p. Niles, Livermore and San Jo*e. 8:45 a 

5.00 p. Martinez. Stockton, Modesto, Mer- 
ced and Fresno 10:45a 

5:00p. Lob Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara and 
Los Angeles 10:15a. 

5 :00 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojaveand East 10:45 a. 

6 :00 p European Mail, Ogden and East . . 9 .45a 

6;00p. Haywards, Niles and SanJose.. 7:45a. 

J7:00 P. Vallejo f8:45 P. 

7:00 p. Oregon ExDress. Sacramento, 
Marysville, bedding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and East. _^ __. 10 4 _l 

SantaCruz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

8:1&a. Newark. Ceutervllle, San Jose, 
Feltou, Boulder Creek, Santa 
Cruz and way stations 6:20 p. 

*2:15 p Newark, Oeuterville, San Jose, New 
Almaden, Felion, Boulder Creek. 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 

stations *11:50a 

4:15 p. Newark. SanJoRe, Los Gatos. 9:50a. 

+11:15 p. Hunters' Train for Newark, Al- 
viso, fan Jose, Los Gatos and way 

stations \ 7:20p 

Coast Division f Third a "1 TowHsend Streefs )~ 

6 45 a. San Jose, New Almaden and Way 

Stations 2:45 p. 

8:15 a. San Jose, TresPinos. Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove. Paso Robles, San 
San Luis Obispo and principal 

Way Stations ^26° 

]0:40a. San Jose, and Way Stations. .. 5.0Sp 

12:25 p. Palo Alto nnd Wav Stations . 4:15 p. 
•2 20p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Piuos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

PaciflcGrove .no :40 a. 

*3:30 p. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions *9:-17 a. 

*4:25p. Palo Alto and Way Stations *8:06a. 

5 -.10 p. San Jose and Way Stations 8:48a. 

6:30p. Palo Alto and Way Stations 6:35a. 

fll:45p. Palo Alto and principal Way 
Stations... +7 :26 p. 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From SIS FRAMSCQ— Foot of Market St. (Slip 8)— 
*7 00 *8 00 9 0T *10 00 and 11 00 A. M., *12 30 
11 CO *2 00 3 00 *4 00 5 00 and *o 00 P. M. 

From 0\KUXn— Foot of Broadway. 

*6 00 *7 00 8 00 *9 00 10 00 and ni 00 A. M. 
112 00 *12 30 2 00 *3 00 4 00 and *5 00 p. M . 

A. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. fSaturdays only. 

ISundaysonly. 
$ Monday, Wednesday and Friday only. 
aa j Going— Saturday and Sunday only. 
vy f Returning— Sunday and Monday only. 

The PACIFIC TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other information. 



GOOD-BY .—Boston Traveler. 

We say it for an hour or for years; 
We say it smiling, say it choked with tears; 
We say it coldly, say it with a kiss. 
And yet we have no other word than this: 
Good-by. 

We have no dearer word for our heart's 

friend. 
For him who journeys to the world's far 

end 
And scars our soul with going ; thus we say, 
As unto him who steps but o'er the way: 
Good-by. 

Alike to those we love and those we hate, 
We say no more in parting. At life's gate, 
To him who passes out beyond earth's sight, 
We cry, as to the wanderer for a night: 
Good-by. 



FAIR VI81TOR (who has been looking 
at monsieur's picture of a ihunder 
storm) — But I am surprised that you have 
not sold it long ago, Monsieur Palette. It 
is the best thing id your studio. M. 
Palette — Ah, madame, zat ees it. He ees 
too good. Four people have bought him 
and all bring him back. Vat yon zink ? 
Ev'ryvare he go, Mon Dieu! ze milk be all 
turn sour. — B. A" & Co 's Monthly. 

Wootibin's Facial Soap 

For the Sbln, Scalp and Com- 
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I years' practical experience In 
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^Sample S'ze Cake and 150 
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tcalrj. Nervous mi'l Blood DIs- 
cves.Bir.h Marks, Moles Warts, 
Pimples, Freckles, superfluous 
y ^-iam -- Kni' - p'i'1 n I Ptl1 ' 'polishes. 

JOHN H, WOODBURY, Dermatologist, 
125 VV. tend si.N.Y. Co.bUltailOufree. 

tn W? per day, at 

b\J UJIC/ home, selling 

LIDHTNING PLATER 

i J plating jewelrv, watches 

.tileware, ic. Plattra the 

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!W, on all kinds at metal 

rh gold, silver or nickel. 

> experience. No capital, 

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_ iiisplarlng. Wholesale lo 

a S> ff aceuis$5. Wriieforclrcu- 

"^lars. H. E. DEL NO & 

Co., t'olumbuK, O. 





?rOENri 



IK* CAVtAI 0, 1 ilMUt MARKS ^mW 
V COPYRIGHTS.^ 

CAIV I OBTAIN A PATENT? Fop a 

Srompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
IUNN tfc CO., who have bad nearly fifty years' 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A Handbook of In- 
formation concerning Parents and how to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue of median* 
leal and scientific books sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the Scientific American, and 
thus are brought widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by far the 
largest circulation of any scientific work In the 
world. S3 a year. Sample copies sent free. 

Building Edition, monthly, $2.50 a year. Single 
copies, iJ.j cents. Every number contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to show the 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 
MUNN & CO., New YoitK, 361 Bhqadway . 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S$. CD. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN 
NAN STREETS, at 3: 00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with 8teamersfor SHANGHAI: 

Gaelic Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1894 

Belgic Thursday, Feb. 8, 1894 

Oceanic (via Honolulu) .. Tuesday, Feb 27,1894 

Gaelic Tuesday, March 20, 1894 

ROUND TRIP TIOKET8 AT REDUCED RATES 
Oabin Plans on exhibition and Passage 
i Iriets for sale at 8. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
8t<"°* 1, s. ^b" Francisco. 

For freight apply at offices of Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company, at wharf, or at No. 202 
Front street, San Francisco. 

T. .«.. GOODMAN, Gen.PasB.Agt. 



! For. 

1 Women Only. 3 

* In morning sickness it is a specific $ 

* that gives instant relief and tones ^ 
9 the stomach tor other foods. f i 



\\\\\\miM 



CLAM 



Minimi; 



£S ^. 



• Nothing is more delicious and ac- ♦ 

• ceptable to a weak stomach. It will © 
P soothe and quiet the nerves as noth- ^ 
+ ing else will. It supplies the place of ♦ 

• tea, coffee or cocoa at breakfast. © 
m Never buy Clam Bouillon for the m 
+ sick, except in Glass Bottles. ^ 
m Grocers and Druggists. ri 
^ Six ^£ pint bottles expressed for $1.50. Send a 
a stamps for book, " Household Hints." «, 
^ E. S. Burnham Co., i2oGanesvoortSt., N.Y. X 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 

America. 

SAILINGS— At noon. 

S. S. "Colon," January 18, 1994. 

S. S. "San Juan," January 29, 1894. 

S. S. " San Bias," February 8, 1894. 

S. S. "Colima," February 19, 1894. 

Note.— When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA 

AND HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc.: 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

8. 8. "City of reking," Thursday, January 

18, 1894. at 3 P. M. 

8 S. "China," via Honolulu, Tuesday, January 
30, 1894, at 3 P. m. 

S S. * Peru," Saturday, February 17, 1894, at 
3 p. M. 

S.S. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Thursday, March 
S, 1894, at 3 p. M. 
Round Trie Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight "or passage apply at the office, cor- 
ner First and. Brannan streets. Branch office— 
202 Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 
General Agent 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a. m.. Jan. 10,2^; Feb. 9, 24; 
March 11, 26; April and May, 10, 25. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
Jan. 5th, and every 5th day thereafter. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Newport, Los Aneeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
8anta Barbara, Port Los Angeles, (Santa Monica,) 
Redondo, (Los Angeles), and Newport, every 
fourth and fifth day, at 11 a. m. 

For ports in Mexico, 25th of each month. 

Tickbt Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOOrALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

< U bv n The SP 1 ™*'"! 8.000 

^v*^J — iff, ^ ton steamers of the 

fr ' 

"Iff I IF^tf \0 NEY as under: 

For HONOLULU, 




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^ sail for HONOLULU, 

CL AUCKLAND and SYD- 



APIA. AUCKLAND 
and SYDNEY, S. S. 
"MARIPOSA," Jan. 
11th, 2 P. M. 
For HONOLULU, 
8. 8. - AUSTRALIA," 

Jan. 20, 1894 
Forpassageand freight 
apply to 
J. 5. SPBECKELS& BROS. CO., 827 Market St. 



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g*N TRANCi^ 



News^JIett 



(8>VLlif#xv&^Mbzxtxse\\ 




Vol. XIV III 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1894. 



Number 3. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred 
Marriott. 606-609-613 itcrchnnt Street. San Francisco. En- 
tered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 



The office of Me News Letter in New York Oity is at Oit " Evening 
Post " Building, 204 206 Broadway, Room 1. where information 
may be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 



Communications intended for publication should be in the hands of the 
editor by noon of Thursday. 



w 



HEN the opportunity of a man's life presents itself, he 
usually waits for an introduction. 



A CHICAGO husband recently parted with seventy-two square 
inches of his cuticle, which was grafted on his wife's body. 
That man is a hero, and hasn't been equalled since Adam gave a 
rib to accommodate Eve. 



w 



HAT ! Times are dull? and money tight? 

Not so, ye malcontents and brawlers; 
When one small town, to see a fight, 

Pays twenty thousand dollars! 



GOVERNOR LEWELLING, of Kansas, finding it impossible to 
unseat Mrs. Lease, has come to San Francisco to cool off. It 
seems unnecessary to say that the Governor will be dined and 
banqueted during bis visit here, aDd we may often hear him 
respond to the toast, "Woman — God bless herl' 1 



WHILE it is well enough to have 2500 men beautifying Golden 
Gate Park, it would appear to be a sensible idea to have a 
few employed to clean up and repair the streets of the city. No 
such opportunity for having this greatly needed work done so 
cheaply, and no more urgent occasion for its performance, are 
likely to occur again. 



THE arrest of John C. Dodge, of Chicago, on a charge of having 
secured a pension by false swearing, is an attack on the pen- 
sion system that should not be permitted to pass without a vigor- 
ous protest. If the G. A. R. men do not at once adopt a ringing 
resolution denunciatory of this high-banded proceeding on the 
part of the Administration, they will be derelict in their duty to 
an oppressed comrade. 

IT may not be unworthy of notice that it is the women, not the 
men, who go into ecstasies over the muscular Sandow, as he 
exbibits himself in flesh-colored tights; and that it is the men, 
not the women, who rave over the graceful curves of Bella Baya, 
as she bellys it in the danse du ventre. But whether this fact leads 
logically to a moral, or simply to a plain, every-day immoral, it 
would perplex the average Jin de siecle philosopher to determine. 



THE term of office of Charles Sonntag as State Prison Director 
having expired, this gentleman retires from office with a 
record which must be as gratifying to him as it is to bis friends. 
Mr. Sonntag had acquired so intimate a knowledge of penology, 
both in its theoretical and its practical aspects, and by the force 
of his superior understanding bad accomplished so many desirable 
reforms in prison management, that his retirement is a matter 
for general regret. 

THE managers of the cable lines may not be to blame for the 
occasional stoppages of their cars (although it is darkly 
hinted by some who claim to be in position to know, that tbe 
old cables are not always replaced by new ones as soon as they 
should be), but they are seriously at fault for not providing con- 
ductors with lay-over checks or tickets, good on any car line in 
the city, to be used in such an emergency. Under the present 
arrangement, or rather in the absence of any arrangement of the 
kind mentioned, passengers must sit in tbe cars and wait or miss 
luncheon, dinner, bed-time or an important appointment, or for- 
feit their fare and walk home — in many instances miles away — 
or pay another fare on some other line. In addition to the an- 
noyance caused by such delays, many passengers, especially 
tired women, have not brought sufficient money with them to 
pay a second fare. 



A BATCH of San Francisco's representaiive ministers of the 
gospel gravely listening to sermons on evolution by Professor 
Joe I.eConte and President Jordan, Is a spectacle that strikes the 
orthodox layman dumb with amazement and indignation. It 
looks very much as if tbe progressive clergy, to be consistent, 
would soon be compelled to throw away their Bibles and base 
their discourses on texts from Huxley, Darwin or Spenser. It is 
almost enough to make a man who bas hitherto been guided by 
faith alone, regret that he ever joined the church. 



THE first of the congresses which will be a feature of the Mid- 
winter Fair will be a unique affair— a debate on the proposi- 
tion, "Resolved, that the Hawaiian Islands should be annexed to 
the United States." The supporters of tbe affirmative will be W. 
H. Jb. Barnes and Irving M. Scott, and of the negative the Rev. 
Jacob Voorsanger and John P. Irish. With this array of brains 
and eloquence tbe affair is sure to be exceedingly interesting. 
Three judges, selected from tbe Supreme, tbe Circuit and the 
Superior Courts, will serve as judges of tbe debate. Tickets are 
on sale at Sherman & Clay's, and are $1 each. 



THE determination by the State Prison Directors to confine 
every cod victed footpad in a solitary dungeon is certainly 
commendable; and if the police, by some fortuitous combination 
of propitious circumstances, should happen to catch a footpad 
asleep; and should a Judge, contrary to the spirit of the law and 
in defiance of all precedent, promptly convict bim ; and should it 
turn out that in all San Francisco there could not be found a 
single lawyer who for a portion of the " swag " would guarantee 

a successful appeal, a rehearing and finally an acquittal then 

the PrisoD Directors' experiment will be watched with the keen- 
est interest by a curious and expectant public. 



MRS. ELLA WHEELER WILCOX, who, like Ward McAllister 
and John L. Sullivan, is a member of the staff of the New 
York World, is writing a series of essays for that paper. The 
latest is entitled " What Love Is." Mrs. Wilcox says it is the 
essence of every existing thing. We respectfully beg to ask her 
if it is the essence of Limburger cheese or fried onions. If there 
had only been lamb fritters on this earth would there have been 
love? And Mrs. Wilcox goes on and says: " Love is an ecstacy 
and an agony." This is unnecessary. A man can love his 
mother or his aunt without suffering internal pain. Some one 
should call the attention of Mr. Ella Wheeler Wilcox to these 
things. 



TO be clean shaved around the chin is regarded, in America, as 
the mark of a careful man, whilst in Turkey a mau cuts off 
his beard when he has suffered some kind of public degradation. 
Similarly, in Turkey, it is a disgrace for a woman to show her 
bead and face, wbi.st in the New World the exposure of the legs 
is considered inappropriate. Things go by contraries in Tutkey 
and America; Turkey is our favorite disb, whilst America is un- 
palatable to the Turk. The Turk uses a scimitar or some kind of 
a crooked sword, the American prefers a derringer. A bow-string 
ends a Mohammedan's life, a beau-string here commences a 
young lady's existence. The only affinity for Turkey in this 
country is in the church line; they have big mosques, and we 
have mosquitoes. 



THE more we read over ancient history, the more we deplore 
the condition of the present. In other days some men were 
great. In our days, man's littleness is our only theme. Now a 
man can never be great until be bas stolen enough from his 
fellow man to make him rich. Then, and then only, is he great. 
In tbe days of yore men grew great from the subordination of 
the love of gain to the love of right. Now men trample on 
right, and proudly show the soles of their stained feet as they 
mount the ladder of fortune. "Money" is now the cry — how 
got, it matters not; as long as it is there the possessor of it is 
worshipped. Never did sacred history dispel fiction more ruth- 
lessly, or point ont a truer moral, than when it drew the telling 
picture of the one error of Aaron's life, in erecting that golden 
calf. The worship of that calf, despite all the warning of the 
ages, is now carried on to a greater extent than Aaron ever dared 
to contemplate when he ran that little opposition show to the 
Almighty. 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 20, 1894 : 



MARZHAM'S REMARKABLE ACTION. 



GOVERNOR MARKHAM has employed Messrs. Estee and Mil- 
ler, on behalf of the State, to recover the property of the late 
Thomas H. Blythe, on the ground that he left no will, no next of 
kin and no heirs, and, therefore, that the property has escheated. 
This format and official action by the Executive has excited sur- 
prise in some quarters, and has been discussed, but without 
much point, in the daily papers, which have manifested for years 
an extraordinary partizansbip for the plaintiff in the action of 
Florence Blythe Hinckley, formerly Florence Blythe, against 
Abbu Ayres and others, generally known as the Blythe case. If 
Blythe left no will, no child, adopted or instituted as an heir, no 
next of kin, no widow, and no collateral heirs, then, undoubt- 
edly, his property would escheat. But the Blythe case has 
been pending for years and has developed an unusual number of 
claimants, whose pretentions, with one exception, have not so 
far been foreclosed. True, Judge Coffey decided that Florence 
Blythe was an illegitimate daughter of Blythe's, who had been 
adopted, and was, therefore, entitled to the entire estate, as he 
also held that Mrs. Alice Edith Blythe was not the widow. He 
further adjudged that, if Florence Blythe was not entitled, then 
the Williams' claimants were true and the nearest collaterals. 
Judgment was accordingly rendered in the Superior Court. Nu- 
merous appeals from this judgment were taken, and only one of 
them has been so far heard and decided. The Williams claimants 
appealed, and, for the purposes of their case, which affected no 
other parties, conceded the paternity of Florence and that Mrs. 
Blythe was not the widow, and staked their success upon two 
propositions: First — That Florence had not and could not have 
been adopted, because of the foreign domicile of herself and of her 
mother, and, second, that she had not been instituted as an heir, 
under Section 1387 of the Civil Code. Mrs. Blythe had always 
repudiated any connection with these legal questions, and had 
limited herself to a denial that Blythe was tho father of Florence, 
and this only after James Crisp Perry bad arrived in California, 
and his deposition had been taken, which, for the first time, re- 
vealed his own illegitimacy, the character and surroundings of 
his family, and the unprecedented conditions under which the 
claim on behalf of Florence had been developed. Having no legal 
connection with the appeal of the Williams claimants, Mrs. 
Blythe practically and in open court, insisted that her rights 
could be in no way affected by a record, to which she was not a 
party, which bad been made up by the plaintiff and defendants 
equally hostile to her, and which did not present the facts. 
While the decision of the Supreme Court; against the Williams 
claimants did not and could not legally affect Mrs. Blythe or any 
of the other defendants who had separately moved for new trials, 
and appealed from the judgment, it was, nevertheless, so unique 
that it has already caused, and must hereafter cause, still more 
discriminating comment throughout the Bench and Bar, and even 
among the general public of the United States. In order to point 
the existing condition of the case and the true significance 
of Governor Markham's action, it is proper to refer to that de- 
cision. In the trial before Judge Coffey, the plaintiff had strug- 
gled for weeks to introduce in evidence an adoption paper, said 
to have been found by L. H. Varney between the leaves of a book 
in one of the rooms constituting Blythe's office. W. H. H. Hart, 
the present Attorney-General, and the proper officer to commence 
escheat proceedings, if he were not disqualified both by his posi- 
tion as an attorney for ibe plaintiff and bis contingent interest in 
the result of the litigation, offered himself as a witness to the so- 
called adoption paper; but his testimony was excluded by Judge 
Coffey, who held that he could not divulge information which he 
had received through his professional relations with Blythe. The 
adoption paper itself was ruled out, as Judge Coffey said, because 
the testimony received in its support, not that excluded, was 
too great a tax upon his credulity. Thus all hope of proving 
adoption or institution by a formal document was extinguished, 
and adoption had to rest on the correspondence and declarations 
of Blythe in bis life-time, and it is worth remembering that 
Blythe had never seen his alleged daughter, or bad any informa- 
tion of her existence not originally, derived from Julia Ashcroft, 
the mother, with whom be undoubtedly bad had illicit relations 
upon a few occasions in 1873, prior to his return to California. 
That he had been led to believe that he was the father, although 
his six years' intimacy with Mrs. Blythe was unproductive in 
this respect, is beyond reasonable question. 

The resources of the plaintiff were not exhausted by the exclu- 
sion of the adoption paper. Blythe had written many ordinary 
letters, four of which mentioned his paternity. Section 1387 rf 
the Civil Code provided that '• Every illegitimate child is an heir 
of the person who, in writing, signed in the presence of a 
competent witness, acknowledges himself to be the father of 
such child." General Hart was recalled as a witness and 
testified that he had been present, in Thomas Blythe's office, 
upon other business, upon four different occasions, when Blythe 
was writing to or about Florence, and that, upon each occasion, 
Blythe had signed the letter in his (General Hart's) presence. It 
was thus contended that Blythe bad four times acknowledged 
himself to be the father "before a competent witness," who was 
not, however, present in the character of a witness. The letters 



themselves were familiar and general, such as any man would 
write in unguarded correspondence, but it was claimed that they 
tilled the measure of Section 1387 and, in act of themselves, insti- 
tuted Florence as the sole heir. Judge Coffey found the facts, 
but held them legally insufficient nnder the section quoted. 

In the Soprerae Court, in the appeal of the Williams claimants, 
but three Justices united in favor of adoption, and three were 
not enough in bank to decide the case. The only point upon 
which judgment of affirmance was rendered was that the four 
letters acknowledged Florence and made her Blythe's heir. Chief 
Justice Beatty had been involuntarily disqualified by the act of 
Attorney-General Hart, and Associate Justice Harrison had been 
an attorney in the case, and, for that reason, could not sit. The 
Justices concurring on the one point, which secured the affirm- 
ance of the judgment, as to the Williams claimants only, upon a 
ground rejected by Judge Coffey, were Garoutte, Paterson, De 
Haven, Sharpstein and McFarland. Judge Sharpstein has since 
died, and his place is now occupied by Associate Justice Fitz- 
gerald, a former partner of M. M. Es tee's. Associate Justice 
McFarland's concurring opinion was by no means free from hesi- 
tancy even upon the one point on which he united in the judg- 
ment. 

This affirmance, however, though seriously doubted as to its 
law, had no legal effect upon the other appeals, and no effect 
whatever upon the case of Mrs. Blythe, who had no concern with 
the much controverted issues of adoption or institution. She re- 
lied upon her own claim as widow, and, as to the other half of 
the property, upon her denial of the paternity of Florence. She 
had an appeal from the judgment which, as to her, is of no mater- 
ial consequence, because ber position requires an examination of 
the whole evidence, and that could only be brought before the 
Supreme Court by her statement, which embraces two thousand 
type-written pages, and by an appeal from an order of Judge 
Coffey's, refusing her a new trial. That order was not made till 
December last, and she has three weeks or thereabouts within 
which to take her appeal and -forty days more within which to 
present her transcript. When this is done, and not before, the 
entire record, for the alleged daughter and for the alleged widow, 
for the first time will be before the Supreme Court. 

Every other appeal, except that of Mrs. Blythe, both from the 
judgment and from orders refusing new trials, has been perfected, 
and some of these appeals involve the facts as to paternity. 
Although the briefs have not been completed, all of them have 
been grouped together on the calendar for Monday next, and, 
while Mr. Justice Hanin and the Chief Justice are disqualified, 
and Mr. Justice Fitzgerald is temporarily incapacitated by ill- 
ness, have been ordered to be argued before the four remaining 
Justices. The case of Mrs. Blythe alone stands for the future. 

The true significance, then, of the official course pursued by 
Governor Markham seems to be that he is satisfied that, upon 
the evidence, the judgment of Judge Coffey in favor of Florence 
cannot be sustained, and that the State should be ready to assert 
its rights. Perhaps, also, he may have an impression, derived 
from his legal advisers, that even the affirmance in the case of the 
Williams claimants on the one point in which five Justices con- 
curred, may not be sustained against the other defendants and 
claimants, now before the Court, upon further argument and de- 
liberaton. 

It is a very pretty quarrel, as it stands, that exists in the 
courts, which show so many combinations, so much transpar- 
ent stra'egy, and surrounded by so many outside influences, 
which war among themselves, while it is to be presumed none of 
them reaches even the ears of the most august tribunal in the 
State. A decision upon the present appeals, it is confidently 
stated, will not be final. Mrs. Blytfie's appeal is yet to be met. 
And, after that, other and far-reaching proceedings in the State 
and Federal Courts are contemplated. Governor Markbam may 
be premature, but be may be right. At any rate, the Public Ad- 
ministrator, in all probability, will not veryspeedily lose his hold 
upon the magnificent estate, which Mr. Blythe so providently 
accumulated, and the woman with whom he lived for six years, 
and in whose arms he died, may live to see her own rights vindi- 
cated or the property escheated to the State in which she was 
born and her life has been spent. 



JOHN M. FLANNAGAN, a temperance lecturer from Boston, 
was found drunk in a Louisville, Kentucky, gutter on Monday 
last. There is so much whisky floatiug around iu the Louisville 
atmosphere, that probably poor Mr. Flannagan inhaled it uncon- 
sciously, and suffered in consequence. Men who preach the 
doctrine advocated by Flannagan would be more apt to corral 
converts in Cork than in Louisville. It requires a well seasoned 
soldier to attack a citadel of whisky like Louisville with any hope 
of success. 



A DUEL in Germany, Monday, resulted in the death of one of 
the principals. While there is every reason to believe that 
the fatal wound was inflicted accidentally by his opponent, yet 
the deplorable incident has startled all Europe, and has cast into 
deepest gloom the lovers of that hitherto harmless and healthful 
amusement, the duello. 



Jan 20, 1894. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



FACTS TO MAKE A NOTE OF. 

TH V. partisan organs of tbe day navel weary o( making a period 
of distrust and depression w-T'e than ft otherwise would be 
by declaring tbat manufactures are at a standstill and the coun- 
try going to Ibe demnition t baoauae of tariff uncer- 
tainty. No doubt uncertainty is a had element to import into 
business, and should be avoided as much as possible, hut if the 
argument based thereupon were to prevail, there never could be 
tanlT reform or changes, no matter what the needs of the country. 
It Is singular, iu this connection, that it Is the special friends of 
the people who are supposed to be suffering most from the uncer- 
tainty who are now prolonging it. The tariff debate continues 
in the House, and the threat is made thai when the bill reaches 
the Senate a vote will not be reached for several months. That 
the Wilson bill will finally go through is as certain as is the fact 
tbat a majority in both Houses stand ready to pass it. Here we 
are, six months after the special session began, and fifteen months 
after the country has decreed in favor of free raw material with 
which to cheapen production, without anything being done! 
Well may enemies of representative institutions argue that great 
talking assemblies of men are incapable of legislating for a nation 
of many and conflicting interests. But the manufacturers are not, 
as tbey say tbey are, suffering by reason of the delay. If they 
were, their friends would end it in short order. The occasion is 
being made to serve as an excuse for cutting wages, and for there- 
by arraying working men against taritf reform. It is as false as 
any allegation can be that the manufacturers are suffering to any 
appreciable extent, unless, indeed, increased dividends be an evi- 
dence of suffering. Fall River is one of the principal manufactur- 
ing centers of the country, and may fairly be taken as a sample 
of the whole. The mills there are nearly all operated upon the 
joint stock plan, and their books are necessarily open to the in- 
spection of persons having an interest in them. The Springfield 
Republican reprints from the columns of the Financial Chronicle a 
list of the dividends paid by the Fall River mills for 1893. Of 
course, the reader expects to be told that a great and even ruin- 
ous falling off was experienced. People who " get the news " 
from the partisan dailies could, of course, anticipate nothing else. 
Yet the fact was otherwise. Eleven of the mills during 1893 made 
a net earning upon capital of 17.75 per cent, as against 16.50 per 
cent, for 1892. Yet these poor victims of threatened tariff revis- 
ion cried aloud for help, and just before the November election 
cut wages, and predicted they would be compelled to close their 
mills. Fancy a shrewd New Englander abandoning a business 
paying nearly 18 per cent, upon tbe capital invested 1 Most of 
the mills paid a larger, and very few of them a less, dividend than 
in 1892. This fact ought to silence certain of our daily contem- 
poraries, but it won't. 

IT IS WELL TO BE CAREFUL. 



IT is said, but it can hardly be true, that the Supreme Court 
itself displays a desire to hasten the hearing of the pending 
appeals in tbe Blythe case. It may be well understood that the 
, plaintiff and, perhaps, other parties to the litigation, are hungry 
for a division of the property, and, when they are ready, some, 
not all, of the plaintiff's attorneys speak with great authority 
and determination, even before the Court, and insist that the 
appeals, in all their parts, shall be heard at once. In some of 
the appeals, when the case was last called, the briefs for the 
plaintiff or respondent had been filed for only one or two days, 
and the law allowed the appellants ten days to reply, which 
might be extended for twenty days longer; and yet, these very 
appeals were ordered to be heard on Monday next. This pre- 
cipitancy is not only unusual, but it is contrary to the settled 
practice in other cases. It is true that the law gives probate 
cases precedence, in order to facilitate the settlement of estates, 
but the Court has frequently, and even recently, held that an 
action, not part of the proceedings in the estate itself, is not in 
probate, and, therefore, not within tbe statute, and has refused, 
on that ground, to advance appeals. There are many other 
cases, quite as important, to those interested in them, as the 
Blythe case. Many cases have been under submission for months 
beyond the constitutional period, which are undecided. 

If the plaintiff and respondent in the Blythe case actually is 
the daughter of Thomas H. Blythe and has been adopted or insti- 
tuted, she ought to have at least half of the property. But, as 
speculative interests in her chances of success have been widely 
scattered, and some of those held by her principal witnesses are 
very large, and because of tbe remarkable history and surround- 
ings of tbe case, it is generally believed by the public, which does 
not quite comprehend all the methods of lawyers and courts, that 
her final success, if it comes, should be the result of very earnest 
and complete deliberation, and that even the appearance of dis- 
crimination in this particular instance should be carefully avoided. 

Business men and citizens generally are very censorious just 
now in their estimates of our courts, and, while public opinion 
cannot legally, and ought not practically, to affect any particular 
record, still it might reasonably induce, under our form of govern- 
ment, some extra care and scrutiny even in the highest tribunal 
of a State. 



IN AID OF THE UNEMPLOYED. 

THBeleotlon of v. Mitchell ltunk-r, editor of the />.■■'(■/ 

Report, to the chairmanship of the committee for the relief of 

Hie unemployed, may be regarded not only as a deserved 
pllmenl to Hie newspapei profanlOD, but also ns the proper n 
union of tbe sen , Mr. Hunker bun rendered to tbe 

work. Four years ago be was a member of a similar oomn 
and at tbat time wu tbe leading spirit in the movement, and it 
was his idea at that time n bleb won so much praise and confidence 
for the then committee — that is, to conduct the administration of 
affairs in an Inexpensive way, so that there would be no waste 
lor clerk hire, etc. When the movement (or the relief of the un- 
employed started on this occasion, he at once took an active in- 
terest in it, and when tbe committee was named, the members 
Immediately suggested that he take the chairmanship. Tbis be 
declined to do, because, he said, bis newspaper and other inter- 
ests would not allow him to spare the time. However, he was 
made vice-chairman, and was appointed to the finance commit- 
tee. As soon as a collection district was assigned to him he went 
out immediately, and the fact that he gave the work the same 
attention that he would have given to a professional matter is 
evidenced by the fact that in eight days he collected about $10,- 
000 in subscriptions varying from $1 to $1000. In the meantime 
be had aided in shaping the work in Golden Gate Park, and in- 
sisted that the money collected should be used in the develop- 
ment of the resources of the Park— not on the borders but 
well inside, in order that no one property-owner should be bene- 
fitted at the expense of another. His views in this matter were 
admitted to be eminently just, and were accepted and carried out 
by the committee. When David Bush, chairman of the commit- 
tee, was compelled to resign, by reason of the necessity for going 
East to look after interests there, Mr. Bunker, who had all along 
been doing the greater part of the work, was very properly put 
at the head of the committee. His views of the purpose of the 
relief fund are well known, and it should be a matter of pride to 
the citizens of this city tbat the relief movement here has been 
managed according to those views and in a model way. The 
management of the fund has surpassed in all respects the work 
in Eastern cities, nearly all of which, it should be borne in mind, 
are doing something of the kind. As every dollar goes directly 
to the men for whom it is intended, with no leaks for clerk-hire 
or anything of that kind, our people should make a point of con- 
tributing handsomely to the fund. 



SPRINGER'S BANK BILL. 



CONGRESSMAN SPRINGER is one of the leaders of the dom- 
inant party whose public acts are always worthy of respectful 
consideration. When he proposes a measure we may be very 
sure that it has been tbe subject of careful thought, and that it 
will be championed with signal ability. He recently introduced 
a hill to remodel the national banking system of the country, 
that is attracting much attention in the Eastern press. It is con- 
ceded on all sides that the subject matter of tbe bill will have to 
be taken up and dealt with ere long. It may not be quite ripe 
for settlement at tbis moment, but that is only because public 
men have not given it the consideration its importance demands, 
and because acknowledged authorities are not, agreed as to what 
is the wisest and best thing to do under existing circumstances. 
Perhaps no other question now engaging public attention has 
called out so wide a diversity of extreme opinions. Between 
John Sherman, the able leader of conservative interests, and 
Petfer, of Kansas, the mouthpiece of tbe Populists, who go in for 
Treasury notes iBsued against corn on the cob, there is an im- 
measurable distance. The practical statesman who bends his 
mind to the task of bringing order out of this chaos of opinion is 
entitled to public gratitude. This, Congressman Springer has 
honestly endeavored to do, and although his proposals may not 
be adopted, he is none the less to be honored for his effort to 
solve a difficult problem. He proposes that the government shall 
print a national currency and issue it to any solvent bank with a 
paid-up capital of not less that $25,000, on the deposit of either 
United Stales, or State, county, parish, or city bonds which have 
been at par for two years and the interest paid. The entire 
assets of the bank are also liable to the government for the re- 
payment of its loan. The bonds are to be exempt from taxation, 
federal and local. Banks depositing other than government 
bonds are to receive 90 per cent of their face value. The govern- 
ment assumes all responsibility for tbe redemption of its currency 
thus lent, and which be redeemed by it in coin upon demand. 
The banks are to be subject to the same governmental examin- 
ation and control as now. The provisions of the proposed act 
are to be carried out by a currency commission composed of the 
Secretary of the Treasury, the Treasurer and Comptroller. These 
proposals do not meet tbe requirements of the Chicago platform 
as to State banks, but it is thought that they meet the views of 
the administration and of a majority of the party in Congress. 
Quite a number of opposition papers favor the proposals. The 
subject ought not to be made one of party warfare. 





SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 


Jan . 20, 1894. 


GOTHAM GOSSIP. 




LAWN TENNIS. 



New York, Jan. 11, 1894. 

I HAVE no manner of doubt that the announcement of the new- 
international engagement will be of as intense interest in San 
Francisco as it is in this larger city. For my part, I think that 
the Bonynges deserve immense credit for reaching the social 
heights they have attained, and for maintaining their footing in 
exalted regions when so many vicious attacks were made upon 
them. Both the daughters are pretty and accomplished— good 
musicians and linguists, and modest and amiable girls. For 
years they have been protege^ of the Princess Christian, and her 
protection has availed them much. 

What a pity it is that some of the English maidens do not give 
their names or fortunes to American youths! I do not think, 
though, that it is bard to understand, for we are growing more 
and more exacting of an entourage of pomp and ceremony, and 
the "form" which is "all ready made" in England has a charm 
about it which is lacking in our enthusiastic imitation. 

I was very surprised to see, the other day, a man who used to 
be the "beau" par excellence of San Francisco, who afterward was 
more or less of a recluse, shining, like Ned Sheldon, only upon 
rarely exclusive reunions, and who has now, for lo, these many 
years, been a man of family out in Yokohama. This was none 
other than Chambler Howard, who married pretty Miss Nellie 
Hopps, the artist, some six or seven years ago. He looks a 
little older, but has not lost bis symmetry nor that of his "gentle- 
manly legs." He was one of the foreign guests at the Patriarchs' 
a few nights ago. I suppose he felt more or less like a Patriarch 
himself in San Francisco when he passed through that city, for it 
must be fifteen years since he used to disport himself in attend- 
ance upon pretty Lita Ogden (now Mrs. Richard Pease) or John 
Earl's handsome niece and her opposite neighbor, the nightingale- 
throated Miss Garnett. Days of past triumphs! I suppose they 
seemed like ancient history to your present whirl. 

Mrs. "Dick" Lounsbury was hostess at a reception a few days 
ago, and was assisted in receiving by her sister, Mrs. McAfee, 
who has torn herself for a time from Paris to visit her family in 
America. I do not know whether she proposes extending her 
journey to San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Henry Savage have cards out for an 
afternoon reception on Friday, and another at home a week later 
from eight until eleven. Mrs. Savage is only convalescent from 
a sharp throat attack, the recent damp weather having been 
much too trying for her as well as for many others. 

Mrs. James Lake, who was very ill in November from conges- 
tion of the lungs, has had a relapse lately, and her physicians 
think that she will be obliged to go to a warmer climate for Feb- 
ruary and March. The transplanting of Cahfornians is not 
always successful. 

The Theatre Club, which was organized last winter by a num- 
ber of well-known people, has just renewed its theatre parties. 
Miss Isabelle Murphy, the sister of the witty Helene (Madame 
Domingues) is one of its members. 

Mrs. Ogden Mills was hostess at a dance last night, which was 
preceded by several dinners given by intended guests. Mrs. 
Whitelaw Reid gave one of these dinners, and had among her 
guests Mr. and Mrs. Heber Bishop aod Miss Edith Bishop, her 
cousin. 

The matrimonial announcements to-day include the one of 
Budd Doble (formerly husband of Clara "Lucky Baldwin") and 
Miss Hortense Macdonald, known professionally as Hortense 
Paulsen. She has sung in light opera, and her fine contralto has 
been often heard also in church music. The announcement of 
Lillian Russell's engagement is a great surprise, as it was gener- 
ally supposed that she had foresworn matrimonial ventures. 
However, the charms of Perugini seem to have been potent. I 
dare say that be is remembered in San Francisco, where he sang 
with the McCaull Company several years ago. "Billy" Sandford, 
so long her devoted admirer, is now languishing in a private in- 
sane asylum; so he will be spared the hearing of Lillian's wed- 
ding bells. 

The Florida season opened last night with a ball at the Ponce 
de Leon. Among the guests were lieutenants Heary and Capron 
and Dr. Coxton, who will shortly rejoin their regiment at Benicia 
Barracks. Passe-Partodt. 



A GRAND reception was held at the Marquam Opera House, 
Portland, Oregon, on the evening of the 1st inst., after the 
Stanford team of California had defeated the Multnomahs of 
Portland, Oregon, in a wonderful game of football. In thecourse 
of the proceedings the following happyspeech was made by John 
D. Mann: "Captain Wilson and Gentlemen: This occasion is 
taken advantage of by the ex-Californians resident in Portland to 
present to yon some souvenir of your visit to this city. As 
chairman of the committee appointed for the purpose, I desire to 
state that you hail from a college that is dear to the heart of the 
Californian. Its founder was one of the pioneers who hoisted 
the bear nag and added that golden territory to the wealth and 
importance of this nation. With this banner, gentlemen, we 
we wish you a prosperous New Year." 



LAWN tennis was cast aside for the rougher games of winter, 
and has slept its sleep peacefully, but lovers of the game have 
been taking up the racquet again, to practice for the numerous 
tournaments which are on the tapis for the coming season. This 
sport, comparatively unknown a few years ago, has grown so 
popular that it cannot rest, and this fact is clearly demonstrated 
when we see the large crowd of people who are always on hand 
for any interesting match, whether at San Rafael or at the courts 
of the California Lawn Tennis Clab. Last season was, unfor- 
tunately, rather a tame one, and this was probably due to the 
withdrawal of W. H. Taylor, Jr., from active playing, and, more- 
over, no one thought any especially good player would take his 
place. The tennis at the championship meeting was not up to 
the average, but there are many players now who, with the prac- 
tice they can have, ought to make this season a very brilliant 
one, and add interest to every tournament in which they may be 
participants. Champion Driscoll will have to work hard to hold 
his title this year, and it is learned that be has withdrawn from 
the Oakland Club, which, by the way, wants some new life put 
into it, and has joined the California Club, where he has been 
playing already with Professor Daily and with ex-champion 
Taylor. The style Driscoll exhibited last season at San Rafael 
was not at all that of a champion, but it is only fair to say that 
be was badiy handicapped by lameness, and might have shown 
better form, and it is not doubted that be will suffer defeat unless 
he improves considerably. At present it would be foolish to ad- 
vance any suggestions as to who will hold the championship this 
year, but after the season really opens, and we shall have had 
time to see who are on the courts, more light can easily be 
thrown on the subject. 

The first tournament that has been heard of so far is to be held 
at the courts of the California Lawn Tennis Club, at Scott and 
Bush streets, on February 22nd; it will be a double tournament 
for gentlemen, divided into iwo classes. The club is in a very 
flourishing way, and hopes to make a greater success than ever 
this season. The members are by degrees turning up and taking 
their beating from the Professor bravely, knowing well that he 
can strike the rust from their stroke.? quicker than any one else. 
De Long, Stetson, the Whitneys, Hubbard, Taylor, Tobin and 
many others are playing fairly regularly, and many more will ap- 
pear as soon as the weather becomes more congenial. The 
directors of the club are the same as before, with the addition of 
E. M. Greenway, who, it is understood, will take up tennis again 
with energy this year. President Linderman is playing tennis 
at present in Mexico, and will probably bring back new stiokes 
and do wunders at the first match. C. R. Yates was umpire the 
other day at the club, and when one remembers how much this 
gentleman did for tennis, his absence from the courts is deplora- 
ble. Another, in the shape of Vernon Gray, would also be very 
acceptable. 

THE Patriarchs' Ball, the great society event of the winter in 
New York, was held at Delmonico's on the 9th inst., and 
society and swelldom were oat in force. The New York papers 
write it up very fully, even to the reproduction of the menu, 
which was elaborate and yet combined the most delicious and 
delicate things in season and out of season. An interesting thing 
to note is that instead of mentioning many wines, there was 
only one champagne, and one table mineral water, namely, Meet 
& Chandon "Blanc" and Apollinaris. This is not only the cus- 
tom at the Patriarchs' balls, but at all swell entertainments in 
the East. It is, in fact, the latest fad of society. 



THE large number of friends of Domingo Ghirardelli, senior 
member of the firm of Ghirardelli & Sons, the chocolate man- 
ufacturers of this city, have been shocked to hear of his death, 
which occurred unexpectedly at Rapallo, Italy, this week. He 
had gone to Rapallo, which is his old home, on a visit, and was 
suddenly carried off by an attack of grip. He was seventy-six 
years of age, and leaves a widow and several children. The 
entire community will miss the presence and kindly influence of 
this estimable man. 



NAVAL OFFICER John P. Irish will be tendered a banquet by 
his friends in the Maple Room of the Palace Hotel on Thurs- 
day evening, February 1st. Channcey M. St. John is chairman 
of the committee which is making the arrangements for the 
affair, which will be entirely non-partisan in character. Friends 
of the well-known politician from Los Angeles, San Jose, Vallejo, 
Napa and all parts of the State will be present, and the toasts 
will be made and responded to by some of the most notable men 
in California. 

One of the few places in San Francisco where you can get a lunch- 
eon or a dinner cooked to suit your taste is at Bergez's, 334 Pine street, 
below Montgomery. This restaurant is situated in the heart of the 
business and banking center of the city, and for a long time it has 
been patronized by men who are particular about their menus. The 
kitchen is in charge of a celebrated chef, and every thing is done to 
satisfy the patrons of a good dinner. Ducks and all kinds of game 
and fish are cooked to a turn. 



Jan 20. 1894. 



HAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



BACHELOR GIRLS. 



[Bt Di Vimoh.I 

PiK the li>( few years we have heard a good deal of the bache- 
lor girl, of Dorothy rlata, and of institutions which attempt to 
provide hornet fur working girls or women without family ties. 
These institutions have not proved -uocessful. The American girl 
who earns her own living with her h mils or her brain*, is not apt to 
take to a place where the rules ami reflation? put her under martinet 
discipline, and subject her to many humiliations and annoyances. 
No girl wishes to be watched, spied upon, end reported to a matron. 
No matter how amenable she may be to the abstract principles of 
law and order, she can not help beiriL* annoyed at having them applied 
to her particular case when it seem? like personal persecution. 

It has been amply demonstrated ihat, by combining their forces, 
several girls can live much more economically, and certainly more 
comfortably, than in the boarding-houses to which their means 
would admit them. In all large cities there are many girls earning 
their living, and by necessity separated from their families. What 
more natural than that two or more should consider the advisability of 
taking a Hat in common and living as economically and as comforta- 
bly as their means will allow ? Add to the thought of economy the 
extra inducement of congeniality, similarity of tastes and pursuits, 
and the explanation of " bachelor apartments," as they are called, is 
exceedingly simple. 

Bat the term" bachelor apartments" may mean a variety of things. 
In these latter days of the century men and women have seemed to 
change places in many of their prerogatives. For instance, we find 
" sissy men " giving society teas in their ladylike apartments, and 
brave girls keeping bachelor hall. The fact is, that when a woman 
steps out from the ranks of those who are supported by others, and 
tenderly cared for by circumstances or friends, she makes many a 
departure from the rigid lines of conventionality without offending 
against the true spirit of propriety. 

Time was when two ladies, regardless of age, could not go alone to 
a place of amusement in the evening. A man to act as escort was 
absolutely indispensable. Who now will maintain that a mother may 
not act as escort to her daughter at all social gatherings ? 

More than this, owing to the dearth of men and to the lack of 
funds, as well as lack of inclination among the men, women are be- 
coming more and more independent of them in a social way. Women 
who are not married are seen out together in the evening much 
more often tbun formerly. This phase of social life is increasing in 
America, and the " bachelor girls " are only the recognized sign of a 
condition of things that has existed for a long time. 

The term somehow carries with it the insinuation of strong-minded- 
ness, as if the girls who have thus combined for mutual interest were 
" mannish," wore masculine attire, talked loud and deep, and affected 
a scorn for the opposite sex. This does not follow, by any means. 
Some of the sweetest, most lovable and most ladylike girls 1 have 
ever known were self-supporting, and lived with other ladies in a flat 
sustained by a common fund. Several of them married when the 
right man came along. But the bachelor girl is not husband-hunting ; 
she is too busy for that. 

This is one sort of a bachelor girl. There is another type. She is 
likely to be found first in the top floor of a fashionable family hotel, 
and, contradiction of terms, she may be a married woman, with an 
absent husband, or a widow. Finally she announces her determina- 
tion to leave her quarters in something like these words : " I have 
hired a tiny fiat. I am going to keep house all by myself. I am 
tired of having every old hen in this house know just who comes to 
see me, even to timing every visit. I am sick of so much gossip. Be- 
sides, I want something to eat. So I shall set up a bachelor's hall." 
And she does. This is the kind of woman whose friends are to be 
found only among men— among those who speak of her as a "jolly 
good fellow," who throng her parlors and enjoy themselves; and tell 
their chums about her afterwaids. She may be a school-teacher 
(there have been such in the department), or she may be a woman of 
artistic abilities who is fortunately in the receipt of a large income 
from her drawings, or her foreign language translations, which she 
does to order. She lives in her flat, and she amuses herself as she 
chooses; but she ought not, for obvious reasons, to speak of her 
" bachelor " establishment. 

There have been girls— music-teachers, for example— throwu into 
acquaintanceship by residence in the same boarding house. One has 
many pupils. The other is merely struggling along. The first one, 
out of her abundance, gives the other some of her least desirable 
pupils. Finally they hire a flat or combine forces for themselves. 

There recently visited San Francisco two examples ot bachelor 
girls. Since they are professional women and appear before the pub- 
lic in their specialties, it will not be unkind on my part to mention 
them. I refer to the Misses Biggart and Gumaer, young ladies who 
are traveling all over the United States, paying their way as they go 
by entertainments which consist of readings by Miss Biggart, from 
Adam Bede and Ben Hur, interspersed with contralto solos by Miss 
Gumaer. They are perfectly happy in their chosen vocation, and 
are so generously appreciative of each other's work that it is both a 
pleasure and an inspiration to hear them recount their aims, ambi- 
tions, experiences and achievements. 



There have turn bachelor rM*ti|i*hinrnt-« Ml up in llii*. city by 
nhoo) principals and ne farortd aaaUtant in ttofa lnitan< 

happened that tin- prii | »1 was much older than bat ompanion. 
With what result ["he yotmgtr woman, never released from the 
strain of being with her departmental superior, loal all her spontane- 
ity and naturalne?". In referred '". this resulted in a 
complete breakdown of the younger woman. One has not, to tin 
day, recovered from lirr nervous prostration. Into all these relations 
enters the factor of jealousy. The older the woman, the more li< 
will resent the friendships, the outside com punionships of the younger 
woman with whom she i- keeping bachelor hall. She will cut her off 
from all BOCiety. She will taboo all association with men. In time 
the girls who have set up bachelor quarters will find themselves 
bonnd to a life of single-blessedness. 

When a man is jealous of a woman it is bad enough, but when a 
woman is in love with a woman and is jealous of her, the case is 
hopeless for both of them. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 



8HTPPING and COMMISSION MEBCHANTS 



• AND 

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GENERAL INS USANCE AGENTS. 



Nos- 309 and 311 Sanaome Street, San Francisco. 
National Assurance Company .... }p Ireland 

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Boylston Insurance Company ------ of Boston 

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DR. JOHN GALLWEY 
HI.A.S EBMOVBD 
to his new offices, 634 KEARNY Street, near Clay. 
Hours— 1 :30 to 4 p . M. and 7 :30 to 9 p . M. 
Telephone 207.] I Residence, 1331 Leavenworth. 



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Removed from Phelan Building, to 
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etas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for pois- 
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135 Montgomery St., near Bush, San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan . 20, 1894. 




WD 



"We Obev no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

THE dearth of novelties in the week's theatricals gives an 
interest to the return of The Ensign to the California, almost 
equal to that of novelty. In fact, the number of changes in the 
cast during the year which has elapsed justifies this interest in 
calling for a consideration of the people if not of the play itself. 

The wonderful make-up which gave so startling a realism to 
the appearance of Logan Paul as Abraham Lincoln is apparently 
identical with that of Mr. Wilson Deal, who now assumes this 
silent but impressive personation in addition to his excellent 
portrayal of Captain Wilkes of the U. S. S. San Jacinto. If the 
resalt seem to lack something of the realistic impressiveness of 
the assumption by Mr. Paul, it may be due solely to the fact 
that the latter gave the audience an almost overwhelming sur- 
prise in the sight of the dead President walking alive upon the 
stage, while in the present case the illusion being expected loses 
this important element. One point, however, which tends some- 
what toward disillusionment, can claim no such explanation — a 
point so slight that in a less carefully studied personation it 
would be unworlby of mention. In the slight and hasty nod 
with which Mr, Deal acknowledges the acclamations which greet 
his appearance as the President, he seems to step out of and apart 
from the character, and to give the recognition in bis own person. 
It is but for a second, but it is enough to break tbe spell, and in 
this may fairly be adjudged a mistake artistically considered. If 
Mr. Deal's sense of the courtesy due his audience demands a 
bow, it should be one of that dignified gravity with which 
Lincoln himself might have acknowledged an ovation from the 

people. 

* » * 

There is considerably more "doubling-up" than in the cast first 
here. Mr. Geo. Sprague appears as Gideon Welles, Secretary of 
the Navy, in addition to the part of Lieut. Blythe, sustained last 
year respectively by Howard Scott and Benjamin Horning. Mr. 
Paul Gilmore also doubles as Admiral Farragut and Sergeant 
O'Shay, doing tbe small part well. Mr. Atkins Lawrence has 
superseded B. R. Graham as Jack Dudley, and makes the rough- 
and-ready cox'n more popular if possible than before. Alice 
Greer, Mrs. Wilkes, and Dot are all in new hands, and Mr. 
Walter Edwards has taken the place of James Neil! in the leading 
part of Ben Baird, the Ensign, none of the changes being detri- 
mental and some of them an improvement. The excellent work 
of Mr. Hardy Vernon, as Captain of H. M. S. Warrior, is fully 
duplicated this year by the same actor under a different nom du 
theatre. 

As a play with an "influence, " The Ensign cannot be too highly 
commended. Ridicule is generally the weapon of the illogical, 
and while it is easy to excite "the laughter of fools" by bur- 
lesquing high-wrought sentiment as it is likely to find expression 
in the drama, tbe wiser and more thinking part of the commun- 
ity would shrink from directing such weapon against even the 
most high-flown declamation which impresses on American 
youth or manhood the sentiments of honor and patiiotism — tbe 
decadence of which sentiment in the American heart means the 
decadence of American glory and unity. We cannot have too 
many plays like The Ensign to keep at least an equilibrium 
between the so-called "heroics" and the demoralization of every 
higher principle toward which our latter-day admire-nothing and 
believe-in-nothing policy is fast leading us. 

* * * 

At the Baldwin The Dancing Girl is having its second week, 
with the evident result of deepening the favorable impression 
made by Henry Arthur Jones's powerful drama, as also of Mr. 
Wilton Lackaye's strong personation of tbe leading character. 
Next week Sydney Grundy's comedy, A Pair of Spectacles, will be 
put on, beginning Monday night. T^ie reserve repertory of the 
Palmer Company is a long and strong one, and promises a con- 
tinuance of the enjoyment which has attended its opening per- 
formances. 

* # * 

This is the last week of the Tivoli's successful spectacular pro- 
duction of The Island of Jewels. The introduction of new songs, 
dances, and comicalities, has made the operetta virtually a new 
one, whiie tbe scenic attractions have been a continued addition 
to the evident satisfaction of iis unfailing large audiences. Miss 
Fannie Liddiard has achieved a so-far unnoted, but noteworthy, 
triumph by proving that the "fairy queen" in a spectacle need 
not declaim her lines in a monotonous recitative suggestive of a 
speaking doll of the woodenest variety, a style heretofore sup- 
posed inseparable from this character. It is to be hoped that 
Miss Liddiard's welcome innovation will dispel the existing 
prejudice and encourage future fairy queens to talk like other 
women. Miss Liddiard is evidently a woman of brains, and that 
"brains will tell" U nowhere truer than on the stage — even tbe 
stage of burlesque and farce. 



Lottie Collins, who has booiu-de-ayed herself into the front 
rank of theatrical "stars," will head the new Boston Howard 
Athenieum Company to follow The Ensign at the California. Miss 
Collins has, of course, just returned from Europe, or she would 
be but a rush-light to the blazing comet she is, and has brought 
back two new dances— Marguerite and the Rainbow dance — be- 
side her original one, the trail of whose glories she has left over 
all Europe. Our jeunesse doree are now lying back and fanning 
themselves into the strength requisite to bear the coming sensa- 
tion. 

* * * 

Lillian Russell announces " authoritatively " that she has no 
understudy in Princess Nicotine and that consequently it is 
Lillian Russell or no Nicotine every time. Does this mean that 
the cloud thrown over the fat and fair, if not quite forty, 
ex-queen of the dudes in San Francisco, and which aroused her 
wrath to the scolding point, was the beginning of her career as a 
waning star, and that 'nary-fairy Lillian" fears the contrast 
with a younger and slimmer understudy ? Poor Lillian! There 
is but one way to compel popular admiration, and that way does 
not consist in keeping others out of the field. 

* * * 

The concert given Wednesday evening by Nathan Landsberger 
and Samuel G. Fleishman, under the management of Mr. Philip 
Hastings, was one of the most successful of the present season. 
The interest felt here in the talented young pianist is a strong 
one, and his solo performance, a difficult Chopin number, Polon- 
aise op. 53. showed that the feeling is more than justified. Mr. 
Fleishman's style is both brilliant and powerful, while his modest 
and unassuming manner adds a personal charm to that of his 
artistic work. Mr. Lands berger's violin playing is always a 
pleasure to bear, and was conspicuously enjoyable in tbe Polon- 
aise in D major, by Wieniawski. A Beethoven sonata for violin 
and piano was also effectively interpreted by the two young 
artists. The novelty of the evening was a quartette by Albert 
Becker, its first production here, which was beautifully rendered 
by Messrs. Fleishman, Landsberger, Jaulus, and Heine. Mrs. 
Sedgeley-Reynolds, contralto, was the vocalist. 

Tbe Young Ladies' Saturday Morning Orchestra, J. H. Rose- 
wald, director, will give its next annual concert at the Grand 
Opera House Monday evening, February 5ib, in aid of two im- 
portant charities, the Children's Hospital and the Pioneer Kinder- 
garten. These talented young ladies are too popular to need 
more than a mere announcement to fill tbe bouse with their 
friends and admirers. They will be assisted by Miss Annie Lyle, 
Miss Julia Newman, Mrs. Andrew Bogart, and tbe San Francisco 
Glee Club, a bevy of beautiful and talented young ladies. 

Tbe Panorama of Yosemite Valley, now on exhibition at the 
Panorama Building, corner of Tenth and Market streets, is not 
only a noble work of art, but an invaluable aid to tbe imagina- 
tion for the vast number of sight-seers whom time and means 
prevent from making a trip to that region of wonders. As a 
realistic view of Yosemite, it is second ODly to the mighty 
original. 

* * * 

The Wigwam has been doing a splendid business during the 
week, the efforts of the management to make this the best variety 
theatre in the city having met with a generous recognition from 
the public. Gilbert and Goldie elicit Etorms of applause with 
their wonderful performance. Next week a new bill will be pre- 
sented, with many superior attractions. 

Tbe first Carr-Beel " Pop" of the new series will be given this 

afternoon. Stockwell's Theatre will be reopened shortly by 

James O'Neill and his own company. Manager John F. Bragg 

returned recently from a very successful Southern tour with Mrs. 
Hester A. Harland, Secretary of the Board of Managers of tbe 
World's Fair. Mr. Bragg's next lecture attraction here will be 

" Ben Hur 1 ' Lew Wallace. The sketch in which Lottie Collins 

will introduce her specialties at the California is called A Naughty 

Substitute. Mrs. Pacheco's Incog, under its sub title, Tom, Dick, 

and Harry, has made a " screaming" success at tbe Trafalgar 
Square Theatre, London, according to tbe report in the London 

journals. The Abbey Grau opera season, with the three great 

singers. Mmes. Melba, CalvS, and Eames, has created something 

like a furore in New York musical circles. Miss Margaret Reed 

is now the Bostonians' prima donna. ^—Camille d'Arville is en- 
gaged for A Trip to Venus to be produced at the Garden Theatre, 

New York, on the 31st inst. Emma Juch will return to the 

English opera stage next season. San Francisco's old favorite, 

Tagliapietra, was given a big benefit lately at the Casino, New 
York. " Tag" was the most dashing of toreadors, the ideal van- 
quisher of mad bulls and soft hearts.— —Fred Simonson, the 
eight-year-old piano prodigy, now has a rival only half his age. 
Is the time at hand when infants will give their first cry in chro- 
matic scales and demand a piano for a rattle? " Freund's 

Musical Weekly" for January 6th is a great number, worth filing 
away for reference. 



Jan. 20, 1894. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTS 



LONDON NOTES 



T Il.l.lAN 1 BIOB, the Ducbew ol M»r!borough_tbe -American 
J_, duchess -bitterly denie. tbml the contemplates another mar. 
nage. The Pncbess Lillian has now a »iron K foothold in Bogllib 
aoclety. Having secured a loclal following and an idmtnlon Into 
the royal circle on special occasion*, 11 is not probable that the 
duchess will ever consent to marry any bin a titled man. if as 
she says, she ever make* another marital venture. Lillian still 
bears traces of beauty, but her manner has become grave, serious 
and dignified. Those who knew her as the lovely, laughing Mk, 
Trice, would fail to recognize her now. Wealth, title, adulation 
and honor have not succeeded in keeping back the lines of anx- 
iety and gray hairs. 

England's pension list for the last fiscal year will astonish 
American citizens. Her last preat war— in the Crimea— antedated 
that in the I nited States by but a few years, and she has had 
the Indian mutiny and many little wars with savages within 
forty years. Moreover, she has a large civil pension list. Yet 
the total amount paid out lor all kinds of pensions for the year 
endme March, 1892, was £7.588,863— less than $38.000 000, or 
about one filth of what Americans pay as the result of their civil 
war. Toe pensions lor the civil list amounted to £.',101, GST; for 
the army, £3,714 673; for the navy, £1.742.812, and for the sur- 
vivors of former very distinguished naval and military men, 
£29,, 20 The whole number of recipients of all classes is 162,040. 

By the death of Lord Ebury. Lord Grey is left as the sole sur- 
viving member of the Privy Council who was appointed in the 
reign of William IV. Lord Ebury was appointed in 1830, Mr. 
Gladstone in 1841, and then there is a long gap until the nomina- 
tions made in Lord Derby's Administration of 1852, of which the 
Duke of Rutland, Mr. Walpole, and the Earl of Bradford still sur- 
vive. 

It is a little pride-lowering to England for her to have become 
the object of Russia's pity on account of England's political insti- 
tutions. The Moscow Gazette, a leading and temperately-written 
paper, says in a recent number: "Nowhere yet has the weak- 
ness, we might almost say, the hopelessness, of a Government, 
resting on a parliamentary basis, been so unmistakably obvious 
as is now the case in that very home of parliaments— England," 

For the first time on record a Hebrew has been gazetted officer 
to one of the crack Highland regiments of Queen Victoria's army. 
These regiments, notwithstanding their Scotch origin and dress, 
are nowadays composed mainly of Englishmen, Welshmen and 
Irishmen. But this is the first time they have had on their ros- 
ters a Highlander of the chosen race, which prior to the pres- 
ent reign, was barred from holding commissions in the army and 
navy, and even from membership of Parliament. 

It may interest wealthy Americans who desi.-e to possess them- 
selves of ancient baronial halls in England that several interest- 
ing estates are for sale. These include Middleton Towers, the 
Norfolk home of the late King's Lynn banker, Sir Lewis Jarvis; 
Rotbley Temple, Leicestershire, the birthplace of Lord Macaulay ; 
Hardres Court, Canterbury, belonging to Colonel Laurie, C. B., 
where were to be seen for many years the famous gates of Bou- 
logne, a present from Henry VIII.; Purse Caundle, in Dorset, 
with just such another Old English mansion as Ockwells, which 
was sold the other day to Mr. Barry; Elmwood, near Stevanage, 
with associations of Lucas, the famous "Hertfordshire Hermit"; 
Studley Castle, Warwickshire, one of the three largest estates 
submitted to auction this year; and Redisham Hall, Suffolk, with 
sporting facilities ol an exceptional character. 

A telegram from Melbourne states that the prospect of a visit 
from the Duke and Duchess of York to Australia is warmly wel- 
comed by the Press. It is understood that the official invitations 
will be cabled simultaneously to-morrow by the Governors of the 
various colonies. The invitation was suggested by Mr. Patterson, 
tbe Victorian Premier. 






lt Fears Pictorial— think of it? Who has not beard of Pears' soap— 
the mighty, the unsurpassable, the inimitable Pears; name synony- 
mous with art in advertising, art in soap-making, and now art in 
journalism? A great pictorial, so cleverly divided between inter- 
preting art for art's sake and winning your love for Pears' soap, that 
one really appreciates the novel sensation. The supplements are 
superb. —Turf, field and Farm, Dec. 29, 1893. 

The half tone engravings, which for a long time have been a 
popular and artistic teature of the News Letter, are from the studio 
of Bolton & Strong, of 430 Pine street. The firm, which give par- 
ticular attention to this line of work, are at the head of their pro- 
fession upon the Pacific Coast. Their half-tone engravings are un- 
excelled in the West. They have far more than a local reputation, 
being widely known as excellent artists and artisans. 

The Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street, will remain the 
favorite lunching, dining and catering establishment, and seller of all 
sorts of edible dainties in the shape of sweetmeats and pastries, as 
long as the good sense of the people of San Francisco remains at its 
present high state of development. Everybody knows what a delight- 
ful place Swain's always is. 

.A man with a comfortable shirt on his back shows the fact in his 
face, and will say that he bought it of John W. Carmany, 25 Kearny 
street. 



Would you rather buy lamp- 
chimneys, one a week the 
year round, or ore that lasts 
till some accident breaks it? 
ii glass, Macbeth's 
I top' it "pearl glass," 
almost never break from heat; 
not one in a hundred. 

Where can you get it? and what does it co^t ? 
Vour ■' ill i knows where and how much. It 
than common glass; and may be, he. 
Uimks touch glass isn't good for his business, 
Pittsburgh. Giio. A. MAcoiiTH Co. 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

ALHiYMiN * Co Proprietors. | J. J. qottlob Manager 

Monday, January 22d-Last week of the great naval drama 

THE ENSIGN. 

Monday, Jan. 23-I.OTTIE COI.I.1KS, fn conjunction with the famous 
BOSTON 
HOWARD 
ATHEN.EUM 
SPECIALTY CO. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Al Havman & Co . t 

A. M. PALMER'S STOCK boMPANY 11 "^" 6 ' " 
comeay^rama!' JanUary ^-^^r "oyelty, Sydney Grundy's brilliant 

w , APAIR OF SPECTACLES. 

Which will be g.veniu conjunction with the beautiful character episode 
ONE T OUCH OF NATURE. 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 



Keeling Bros .... Proprietor, and Managers 

Last nights. Fourth and last week of the triumphant success, 



THE ISLAND OF JEWELS. 

;ric March, the won 

Sua et City." Hear all 



rSXtt^XuSStft cr^nTllorf ««<>^rct,th, wondrous 
the latest songs. B e : ' 

. Jauuary 22d-THE 1IEGGAK STUDENT 

Popular Prices 



25 and 50c 



„ , WIGWAM THEATRE, 

Mrs. Chas. Mayer, Proprietor. Prank and Albert Meyer, Business Managers 
San Frai Cisco's Recognized Vaudeville Familv Resort 
Commencing Monday evening, January 22. IS 4 The Greatest bill of the 
LThable s U kir alUS ' B emertainm ^ will commence wnhDol^hLevino's 

EVANS, NOBRELI, .v SCOTT, 

After which will appear the following specialties: R 01 al Japanese TrouDe 

vnii n ,?, umbe , r ' m a 6 . erles ° f , startling acrobatic feat„? juggHng? etc ' Sfisl- 

I 1 , le '^V. r y?>P" m \ e . T * rlal Rational gy muabt . ialeombe^ MaePhe,- 



son, Columbiau Troubadors. 



gyrauabt. Saleombe & MacPber- 

Ando and.Omne Eiwood; the utUfovrzS": Seventh^k^oShTnd 
Susie Levino. Miss Clara Edwards, Song and Uao.ce Artiste GilbaYt and 
Gold.e. Miss Beatrice James, Operatic Vocalist and Baffardist.Al Leech 
Every evening at 8. Matinee Saturday and Sunday at 2. 
General admission, 10c. Reserved seats, 25c ODera chairs <t*e 
Matinee Prices-General amission, luc Operacnalrs Se ' 

GOLDEN GATE HALL. 

625 Sutter St. 

33d CARR-BEEL SATURDAY POP. CONCERT 

Takes place January ssoth, at 3 p. M. 

"Grieg Programme." Admission 50 cents. 

THE GRANDEST 0N~EARTH. SEE 

YOSEMITE PANORAMA, 

(Corner of Tenth and Market Streets.) 
NOW, OPEN. Admission. 



,S5cts 



AN RFDHARn The Easbsb actress coaches ladies and 
L.ILLIHH U LUUH 1 1 U, gentlemen for the dramatic profession; ap- 
pearances arranged. SHAKESPEAREAN ACAUEMY, 1007 California 
Street, opposite the Flood Mansion. 



THE 

BANJO 

IS 

FASHIONABLE 



ASHTON F. STBVE1TS 

Has resumed instruction. 
Studio : NO. 26 MONTGOMERY STREET. 



Room No. 8. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEB. 



Jan. 20. 1894. 



J^ tooker-op. 



CP. HUNTINGTON may drop in any of these short winter 
, days to see his little family of five hundred "boys" in his 
big brick house at Fourth and Townsend streets. A good many 
of the lads expect a spanking when tbe "old man" makes his 
annual visit to the State, but tbey are generally disappointed. 
Mr. Huntington is one of the few men of vast acquired wealth 
who do not credit their extraordinary acumen with all of their 
wonderful successes, for he declares that luck has a great deal 
more to do with such successes than most of the beneficiaries are 
willing to believe. In illustration of this he tells the following 
story on himself; it is a case wherein that which he flattered him- 
self was extraordinary foresight on his part produced negative 
results: 

When he was a shopkeeper at Sacramento in the early days, he 
learned that vises, so necessary to mining camps, were becoming 
scarce in California, and that as a ship laden with vises had been 
reported lost in rounding the Horn, local prices for them would 
take a tremendous bound. He knew that a business rival carried 
a large stock of vises, which were unsalable, because, having 
been submerged in salt water on the way to California, they were 
badly rusted. Mr. Huntington called on his rival, casually in- 
spected the vises, and discovered that beside a coating of rust 
tbey bad not been damaged at all, and that they were of tbe best 
manufacture. There was a very large lot of them, and if they 
had been good-looking they would have been worth about 
eight dollars apiece. 

"What are you selling those vises at?" asked Mr. Huntington. 

"A dollar and a half apiece," was the reply. 

"Very well; I'll take the entire lot at tbat figare." 

The astonished merchant gladly accepted the offer. Mr. Hun- 
tington removed them to his own store and had his clerks rub 
them up with sandpaper and thus make them as good as if new. 
Sure enough, vises soon came in demand, and Mr. Huntington 
thought that his fortune was in sight. He sold a few at eight 
dollars, then raised tbe price to ten. Next month tbey surely 
would bring twenty-Gve dollars, then fifty, and then God knows 
what. It was soon learned that he had the only vises for sale in 
California, and tempting offers were made for his entire stock. If 
he bad accepted them he would have made a great deal of money, 
but he felt sure that he could make at least twice as much. Be- 
fore, however, he had sold a half dozen of his treasures, the ship 
which had been reported lost entered the port of San Francisco 
with her cargo of vises, and Mr. Huntington : s visions of wealtn 
from that deal were never realized. "Foresight is a good thing," 
he says, "if you have good luck with it." 

One day Mr. Huntington was strolling down Market street 
with a friend, and the discussion turned upon the simplicity and 
apparent unconsciousness of strength on the part of men who 
have risen to eminence by the power of brains. 

" In contemplating a great statesman, or artist, or philosopher, 
or poet," said Mr. Huntington, " we are apt to imagine tbat his 
mind is soaring far above the small, mean world in which we 
live, and that, instead of feeling that he is one of us — one of the 
great human family — he looks down upon us with contempt from 
the towering height upon which he stands, whereas, in fact, it 
is the humble, common humanity in him, his close fellowship 
with us, that enables him to be great. The head of a really great 
man is never turned by the height of the eminence on which he 
stands." 

Just then they were passing the Palace Hotel, across the street 
from which the top story of tbe tall Crocker building was being 
constructed. Mr. Huntington's companion, forgetting all about 
the conversation, pointed to a bricklayer who was standing on 
the narrow wall far above them. 

"See tbat man," said Mr. Huntington's friend. «* His position 
appears to be extremely perilous, and yet he workB away with 
the utmost unconcern, seemingly unconscious of the fact that a 
momentary dizziness or a mistake of an inch in his footing would 
send him to the ground, mangled out of shape. That man is doing 
what you could not do, Mr. Huntington." 

The railroad magnate regarded the workman a moment, and 
then replied: 

" I think I could, if I had started, as he did, at the bottom." 
t * • 

It would not be amiss, in this late day, to start a school for 
ushers. There is a field for it. How very few ushers could pass 
the simplest examination in politeness in the theatres in which 
tbeyushl What a horrible abomination it is for an usher to 
snap his fingers at an incoming guest, while be talks idly to some 
girl down in the front row, whom he has placed in a free seat. 
Then there is the fellow who chews gum, and the other fellow 
who slams down the seats when you come in late, so as to attract 



the attention of every man, woman and child in tbe theatre and 
interrupt the players. Then there is the usher who demands 
your checks with the impertinence of a footpad who demands 
your purse, and scornfully returns them as if tbey were bad and 
you had forged them, and remarks, » Next row," and then starts 
in to insult the next man; and the usher who rushes you into 
the wrong seats and then turns you out with tbe air of a magis- 
trate dismissing a prisoner. The Lookeb-Oh might swell the list 
of offenses indulged in every night, in every theatre here, from 
the programme boy, who thinks he wrote tbe play, to tbe head 
usher, who thinks he owns the theatre and tbe players. A school 
for ushers is the thing. The ushers of to-day seem to ush merely 
for the joy of wearing a swallow-tail coat and waistcoat and a 
pair of striped trousers. 

When Sir Samuel Baker, the African explorer, visited California, 
tbe most noticeable trait which tbat distinguished man exhibited 
was an extreme fondness for gazing into shop windows. It was 
the privilege of the Lookeb-On to receive an introduction to Sir 
Samuel at the Bohemian Club, of which he was the honored 
guest. This man, who bad encountered fearful dangers and had 
undergone almost incredible hardships, was at this time (some 
seven years ago) a low-sized, pudgy person, more resembling our 
idea of a German grocer than a man of marvelous muscle and 
enterprise, who dropped his African lions right and left with the 
same ease with which Alec Hamilton slays his birds on tbe 
Country Club's grounds. About this propensity of his to stare 
into shop windows, he used to laugh heartily and confess to the 
Lookee-On that it took Lady Baker and himself just one hour to 
traverse the east side of Montgomery street. "But," added Sir 
Samuel, "I am very fond of brandy punches, my boy, as you 
make them in San Francisco, and I used to drop in occasionally 
on the way, don't yon know, for refreshment — a practice to 
which Lady Baker, who is very good natured, never objected." 
Sir Samuel grew very fond of California during bis short stay 
here. The Looker On took bim out one day at his request to try 
his hand at the quail, which were then very plentiful on the 
Throckmorton Ranch, a shooting now preserved by the Sports- 
man's Club. The first bevy flushed Sir Samuel missed badly, to 
his extreme disgust; but, running into a few enipe, be was con- 
soled by securing a brace in a good right-and-left shot. He de- 
clared that after years of experience in the field, the California 
quail was tbe most difficult bird to bring to bag be had encoun- 
tered. Before the end of the day, however, he improved and did 
some very fair work. He grew most enthusiastic about our 
quail as a fast flying and game bird, and said that he would 
make an attempt to introduce them to the English covers. Lady 
Baker, who is herself no indifferent shot, was anxious to have a 
try at them herself, but Sir Samuel was called home, and neither 
of them ever saw California again. 



The Doctors' Daughters is the name of a charitable organiza- 
tion with a semi-ecclesiastical attachment, the members being all 
society young women. Tbey endeavor to render practical assist- 
ance to those in need of it, confining the scope of their efforts, 
however, to " the refined poor." Not long ago one of the offi- 
cers of the society discovered what she regarded as an eminently 
deserving case. A widow and her children were living in a 
wretched hovel, kept as well appearing as circumstances would 
permit. The family larder was empty, and the condition of the 
family wardrobe was shocking. Touched by the evident dis- 
tress, the young Lady Bountiful hastened to some of the other 
directors of the Doctors' Daughters, and necessary provisions 
were forthwith dispatched to the needy family. Clothing for 
the children was procured also, and the young lady had intended 
to present the mother with some of her own articles of apparel. 
Fearful of hurting the widow's feelings, she decided, however, 
to buy new garments. Upon returning to the house, she told 
the woman that the society would furnish what she most needed, 
and invited her to enumerate her most pressing wants. 

" It's so kind of you ladies," replied the poverty-stricken 
widow; " now if you will please get me one of those lovely jet 
belts. 1 have wanted one for years!" 

And not a thought about the rags that barely covered her! 



For the information of the poor and deserving foot-pad, we pre- 
sent the following list, which shows wheie some of our prom- 
inent citizens carry their wallets: M. H. de Young, in his bat, 
Colonel John P. Irish, in his boot; Alexander Badlam, doesn't 
carry any; ex-School Director Decker, in his wife's pocket; 
James L. Flood, in his watcb charm; Professor Jordan, in his 
massive brain; Editor Fitch, In the lining of his coat; Jeremiah 
Lynch, in his hip pocket; Donald deV. Graham, in his mind. 



" There were three empty bottles before uncle on tbe table," 
said a little tot, "and uncle's face was red as fire — from laugh- 
ing." This last clause he added on perceiving a storm gathering 
on his uncle's brow. 



Jan 



S\N FRAM [S -,) SEWS LETT] It 



TWO NEW BOOKS. 

WILLIAM DOXBY hu Jail l»»aed two volume* which are 
likely to ftltraci alteolton. The mora inllmaie fi 
the late Judge T. H. Krarden. of this city (who died May 10. 
knew him to be a icholar of conipfcuous erudition, hut 
outMde the Chitchat Club, of which be was a bright member, he 
was regarded only as a lawyer and Judge. Nevertheless, he was 
an uncommonly fine scholar and critic, as the book of critical 
Maya which be wrote and which has just been published by 
Pnxey clearly discloses. It is entitled ••Petrarch and Other 
Essays." those in addition to the ooe oo tbe great Italian poet 
being •• Alfred Tennyson. Poet Laureate." ■• Ditmaracb and Klaus 
Grotb," " Frit* Renter ? Life and Works." and " Ballads and 
At the end i* a y wm, "Tbe Sea! The Sea! " which, be- 
sides its intrinsic merit, has a certain interest in the fact that he 
Intended to read it before lieorge H. Thomas FV«t. G. A. R., on 
tbe occasion of its anniversary, and that the illness which after- 
ward terminated fatally prevented him. The opening stanza, in 
view of these circumstance?, has a pathetic significance: 

" Life's fevered day decline-; it<» purple twilight falling 
Draws length'ning shadows from the broken Hanks; 

And from tbe column's bead a viewless chief is calling; 
'Guide right— Close up your rank>. " 

There is another stanza which is equally strong: 

*' And there the stately captain* of the host immortal 

Call out the guard that ushers heroes in; •-•-* 

And each brave soul that, trembling, knocks at Death's dark portal, 
Is proudly mustered in." 

The review- of Petrarch's life and work is particularly strong 
with the insight of a critic who is cool as well as admiring. Of 
the Laura whom Petrarch loved in vain, and out of his ador- 
ation for whom came some of his finest impassioned verse, he 
has no high opinion. The essay on Tennyson is more scholarly, 
in that it delves deeper into the essence and inspiration of his 
work. His estimate of the Laureate is expressed in these words: 
"He is, as it were, the end of the Renaissance. There is no easy 
transition or succession from one generation to another. There 
is always a moral chasm intervening. The rising race may ad- 
mire Tennyson, but he will not be their representative poet. His 
prides, his sympathies, his affections, his politics, his beliefs, will 
be archaisms to their taste." The other essays show a fine 
knowledge of Dutch lyrics and a deep understanding of the value 
of ballads. 

The other book is a poem by John Vance Cheney, entitled 
"Ninette; A Redwoods Idyll." In the evolution of the story the 
poet is so obscure that very little can be made out of it at the first 
reading, whereas the very essence of folk-lore is simplicity, 
whether it be told in verse or prose. The redeeming feature of 
th<* poem consists in the very delightful descriptive bits with 
which it abounds. For instance: 



1 The wind was stirring, and the burr-oaks laid 
Great shadows, black along the blanching grass." 



Or- 



i£ 



" * * * clear, between the swells 
Of wind, clear, merry, rang the blackbird bells, 
While gurgling music, hurrying note to note, 
Spilled from the starling's overflowing throat." 
The lover, in describing Ninette, gives issue to the following 
fine bit of rapture: 

" The larkspur, painted-brush and poppy flame, 
Ay, every peeping sweet without a name, 
All, in these sunsets under foot; the hues 
Of purple and of scarlet, greens and blues, 
How have those beauties all their beauty blown 
Into one blossom, all the How'rets own 
That woke, one morn, and was a human face! " 
If Mr. Cheney's narrative only were as simple as that, the 
success of this poem would have been complete. The little vol- 
ume is beautifally printed and bound, and contains dainty illus- 
trations by Miss Isabelle Morrison. 



ALL picture frames made to order should be finished with orna- 
mented corners to cover the joints. They add much to the 
style and beauty of ready framed pictures. Cream and gold, 
white and silver, all gilt, and green and gold are the favorite 
colors in frames. "Highland Heather" is the latest tint in fine 
stationery. All tints and all grades, from the cheapest to the 
best, are sold by Sanborn, Vail & Co. They also have artists' 
materials and draughtsmen's supplies of every description. 



Abe Coleman, well-known and always popular, has returned from 
the East after an absence of ten years. During the few weeks 
which have elapsed since his return, he has carefully looked over the 
city with a view to re-establish himself in business here, and with his 
thorough knowledge of the town has made a wise decision in leasing 
the store at 1602 Market street, running through to Hayes street, in 
the St. Nicholas Hotel, where he has fitted up a high-class gentlemen's 
furnishing goods and hat establishment. Mr. Coleman was senior 
partner of Coleman Bros., the leading clothiers of this city for many 
years, and has innumerable friends and admirers to greet him in his 
new undertaking. 




'iXTUfr? 




WE COULD NOT IMPROVE W QUALITY 
if pniJ double the price It is 
the clioicosT SnwWnslobacco 
tliat experience can pmcluc* 
or fhaf money can buy 

'"^RG BROS, MltimqJ^ 



f\N 



HO. 




'S 



COATS. 



Latest styles. Can be 
worn in place of an Over- 
coat, and will keep you 
perfectly dry. 

GOODYEAR RUBBER CO, 



It II PRASE, 
Vice-President and Manager. 

5J7-E79 Market st., S. P. 

73-75 First ST., Portland, Or 




P.&B 



FRUIT DRYING PAPERS, 
BUILDING PAPERS, 
| ROOFING AND PAINTS. 



PARAFFINE PAINT CO., 116 Battery St. 

ERNST H. LAJDWIG & CO., 
The Model American Caterer. 

1206 SUTTER ST., S. F. Telephone 2388. 



Perrier-Jquet & C o. 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 

For sale by all first-class Wine Merchants and Grocers. 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast, 

133 California Street. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 20, 1894 




AN ardent Gothamite who is enjoying the hospitality of our 
beau monde is very desirous of knowing what becomes of the 
nriothers who are "suppressed*' in our society, when occasion re- 
quires a matron chez elle. The question is easily answered by 
reference to Mrs. C. W. Howard's recent pronunciamento anent 
our social features; i. e., chaperons are an unknown quantity in 
the California swim; so, of course, "impossible" parents are not 
considered necessary to be produced. 

* f * 

A young married lady who was present at a social gathering 
last week declares that Donald de V. Graham's performance of 
Jacob! in Hie Poisoned Peanut was " most as good as Clement 
Bennett's." There's fame! 

* # * 

Norman McLaren's character bit of the Jolly Tar, on the same 
occasion, showed a decided talent for that line of thing. On dit, 
Mrs. Will Tevis, who, as Miss Mabel Pacheco, made such a hit 
years ago in the amateur play produced for charity, is to be in- 
cluded in the cast of a forthcoming private affair. Mr. Hugh 
Tevis will no doubt aid, and of Miss Ella Goad's performance 
there can be but one opinion. 

Apropos of that very delightful young lady, can it be true that 
the recent abrnpt departure of a blonde family connection for the 
East, was in consequence of a whispered capture by Miss Ella of 
the bachelor son of the house of Tevis, so long accredited to the 
other young lady? 

* * * 

Among the buds of the near future, one of the most attractive 
is sweet Miss Susie Blanding, granddaughter of Mrs. Lloyd Tevis. 

Now gossips are beginning to say it is quite time Mr. McMurtry 
made up his mind to play first man at a wedding. The lady is 
constancy itself. 

* » # 

Two Misses Jones being debutantes in the swim this season 
would be rather bewildering as to identity were it not for the 
aristocratic prefix to that name adopted by each bud. 

* * * 

It is reported that those charming young ladies, the Misses 
Hobart, are meditating a musical farce-comedy in their beautiful 
ballroom in the Van Ness avenue mansion. 

* 4 * 

Why does not some one suggest Mrs. J. Downey Harvey as a 
prima donna of some of the musical affairs on the tapis for Len- 
ten diversion for the elite? Donald de V. Graham is aware of her 
vocal capabilities, and would doubtless be glad to put the idea 
into action. 

* * * 

Rumor hints that it is not unlikely, indeed quite among the 
probabilities, that the Floods may be induced to open the Califor- 
nia street abode for the final meeting of the Fortnightlys. 

* * * 

A. young South American who is paying a visit to our Mid- 
winter Fair, and being extensively entertained by the Atherton- 
Selby-Eyre faction, created much merriment the other evening 
when he said to one of the ladies of that set, "Talk about the 
Moors o f Spain— they couldn't touch the Moores of San Francisco." 

* # # 

Among the methods of amusing themselves during Lent that 
are being discussed by our belles is a suggestion for a riding class. 
The officers at the Presidio are warm supporters of the idea, and 
there are quite enough girls who ride well to make the thing a 
success, if only the mornings were a little more tempting. Some 
of the girls think the afternoon would be the better time for the 
cavalcade to start out, for that reason. 

* * * 

The domestic life reigning amongBt our << upper circles " along 
Pacific avenue and its adjacent residence streets is, to say the 
least, most edifying and — unusual. No more is the overcoat 
donned directly dinner is over; no longer the festive latch-key 
turns in the hall-door at the midnight hour. On the contrary, 
each fireside now is notable for the presence of the master of the 
house, who enjoys the pleasures of home, to the delight of the 
youngsters. Even the lively matron and the daring girl are no 
more to be seen "going it alone" on the avenue or out for a 
breath of fresh evening air! Footpadsl 

A considerable ripple has been made in social circles by the im- 
mediate and pronounced popularity of Mrs. Sussdorf, who has 
been in town only a few months and who makes her home at the 
Occidental Hotel. Her brunette beauty, her grace and refinement 
and her many accomplishments, to say nothing of her exquisite 
toilettes, have dazzled the community with their radiance. 



Society people, %past and present, are considerably exercised 
over the report that the chronicle of San Francisco from 1867 up 
to date is nearing completion, and that its early publication may 
be looked for. Its author and compiler of social statistics having 
betaken herself to New York, gives a color of truth to the rumor, 
for she always declared it would be impossible for her to bring 
out her Chronigue Scandaleuse and remain in the place. " Myl " 
said a leading social ligh\ whose honors as such date back many 
years, " what a moral earthquake that book will cause! Why, 
every house in the city has a skeleton in it, and to have them 
dragged out and brought to light is simply outrageous, far worse 
that the Sunday Supplement even." 
i # » 

" Why don't you men give a ball ? " queried a pretty heiress to 
a leading club man at a reception recently, and the query is re- 
peated over and over again by the ladies. The glorious ball once 
given by the Pacific Club in the days of our forefathers has been 
told us from childhood up by our parents, but since that event 
clubdom has retreated into its shell. There is no reason, appar- 
ently, beyond a selfish dislike of being upset by the " function," 
why the old boys should not entertain their lady friends and 
cancel some of their social indebtedness. It could be made such 
a swell affair, too. 



THE Passenger Department of the Oceanic Steamship Company 
has been removed from 327 Market Street to 138 Montgom- 
ery street, under the Occidental Hotel. 



Use Brown's Broncblal Troches for Coughs, Colds and all other 
Throat Troubles.—" Pre eminently the best."— Rev. Henry Ward Beecher. 



BURGUNDIES. 
Beaune (Red) 

Pommard t( 

Clos de Vougeot " 

CHAMBERT1N. 

Chablis (White) 

" Gold Label " 
1878 " 

In Cases, Quarts and Pints. 

CHAS. MEINECKE & CO., 

Sole Agents, 31-4 Sacramento St. 



C. MAREY &, 

LIGER-BELAIR. - 

Nulls. 



PACIFIC MINING AGENCY 
AND TRUST COMPANY. 

Irwin C. Stump, President. Wm. C. Ralston, Secretary. The Anglo- 

Californian Bank, Ld., Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS-Irwin C. Stump, Irvine M. Scott, Jacob H. Neff, W.F. 
Goad, R. C. Chambers, P. N. Lilienthal, D. M. Burns. 

MILLS BUILDING, San Francisco. 

This company has been formed to sell mining and ditch properties and 
water rights on commission only. It is prepared to act as agent and broker 
for the sale and purchase of such properties. Mines listed at its offices 
will be brought to the attention of investors; no bond is required until 
there is a prospective purchaser. 

The company will look after the interests of non-residents or obtain in- 
formation for them; it will also assist mining engineers, superintendents, 
foremen, assayers, millmen and miners to obtain employment, 

The Company is prohibited by its articles of incorporation from buying 
or selling mines on its own account, and except as agent or factor for 
others. _____ 

UNIOtTGAS AND 
GASOLINE ENGINES. 

1600 IN USE. 
For LAUNCHES, 
PRINTING OFFICES 
PUMPING 
And all purposes where power is required. 

UNION GAS ENGINE CO. 

221-223 First St., 8. F. 
Send for Catalogue. 




Jan. 20, 1894. 



pan n:\\'< isi o 



OKI of oor esteemed daily contemporanr;" has announced, in 
(be lomewbit oracular tortus of editorial judgment, ihnt (he 
situation in Italy is ■• very serious," and, by Inference, has Implied 
that the present disturbances in that country imperil tb« dynasty 
of the house of Savoy. Nothing i -mid be further from the truth 
than this. The violent outbreaks which have occurred in various 
parts of that country have been riotous demonstrations by the 
turbulent classes rather than in*urrectlonally or revolutionary 
movements. The present dynasty is not unpopular among the 
Italian people and it has no apponent; neither is there any well- 
defined yearning for a republican government. It is true that the 
recent bank scandals have crested throughout the country grave 
dissatisfaction with the existing parliamentary administration 
and the ministries by which it has been represented; hut this dis- 
satisfaction is aimed at specific agencies which form the super- 
structure of the existing system of government rather than at the 
reigning dynasty which forms its hasic principle. Added to the 
general discontent which sprang out of the bank scandals there 
is an industrial depression and lack of commercial prosperity 
which result from high taxation and a depreciated currency. By 
indirection the working masses feel this most, though, perhaps, 
they are not really the heaviest losers through it. As a natural 
consequence, this condition of affairs has bred among the work- 
ing masses a sullen, aimless feeling of insubordination to organized 
society and its general institutions of government, which finds 
expression in riotous gatherings and violent ementes. But dynas- 
tic changes do not result from causes that are so superficial. So 
far as present indications go, there is every reason to believe that 
the Prince of Naples will in due course succeed to the throne that 
is now occupied by King Humbert. 

A brilliant sample of Tory logic is to be fouDd in a recent 
paragraph in a London society journal, which opens thus: "There 
is no doubt that the prospect of an early dissolution has become 
more imminent within the past few days;" then the writer pro- 
ceeds to say: "It is freely admitted by both sides that, for the 
present at all events, the Conservatives are best prepared for the 
struggle in the constituencies. As I have already said, tbey say 
they could win without the aid of the Liberal-Unionists. And in 
London alone it is stated that the latter have increased by fifty 
per cent since the election of 1892. Now the Gladstonian cliques 
are convinced they have only one chance, and that is to keep 
■the Old Man,* as they elegantly phrase it, where he is." Now, 
if this means anything, it is an assertion that a dissolution 
of Parliament is rendered more imminent by a known and 
acknowledged condition of facts which render it morally certain 
that those whose act would cause the dissolution would 
thereby be defeated. "The Gladstonian cliques," says this 
veracious writer, "are convinced they have only one chance" 
— to avoid dissolution, and yet the prospect of their dissolving 
has become "imminent." As a matter of fact, there is not the 
slightest present prospect of a dissolution. The case of self- 
indictment against the Tory party which Mr. Gladstone appar- 
ently intends to go to the country with, is not complete as yet, 
and will not be until public indignation begins to boil at the con- 
tinuous obstruction of progressive legislation which is designed to 
effect beneficially the English, Scotch and Welsh constituencies. 
It must be admitted, however, that the Tories aeem to be doing 
their best to complete the case against themselves. They bad 
the best of Gladstone when he refused to go to the country on 
the single issue of home-rule, and bad they exercised tact in their 
treatment of the Parish Councils and Employers' Liability bills, 
they would still hold the position of vantage. As things stand, 
however, they have, by giving rein to the prejudices of tbeir 
cast in regard to matters that were comparatively trivial and 
subordinate, not only lost tbeir command of the political situa- 
tion, but are, apparently, drifting toward the rocks of popular 
resentment. 

A woman's association which was organized in Austria some 
two years ago evinces symptoms of becoming a somewhat potent 
force in the affairs of that empire. It is said to have the names 
of thousands of ladies of the wealthy middle classes of society on 
its rolls. Its aim is to promote universal suffrage throughout 
the empire, without regard to sex, station, or wealth. A meet- 
ing recently held in Vienna by the association was largely at- 
tended and very enthusiastic. The association will present a 
petition to the Reichrach asking for universal suffrage, and will 
co-operate with the Socialist Labor party in the promotion of 
everything that tends toward the securement of that condition of 
the electoral franchise. It may be said in this connection that 
the endowment of Austrian and Hungarian peasant women, who 
are commonly used like horses and oxen in pulling the plow, 
with a voice in the aPairs of State, would seem to be a rather 
radical, crude and questionable scheme. Between women within 
the plow traces and women at the ballot-box there is too wide a 
chasm to be bridged at a single effort. 



NEWS I. II hi: n 

Thrrr I. ai pr».i-nl « rlltpata bttwMn the (OTtrnmtDU ill Hrr- 
ri» anil AmlrU in ;. . rl i.nht loUrpnUUOO "f MrUln Mellon! 
ofatraatjoli rblon »»i«i« balwaan tat l« 

thai ha, shown threatening lyioplomi >>1 baoomlog n<' hut it 

will pr..b«nly be eventually idJoiMd to the latllfaotlon of the 
larger country. The (act of lb* matter la, that tin- Internal con- 
dition o| Servia Is .l..i..rate. anil that lb* country || plODgln| 
liaos every day There i. a rumor that lha paxanU 
of the young King Alexander, alarmed at the mate of the coun- 
try, have sought the protection of the I'z.ir (,,r their ion, who, in 
case of a catastrophe, i, to seek an asylum in Russia. The rumor 
is obviously false, but still the fact that it has been put In mo 
lion shows that there is an exceedingly unsettled oondltlon of 
affairs in the Ualkans. If Russia is half so anxious to bring on 
a conflict as she is represented to be by the major-generals and 
rear admirals of the daily press, she has an excellent opportunity 
in this direction. 

I'lumhlDg, Drainage aud Gas fitting In thelaleht 
QAMITADV ,l1 " 1 mosl im P rov e'l method. Fine Sanitary 
^Mlll 1 A II Y pnu-i." Mloiis for plumbing iniprove- 

'"""" menu furnished nnon application 

Kcpnlrlug of all kinds promptly attended to. 
PeraoiiAl supervision over nil work. Estimates 
given and repairing done in any part of the 

PLUMBING. " Charles E. Anderson, 

1616 Polk, near Clay. Telephone '2107. 
Br anch, 1214 Polk, iir. Sutter, Tel. 2107-2 3. F . 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Ophir Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal plaoe of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Virginia, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Twentieth day of December, 1893, an assessment, No 61, of 
Twenty five Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately, in United States Gold coin, to the 
Secretary, at the office of the company, Room 49, Nevada Block, 309 Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Saturday, the Twentieth Day of January, 1894, will be delinquent. 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 12th day of February, 1894, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 49, Nevada block, No. 309 Montgomery Btreet, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Confidence Silver Mining Company 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 28th day of December. 1893, an assessment (No. 24) of twenty-five cts. 
per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United Slates gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, 414 California street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock.upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the Thirtieth Day of January, 1 894, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore will be sold on TUESDAY, the 20ih day of February, 1894, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses of 
sale. By order of the Board of Directors. A. S. GROTH, Secretary. 

Office— 414 California street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Kentuek Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 8 

A mount per Share 10 cents 

Levied Dec. 20,1893 

Delinquent in Office Jau. 24, 18S4 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock Feb. 15,1894 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. - 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 13 

Amount per Share 10 cents 

Levied January 16, 1894 

Delinquent in Office February 19, 1894 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock March 14, 1894 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
C alifornia. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 106. 

Amount per Share 25cents 

Levied January 17 1894 

Delinquent in Office February 20, 1891 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock March 12, 1894 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, No. 3:9 Montgomery Street, San Francis- 
co, California. 

ANNUAL MEETING- 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Oceanic Steam- 
ship Company will be held at theoffi.ee of the company, 327 Market St., 
San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday, the 22d Day of January, 1 894, at the hour of 1 1 o'clock A. M., 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year aud the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on THURSDAY. January llth, 1894, 
at 3 o'clock p. m. E. H.SHELDON, Secretary 

Office— 327 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 20, 1894. 




Oomstock The week ended to-day has deen unusually quiet 
Mining on Pine street, with the market drooping under 

Stjares, a lack, of business on the bull side of the house. The 
bears have figured to a larger extent on account sales, and some 
of these enterprising speculators must now have out a line of 
shorts representing an amount of money which they would hardly 
dare to calculate for fear of giving their nerves a shock which 
might prove disaetious. It is certain, however, that a quick op- 
ward turn would line the street with a number of financial 
wrecks, so heavy has been the plunging of late on small capital. 
There has been nothing to warrant such a pronounced bear move- 
ment, unless it be that the proverb has been reversed to << no 
news is bad news " to suit the occasion. As a matter of fact, 
there has been no unfavorable change of late in the condition of 
the Con. Cal- Virginia mine, which is the key to the situation at 
present. The work of driving the drift, under direction of Mr. 
Rule, to locate the ore body which he claims exists, has been 
prosecuted with all the energy that could be desired. The posi- 
tion as it is to-day is far more satisfactory than it was some 
weeks ago, when his supporters, who, strange to say, are now the 
chief antagonists of the scheme, were urging the merits of the 
stock as an investment at $6 per share. Blowing hot one minute 
and cold the next is a little pastime indulged in on Pine street by 
some accepted authorities, but the game is rather disastrous for 
those who follow the blind lead. There are many who believe 
that ore will eventually be found in the Rule drift, and the nat- 
ural assumption is that the strike will help the market out of a 
rut. It is hardly the time for a display of any jealousy among 
the mining interests. An ore discovery will give a new lease of 
life to the Oomstock lode, aud every one interested in its future 
should hope that good luck will attend the present explorations, 
independent of who may have the credit for the ultimate discov- 
ery. Considerable activity is noted at the south end of the lode, 
and strenuous efforts are being made by the different companies 
at work there, to put the mines on a self-sustaining basis as far 
as possible. Some ore is being taken out of the middle mines, 
enough to keep tbe mills in operation ; and in one or two instances 
an improvement is noted in the grade of the ore. The annual 
meeting of Sierra Neva/la was held during the week, and the old 
officers were re-elected with the exception of Superintendent. 
Roger Prendergast, a well-Known and capable mining man, was 
appointed to the position, on the resignation of Archie McDon- 
nell, who so creditably filled it for years. An assessment of 
twenty-five cents was levied by this company during the week, 
and one of ten cents on Occidental Con. 

$$$ 

THERE is a better demand reported for California mines, and it 
is pleasant to be able to state that in many cases the intend- 
ing investors are people in this city, who recognize that tbe only 
avenue open to acquire any degree of wealth with a comparative 
certainty is from an increase of the home gold production. Any 
favorable prospect in the way of a gold mine can now be pre- 
sented to merchants and others without the danger of being snub- 
bed, and the money to carry on work has been forthcoming on 
more than one occasion recently. 

I $ $ 
rfnnual The annual report of John J. Valentine, Presi- 

fyineral dent of Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Express, which ap- 
Production, pears in this issue of the News Letter, places the 
production of the precious metals of the States and Terri- 
tories west of the Missouri river, including British Columbia, at 
$104,081,591, of which $34,202,691 was in gold, $38,491,521 in sil- 
ver, $23,631,339 in copper, and $7,750,040 was in lead. California 
is credited with $13,096,948; Nevada, $3,503,051; Oregon, $1,263,- 
639; Washington, $403,405; Alaska, $918,245; Idaho, $4,031,140; 
Montana, $32,380,500; Utah, $8,936,864; Colorado, $27,477,535; 
New Mexico, $1,612,885; Arizona, $7,390,410; Dakota, $2,498,- 
000; Texas, $315,000; British Columbia, $253,968. The exports 
of silver during the past year to Japan, China, the Straits, etc., 
have been as follows: From London, $55,973,825; from San 
Francisco, $11,741,660. The report shows the product of gold 
and silver in Mexico from 1877 to 1893 to have been $16,514,000 
in gold and $552,895,000 in silver. 

$ $ $ 

THE annual meeting of the Mutual Savings Bank of San Fran- 
cisco was held on Tuesday last, and the following officers were 
elected to serve for the ensuing year: James G. Fair, president ; 
James D. Phelan and S. G. Murphy, vice presidents; James A. 
Moffitt, John A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, Charles Cadwalader, 
Frank J. Sullivan and L. Drexler, directors. George A. Story 
was re-elected cashier. This bank has already resumed loaning 
money on real estate, being one of the first to lend after the new 
year. 



California The business transacted by tbe insurance compa- 
(nsurance nies in this State during the past year shows a de- 
ffeturqs, crease of $8861 in comparison with the amount of 
insurance written in 1892. The amount of losses paid was also 
less by $48,659 than during tbe previous year. The annual report 
of the State Insurance Commissioner, when filed, willshow trans- 
actions for the year 1893 as iollows: California companies — 
Amount written, $42,062,967; premiums on same, $740,927 76; 
losses paid, $287,276 18; ratio of losses to premiums, 38.8. Com- 
panies uf other States — Amount written, $137,637,435; premium 
onsame, $2,538,643 94; losses paid, $1,073,367 75; ratio of losses 
to premiums, 42 3. Companies of foreign countries — Amount 
written, $208,772 101; premiums on same, $3 500,882 23; losses 
paid, $1,306,515 91; ratio of losses to premiums, 37.3. Total 
amounts written, $388,522,503; total premiumpaid, $6,780,453 93; 
total losses paid, $2,667,160 24; total ratio of losses to premiums, 
39.4. The ratio of losses to premiums shows an increase of a half 
of 1 per cent, compared with tbe returns of 1892, and a decrease 
of 4.3 per cent, compared with those of 1890. 



Iqsurance The annual election of tbe Fireman's Fund Insur- 
Gomparjy ance Company took place during the week. The 
Elections, old Board of Directors was re-elected to serve tbe 
coming year, as follows; D.J. Staples, John O. Earl, John Bar- 
ton, John H. Gardiner, John T. Wright, Thomas S. Chard, W. H. 
Brown, F. W. Langee, J. C. Coleman, John Bermingbam, and 
William J. Dutton. The Fireman's Fund is one of the few local 
companies which have not only held their own during the past 
year, but made money. The gross assets for the year are $3,111,- 
490, against $3,037,707 for 1893; the re-insurance reserve, $1,143, 
458, against $l,lsl,475, and tbe net surplus, $733,068, against 
$680,974 last year. The immense strides which this well-known 
company has made in public favor can be realized from a com- 
parison of the figures of to-day with those of 1880, when the 
gross assets were only $741,488, the re-insurance reserve $244,654, 
and the net surplus $153,172. D. J. Staples was re-elected Presi- 
dent, W. J. Dutton, Vice President, and Bernard Faymonville, 
Secretary. 

$ $ $ 

The ttaqover A circular, issued by the Hartford Fire Insur- 
Stili in ance Company, which recently acquired the right 
th_e Field, to use the name of the New York Underwriters 
Agency, has proved very misleading in regard to the position of 
the Hanover Fire Insurance Company in this city. The Under- 
writers' Agency was originally composed of the Hanover and 
Citizens Companies, of New York, and when the change took 
place, all that the Hartford obtained, so far as the former com- 
pany is concerned, was the name. The Hanover will continue 
in business on the Pacific Coast as usual, under the management 
of Cesar Bertheau, who has for years past been the local represen- 
tative of the company. The Germania Fjre Insurance Company 
of New York has also been removed to the same office, the man- 
agement of which retains the confidence of all the heavy insurers 
on the eoast. John F. Siebe and Martin Raschen are the city 
agents. 

$ $ $ 
rf Good The annual meeting of the San Francisco Gaslight 
Financial Company was held during tbe week. There was a 
Showing, large representation of stockholders, and tbe pro- 
ceedings were most harmonious from beginning to end. The 
President in his annual report referred to tbe steady growth of 
the company's interests and the development of the business. 
The Secretary's report showed that the number of consumers 
is now 24,875, and the assets of the company, allowing for an 
indebtedness of $812,759, were placed at $7,968,458. The follow- 
ing Board of Directors was elected for the ensuing year: Adam 
Grant, Joseph B. Crockett, Levi Strauss, George W. Prescott, 
Daniel T. Murphy, A. H. Payson and J. Downey Harvey. 
Joseph B. Crockett was re-elected President, and W. G. Barrett 
Secretary. 

$ $ $ 

AT the annual meeting of the Sun Insurance Company, which 
has just been held, the following officers and directors were 
elected to serve for the ensuing year: C. L. Taylor, president; J. 
N. Knowles, vice-president; J. R. Kelly, I. Steinhart, R. 1). 
Chandler, A. Barstow, Sol. Wangenheim, W. G. Hall, J. J. Mc- 
Kinnon and J. D. Phelan directors. W. H. Friend was elected 
secretary and J. Stevenson Smith assistant secretary. Tbe usual 
quarterly dividend of 10 per cent, was declared payable imme- 
diately. 

$ $ $ 

AT the recent annual meeting of the California Insurance Com- 
pany, the following directors were elected to serve for the 
ensuingyear: S. C. Bigelow, John Bermingham, L. L. Bromwell, 
W. J. Bryan, Daniel Meyer, M. A. Newel, John R. Spring, A. W. 
Scholle and H. L. Simon. This company, which is now in liquid- 
ation, has already returned $50 per share, or $300,000 to its share- 
holders, with about $390,000, or $65 per share, still on hand to be 
distributed at the discretion of the directors. 



Jan. 20, 1394. 



s\\ ll;\\« [» NEWS ill 11 B 



18 




" Hear the Crier' " '• \\ bat ;he deril art thou" * 
"One that will pIit tbe devil. »ir. with you." 



THK Pipe laughed long, lill its eyes were wet, 
As it said to the giddy young Cigarette: 
■* Your lime is come, your grave I* made; 
You can't stand up against this crusade, 
And they'll bury you deep, and put you to sleep, 
Where the clay is cold ami the worms do creep! 1 ' 

The Cigarette said, with a toaa of its bead: 
" Don't believe it, my daisy ; I'm not yet dead, 
But the liveliest thing yon e'er saw, instead. 
You are a creature of barrooms and snipes, 
And every lady, you kuow, hates pipes. 
Y'ou're English, of course: but that doesn't do here — 
Get back to your haunts and your pewter of beer." 

Tbe Pipe smiled blandly in courteous scorn: 
*' I flourished, you dudelet. before you were born. 
My ancestor rested in Kaleigh's lips, 
I was held fast in Sydney's finger tips. 
J'ou're a thing of to-day, and your hnur is nigh — 
Get out of tbat package, and go and die." 

The Cigarette whistled a popular tune, 
And sneered at the pipe all mellow and brune : 
" My life is safer than yours, I ween. 
You're a nasty furnace of nicotine, 
Because tbe ladies constantly sigh 
To smoke me, cully, upon the sly. 
When tbe crusade thickens I won't go far, 
For I'll a sanctuary find in the boudoir." 

THE folding-bed has again asserted its position as a coadjutor 
of the deadly dummy. As an excommunicator of human 
lives, it holds its own in a manner peculiar to the alligator, the 
python, and all others of their tastes. Having a grudge against 
a person, it immeaiately closes in upon them just as the monsters 
of the tropics swallow one whole. Once inside an alligator or a 
python, one can feel his way about, and, probably, while the 
monster is sleeping, escape from his in'ards unnoticed. But once 
inside a folding-bed one is doomed. The er — er oh, what do you 
call them, now? The er — oh, yes, Supervisors! (strange that we 
had forgotten they were still in existence) who put guards on the 
cable cars, policemen in the Chinese quarter, and a tax on street 
flirting, ought to put muzzles on the folding-beds. 

A FEATURE of Ireland's day at the Fair should be an exhi- 
bition of the old doings at Donnybrook before Pat learned the 
use of the pistol and knife, and relied solely opon the honest 
blackthorn. Among those gentlemen who are attending to the 
" Irish Day" celebration are not a few who understand the use 
of the stick. Mr. Welsh, now foreman of tbe Grand Jury, can 
twirl a "tippeen" with skill and dexterity; Judge Cooney can 
exhibit honorable scars upon his scalp, and Colonel Tom Barry 
can feint under the elbow and drop his foe with a mighty upper 
cut. These gentlemen, attired in the national costume, would 
make the Irish celebration a glittering and immortal success if 
they exhibited their skill with the " shilelagh." 

WE have received copies of a small Eastern publication entitled 
Woman's World. In it is a column or so headed, "John 
Chinaman and Women's Wages." In the article the writer says: 
"It is almost respectable to be a lawyer or plumber. It is a 
crime to be a woman." From both these propositions we 
respectfully dissent. We have never regarded it criminal to be a 
woman, although we deem it unnecessary and very inconvenient. 
We regard it as an error, but more of tbe head than of the heart. 
But If it be a sin we openly rejoice that so large a proportion of 
the race are prone to that species of transgression. It makes 
things lively for the rest of us. 

THE very latest phase of tbe Hawaiian muddle is a civil suit 
instituted by the ex-Queen against the Government of the 
United States, in which she is said to claim damages for the loss 
of a throne, or, to put it in plainer terms, sells tbe Hawaiian 
Islands, throne, scepter and all, for $3,000,000, abdicates, and 
allows the American eagle to take the perch. Liliuokalani, it is 
rumored, proposes, when she has got her bonus, to build a med- 
ieval castle at Sausaiito, where she and a coterie of more or less 
tropical spirits can listen to the plash of the waves, drink cham- 
pagne, and mock the irony of fate, and curse the '• missionary 
man." 

SAN FRANCISCAN8 have received with undisguised pleasure 
tbe information imparted by " Maud Nelson " Fair that she 
has reformed Charlie, and are now waiting in breathless suspense 
to hear from Charlie that he has reformed her. 



MM. IK i . \rrK. who used to write poetry for the 
alone with M • Lillian Pluokett, "Analrh." Uln Joule 
Plffftow and other irdtttts, u atlll In the field. When 

the t'-tll we* presented with a new managing editor some •tftbtein 
montba ago. Miss Platte and her litter* were ioglorlonilj dis- 
charged anrl forced to And pwtaroa new. Port long time the 
■ i:ifi: lost nil tra.-k of these literary ladles, wboie HTuslons 
used lo till biro with n gentle, soft and Somewhat alicky regard 
for an. The other day we were looking over some exchanges 
from Northern California, and In one we found a poem by Miss 
Plane. It was written in that lady's usual excellent style, and 
wound up with the ("Mowing remarkable couplet: 

" Lei me on ■ oomel glide. 
And also on a dog-star ride." 
If tbe lady will pardon us, we will tell her that this arrange- 
ment la inadequate. It i* all very well for some philosopher, 
whose pulse is beating low, to look forward to a celestial habita- 
tion which has been properly cooled. And then it is a little puz- 
zling, and perhaps a trirling preposterous, to think bow Miss 
Platte can simultaneously inhabit a comet and a dog-star. We 
should bate to witness such a horrible distribution of her charm- 
ing person or of her logic, which really draws us to tbe conclu- 
sion tbat, if her belief is well founded, the one may hope to wan- 
der pleasantly with Jekyll and the other dance merrily with 
Hyde. 

A YOUNG lady who aspires to histrionic honors writes, asking 
that we give her full advice and direction as to her exact 
course. As a newspaperman would rather die the death of an 
ant under tbe wheels of a locomotive than appear to know every- 
thing and a little over, we hasten to her aid. In the first place it 
will be necessary to purchase about twenty-five gorgeous dresses. 
These can be paid for out of the first week's profits as a star. 
The next step is to get some one who writes weather reports for 
tbe daily papers and have him dramatize the latest novel. A story 
with plenty of seduction and unlimited sniveling would be the 
best. After this it would be a good plan to take late champagne 
suppers with newspaper critics, and see that the critics do not 
pay for them. Then it would not be unwise to walk along 
Kearny and Market streets every afternoon with a certain rigidity 
of gait, such as would be adopted by a man who would claim to 
have lost his money in a broken bank. This is all we can think 
of off-hand, but it might be well to study for a week or two, if 
there is lime, otherwise it does not matter much. Tbe result will 
be precisely the same, and tbe dresses, which are the chief item, 
will wear just as well in private life. 

ANOTHER book of verses, written by a very brainy woman, has 
been thrown upon the market. It is entitled " In Our 
World," and is the work of Mrs. Charlotte Perkins Stetson. In 
one part of tbe volume is a skittish poem entitled "Feminine 
Vanity," which we read through. The last stanza is as follows: 
" We pad and stuff — 1 Our man looks bolder! 
Don't speak of the time when a bran-filled bunch 
Made an English gentleman look like Punch — 
But feel of his shoulderl" 
This is bad advice, very bad advice, dear Mrs. Stetson. Now, 
we should no more think of asking a person to feel of a society 
man's shoulder than to applaud of your wit. But, as the Stock- 
ton Mail innocently says, in referring to the verses, " Nobody 
under any circumstances would suspect that a man wrote them." 

THE Soldier's Home is about the stormiest institution in the 
State. One would imagine that after the perils and fatigues 
of the late unpleasantness, these battle-scarred veterans would 
settle down to a mild life, and bid adieu to discord. But this is 
not so. When some trusted official is not robbing them, they are 
raising a racket among themselves, and keeping the reporters of 
the press busy writing them up. They have the American flag 
proudly displayed at tbat building, but a flag of truce is an un- 
known signal. It is war, and war all the time. 

THAT a traffic in opium should be carried on between the pris- 
oners in the State Prison is no more astonishing than the fact 
that tbere are actually prisoners in the State Prison to carry it on. 
It ia cheering to reflect that although California does not capture 
its bandits or hang its murderers, it does occasionally punish a 
burglar or a horse-thief. 

THIS world is but a vale of woes, 
As fate has always shown — ■ 
And with the prettieBt girl there goes 
The smartest chaperone. 

WE are proud to say that we have many friends in this world, 
but the man who asked us if we were superstitious the 
other day, and when we answered "No," said that he would like 
to borrow $13, is no friend at all. 

THE paradox of paradoxes is that in the marriage ceremony 
the woman doesn't get in any more talk than the man. 

O wonder a young man has a bard time coaxing his mustache, 
when it is down on his lip from the very first. 



N 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 20, 1894. 



JOHN J. Valentine, President, San Francisco. 
George E. GRAY. First Vice-President, San Francisco. 
DUDLEY EVANS, Second Vice-President, New York. 
James HERON, Secretary, San Francisco. 
H. B. PARSONS, Assistant Secretary, New York. 
HOMER S. KING, Treasurer, San Francisco. 



Office of the President. 



Saw eFKcwtciaco, ^Decew-t&e* 30, 1S93. 



DEAR Sir : The following is our Annual Report of Precious Metals produced in the States and Territories west of the 
Missouri River (including British Columbia) during 1S93, which shows in the aggregate : Gold, $34,202,691; Silver, $38,491,521; 
Copper, $23,631,339; Lead, $7,756,040. Total gross result, $104,081,591. The "commercial" value at which the several 
metals named herein have been estimated, is : Silver, 74 cts. per oz.; Copper, 10 cts. per lb.; and Lead, $3.50 per cwt. 

As in former reports, allowance must be made for probable variations from exact figures, by reason of constantly 
increasing facilities for transporting bullion, ores and base metals from the mines outside of the express and the difficulty of 
getting entirely reliable data from private sources. Estimates obtained in this way are liable to be exaggerated and are, to a 
considerable degree, guess work ; but with some modifications on this account, made herein, the general results reached, 
while only approximately correct, may be accepted as the closest approximation possible under the circumstances. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 


Gold Dust and Bul- 
lion by Express. 


Gold Dust and 

Bullion by Other 

Conveyances. 


Silver Bullion 
by Express. 


Ores and Ease 
Bullion by Freight. 


Total. 




$9,697,036 
1,418,603 

1,076,977 
249.553 


$1,475,000 


$ 257,005 

1,236,869 

111,662 

128,852 


$1,667,907 
847,579 


$13,096,948 




3.503,051 




75,000 

25,000 

918,246 


1,263,639 






403,405 






918,246 




1,645,000 
3,100,500 

377,352 
7,229,643 

302,541 

I,oS2,348 
2,283,000 


1.481,973 

10,730,000 

1,041,115 

16,369,257 

207, S57 

224,769 

200,000 

315,000 


904,167 

18,550,000 

7,5i8,397 

3.878,635 

977,487 

5.858,293 

15,000 


4,031,140 






32,380,500 






8,936,864 




125,000 
225,000 


27.477-535 




1,612,885 




7,390,410 




2,49s, 000 






31^,000 




253.968 






253.968 












Total 


$28,716,521 


$2,843,246 


$32,304,359 


$40,217,465 


$104,08:;, 591 







The gross yield for 1893, shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows : 

Gold 321V0- $34,202,691 

Silver 36^ 38,491,521 

Copper 22t% 23,631,339 

Lead 7/^ 7.756,040 

Total $104,081,591 



ANNUAL PRODUCTS OF LEAD, COPPER, SILVER AND GOLD IN THE STATES AND TERRITORIES WEST OF THE MISSOURI RIVER 


1870-1893. 




Production as per W. F. 




The Net Products of the States and Territories West of the Missouri River, exclusive 


Year. 


& Co's Statements, 

including amounts from 

British Columbia and 


deducting Amounts 
from British 


of British Columbia and West Coast of Mexico, divided, are as follows : 












Mexico. 


Coast of Mexico. 


LEAD. 


COPPER. 


SILVER. 


COLD. 


1S70 

1871 


$ 54,000,000 
58, 284,000 


$ 52,150,000 
55,7S4,O0O 


$ I,oSo,000 
2,100,000 




$17,320,000 
i9,2S6,ooo 






34,398,000 


1872 

1S73 


62,236,959 
72,258,693 


60,351,824 
70,139,860 


2,250,000 
3,450,000 




19,924.429 
27.4S3.302 


3S,I77,395 
39,206,558 




1874 

1875 

1S76 

1877 

1S7S 

1S79 

1SS0 


74,401,045 

8o,SS9,o57 
90,875,173 

98,421.754 
81,154,622 

75.349.5tf* 
80,167,936 


71,965,610 
76,703,433 
S7,2i 9 ,S59 
95,81 1, 5S2 
78,276, 167 
72,6S8,SSS 
77,232,512 


3,Soo,ooo 
5,100,000 
5,040,000 
5,085,250 
3,452,000 
4,185,769 
5,742,390 




29-699,122 

3 1 . 635,239 
39,292,924 
45.S46.109 
37,24s, 137 

37.032,857 
3S.033.055 


38,466,488 




39,96S, 194 
42,SS6,935 
44,880,223 












$ 898,000 


32,559.067 


1SS1 


S4.504.417 


81,198,474 


6,361,902 


1,195,000 


42,987.613 


30.653,959 


1SS2 


92,4",S35 


S9.207.549 


S,ooS,i55 


4,055.037 


48. 133.039 


2901 1,31s 


18S3 


90,313.612 


84, 639,212 


8,163.550 


5.6S3.921 


42,975,101 


27.S16.640 


1SS4 


S4.975.954 


81,633,835 


6,834,091 


6,oS6,252 


43,529.925 


25,183,567 


18S5 


90,181,260 


87,3",382 


8,562,991 


7.S3S,o 3 6 


44.516,599 


26,393,756 


1SS6 


103,011.761 


100,160,222 


9,185,192 


9.276,755 


52,136 S51 


29,561,424 


1SS7 


104,645,959 


103,327,770 


9,631.073 


10,362,746 


50,833,884 


32,500,067 


iSSS 


"4,341,592 


112 665,569 


11,263,630 


iS, 261, 490 


53.152 747 


29,987,702 


ISS9 


127,677,836 


126.723.3S4 ■ 


14,593,323 


14,793,763 


64,808,637 


32,527.661 


1890 


127,166,410 


126,804,855 


n,509.57i 


20,569,092 


62.930.S31 


31.795.361 


1S9I 


118,237,441 


117,946,565 


12,385,780 


13,261,663 


60,614.004 


31,685,118 


IS92 


111,531,700 


111,259,508 


11.433,947 


I9.370.5>6 


50,607,601 


29.S47.444 


IS93 


104,081,591 


103,827,623 


7,756,040 


23.631,339 


38,491,521 


33 948,723 



The exports of Silver during the past year to Japan, China, the Straits, etc.. have been as follows : From London, 
$55,973,825 ; from San Francisco, $11,741,660. Total, $67,715,485, as against $67,342,524 last year. Pounds Sterling estimated 
at $4.84. 



Wtiitob States of 9Hc 



.vice 



unsavratxTBiunn T01S9J. 






18S5-1886. 

1S86- 

i8S7-rSSS . 

iSSS- 

1SS9-1890. 

1890-1891. 

1S91- 

1S92-1893. 

Total . 



I :.oco 
SSi.ooo 
942,000 

1,013.000 

93T.OOO 
956.000 

1. "55.000 
914,000 

1,026,000 

1,047,000 
1.000 

1.040.000 

I.IO^.OOO 
I. T 50.OCO 
1,275.000 
I.40O.0CO 









516,514,000 



I.OOO 

33,226,000 

34,112,000 

■l.OOO 

34.<> : 

40.706,000 

41,5 0,000 

43,000,000 

45.750,000 

48,500,000 



$552,S95,ooo 



■'..000 

r7.M2.000 
17.000 

' -''.COO 

•5.000 

3^,7 ; 
: ;o.ooo 
1 s.ooo 
35,647.000 
35.943.000 
4i,746,oco 
42,600,000 
4.1,150,000 
47,025,000 
49.900,000 



$569,409,000 



EXHIBIT OF COINAGE OF GOLD, SILVER AND COPPER, IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, FROM THE 1st OF JULY, 1873, TO THE 

30th OF JUNE, 1S93. 



1873-1S74. 

1S74-1S75. 
1S75-1S76. 
1876-1S77. 
1S77-1S7S. 
1S78-1S79. 
1879-1SS0. 
1880-1S81. 
18S1-1SS2. 
1SS2-1SS3. 
1SS3-1SS4. 
1SS4-1SS5. 
18S5-18S6. 
1SS6-1SS7. 
1887-18S8. 
1888-1S89. 
18S9-1S90. 
1S90-1S91. 
1S91-1S92. 
1892-1893. 

Total. 



Gold Dollars. 



|866,743 
862,619 
809,401 
695,750 
691.998 
65S,2o6 
521,826 
492,068 

452,590 
407,600 
328,69s 
423,250 
425,000 
410,000 
340,320 
305,100 
243,298 
308,000 
291,940 
361,672 



19,896,079 



Silver Dollars. 



$iS,S46,o67 
19.386,958 
19,454,054 
21,415,1:0 
22,084,203 
22, 162,987 
24,018,528 
24,617,395 
25,146,260 
24,083,921 

25.377,379 
25,840,728 
25,850,000 
25,600,000 
26,711,000 
25,274,500 
24.32S.326 
24,238,000 
25,527,000 
27,169,876 



$477,132,310 



Copper Dollars. 



$15,966 
21,712 
30,654 
9,035 
41,364 
16,300 

14,035 
42,258 
11,972 



$203,296 



Summary. — Totals: Gold, $9,896,079; Silver, $477,132,310; Copper, $203,296. Grand Total, $487,231,685. 



EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF MEXICO PROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINTS IN 1537 TO THE END OF THE 

FISCAL YEAR OF 1S93. 



Colonial Epoch. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Copper. 


TOTAL. 




$ 8,497,950 
19,889,014 
40, 39 1, 447 


$752,067,456 
441,629,211 
888,563,989 


$200,000 
342,893 


$760,765,406 
461,518,225 
929,298,329 


Independence. 


$68,778,411 


$2,082,260,656 


$542,893 


$2,151,581,960 




$ 557,392 
45,040,628 


$ iS,575,569 
740,246,485 


$5,235,177 


19,132,961 
790,522,290 


Republic. 


$45,59 s , 20 


$758,822,054 


$5,235,177 


$809,655,251 


Eagle coin, from 1st July, 1873, to 30th of June, 1893.. 


$ 9,896,079 


$477,I32,3'0 


$203,296 


$487,231,685 



SUMMARY. 

Colonial Epoch— from 1537 to 1821, $2,151,581,960; Independence— from 1822 to 1873, $809,655,251 ; Republic— from 
1S73 to 1893, $487,231,685. Total, $3,448,468,896. . . 

The returns from Mexico continue to show a steady forward movement, m full accord with the healthy progress of 
mineral developments and mining interests in the United States. 







President. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO 



NEWS LETTER 
* 



Jan. 20, 1894. 




b-a_3>tk:s. 



SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour is steady; Extras, $3.4)@fS.5Q. SuperBne, ?2.40@$2.60. 

Wheat is light; Shipping, $1.07; Milling, $1.08'$$M0 per cental. 

Barley is slack; Brewing, S2 1 ^c.@92Uc. Peed, 70c.@75c. per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, (1.12311.20; Feed, $1.05^(1.10 per ctl. 

Corn, White, 95c; Yellow, 00c. @95c. per ctl. 

Rye is quiet, fair demand, (L.02^, Cement, (2. 00@(2.25 

Hay Is steady; Wheat, $10@I14; Oats, (10@(12; Alfalfa, ?8@(10. 

Millstuffs, good demand. Bran, (1(5@(17 per ton. 

Beans, light request, $1.65@?2.10 per ctl. Potatoes, 4 )c.@75c. per ctl. 

Butter is lower; Choice, 2-3c.@30c. ; Fair, 17c.@18c. 

Cheese, light stock, 10c.@l3c. Eggs, free supply, 35c.@40c. 

Honey, Comb, 10c.@12c; Extracted, 4c.(§>5c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth $l.25@(l 40. Beeswax is steady, at 22c.@23c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Hides are steady; Dry, 5c.@6c. Wool is in light demand at 7c.@12c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 7J4e. 

Coffee sluggish at21c.@22c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is plentiful ; large stock. Nuts find ready sale. Hops, 16c.@18c. 

Quicksilver is nominal at (30 per flask. 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws and Refined. White, 4%c@lfiG. 

Since our last issue the State bag been visited with a copious 
rainfall, that has been of great benefit to the agriculturist, and 
gives us assurance of a prosperous season, thus enabling the 
tillers of the soil to plow and sow their grain, in confidence of a 
generous harvest in due season. 

The steamship Mariposa, hence for the Colonies, via Honolulu, 
on the 13th inst., had for cargo to Australia Mdse. value $5-4,150; 
for New Zealand, value $10,020; for Honolulu, value $29,630; for 
Samoa, value $2330, and to the Fiji Islands, $492. The ship- 
ments to the Colonies include 4660 cs. Salmon, 73 bbls. and 851 
half-bbls. same, 30,507 lbs. Borax, 467 bales Broom Corn, 375 cs. 
Canned Goods, etc.; to Honolulu, 1707 lbs. Cheese, Codfish, 
Wioe, etc.; for Samoan Islands, Lumber, Rice, etc.; to Figi, 139 
cs. Salmon and Canned Goods. 

For Honolulu, bark R. P. Rither, hence on the 13th inst., car- 
ried 725 bbls. Flour, 2000 sks. Bran, 1514 bales Hay, Oats, Bar- 
ley, etc., value $11,925. 

The steamship Progress, hence for Panama and way ports, of 
the N. A. N. Co., sailed hence with a full cargo for New York, 
consisting in part of Mdse. of the value of $75,000. The leading 
items were ll'.OOO galls. Wine, 3113 galls. Brandy, 1360 cs. Canned 
Goods, 25,000 lbs. Mustard Seed, 213 bales Rags, 8513 cs. Salmon, 
400,000 lbs. Beans, etc. ; to Hamburg, 5787 lbs. Bees Wax, 100 
cs. Canned Goods, etc., value $2125; tor Rotterdam, 263 galls. 
Wine; also, for Central America, 10,257 lbs. Blue Stone, 1600 
kegs Powder, 18,175 lbs. Rice, 3298 bbls. Floor, 20 M. lbs. Salt- 
petre, 3024 lbs. Lard, 30 M. feet Lumber, 37,735 lbs. Beans, etc., 
value $47,632; for Panama, 2700 galls. Wine, 200 coils Wire, etc., 
value $1458. 

Treasure for Honolulu. — The stmr. Mariposa, hence on the 
13th inst., $184; of this $150 was in currency, the rest in coin. 

The Irmgard, from Honolulu, had for cargo 19,168 bags Sugar, 
etc.; the S. C. Allen, from same, 19,500 bags ditto. 

The Orient— The P. M. 8. 8. City of Peking, 29 days from 
Hongkong, via Yokohama and Honolulu, had for cargo 25,659 
mats Rice, 1080 pkgs. Tea, 996 pkgs. Oil, 2245 bxs. Japanese 
Oranges, 3740 bags Sugar, 1300 pkgs. Sauce, 787 rolls Matting, 405 
bags Cotfee and 3500 pkgs. Mdse.; to go Overland, 2913 pkgs. 
Tea, 781 pkgs. Raw Silk, 27 pkgs. Silk Goods, 3182 rolls Mat- 
ting, etc.; for Central and South America, 23 pkgs. Raw Silk and 
75 pkgs. Mdse. 

Grain Charters. — The Br. ship "Verbena, 1719 tons, now on the 
Sound, Wheat from Tacorna to U. K-, Havre. Antwerp or Dun- 
kirk, £1 12s. 6d. net.; Br. ship Springburn, 2500 tons, Wheat and 
Mdse. to London direct. 

The Br. steamer Miowera, Captain Stott, 11 J days from Hono- 
lulu, has gone up to the Union Iron Works for needed repairs. 

Tahiti. — The bkte. City of Pepeeta, thence, had for cargo 112 
bales Cotton, 50,000 Cocoauuts fc 50 tins dessicated ditto, 47i tons 
Shells, etc. 

Honolulu. — Bkte. Wrestler, 25 days thence, had for cargo 
14,198 bags Sugar; J, C. Pfiuger had 24,327 bags same; Alden 
Besse had 16909 bags Sugar and 3355 bags Rice; S. N. Castle has 
13,996 bags Sugar; Geo. C. Perkins, from same, had 10,188 bags 
Sugar, and the Olga, from Mahukona, had 13,994 bags Island 
Sugar. 

FACIAL BLEMISHES. 

The largest lustltution in the 
world for the treatment of the 
\ Skin, Scalp, Nerves and Blood, 
I removal of Moles, Warts, Plm- 
I pies. Freckles, Tan, Red veins, 
3 Superfluous Hair, Powder and 
; ; Birth Marks, and all Skin tmper- 
'fectlons. 20 years practical 
experience, Inventor of Wood- 
bury's Facial Soap for the 
complexion. For sale at all 
Druggists. Send 10c. for Sam- 
ple Size Cake anrf ISO nHLte Book. Illustrated. 
JOHN H. WOODBURY, Dermatologist, 
Consultation free. 125 West 42d »l., N. Y. 




SAN FRANCISCO SAVIN6S UNION. 

Northeast Corner California and Sansome Streets, 

Formerly Occupied by Bank of Wells, Fargo & Co. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, Jnne 30, 1893 $28,058,691 OO 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,099,434 OO 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, .fresiaent; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas, 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland ; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge Ib made 
for pasB book or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST CO. 

Paid-up Capital, $1,000,000. 

Corner Montgomery and California Streets, San Francisco. 

J. D. FRY, President ... HENRY WILLIAMS, Vice-President 

J. Dalzell Brown. Secretary and 'treasurer. 

This company is authorized by law to ace as Executor, Administrator, 
Assignee, Receiver or Trustee. It is a legal depositary for Court and Trust 
Funds. Will take entire charge of Real and Personal Estates, collecting 
the income and profits, and attending to all such details as an individual 
in like capacity could do. 

Acts as Registrar and Transfer Agent of all Stocks and Bonds. 

Receives deposits subject to check and allows interest at the rate of two 
per cent per annum on daily balances. Issues certificates of deposits 
bearing fixed rates of interest. 

Receives deposits in its savings department from $1 upwards, and allows 
the usual rates of interest thereon. 

The rate of interest on Term Deposits for six months, ending June 30, 
1893, was at 5 per cent per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits 4 1-6 per 
cent per annum. 

KK.NTS SAFES inside its burglar-proof vaults at prices from $5 per 
annum upwards, according to size. Valuables of all kinds may be stored 

WILLS DRAWN AND TAKEN CARE OF WITHOUT CHARGE. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 7,390,000 

Southeastcorner Bush and Sansome Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE 60 LOMBARD 8TREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nanaimo, 
and Nelson— British Oolumbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Tacoma, 
Washington. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rateB 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK— Merchants Bank of Canada; CHICAGO— First National 
Bank; LIVERPOOL-North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British 
Linen Company; IRELAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO— London Bank of 
Mexico; SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank of Mexico and South America; 
CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; 
AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of Australasia and Commer- 
cial Banking Company of Sydney, Ld. ; DEMERARA and TRINIDAD 
(West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital *S,OO0,OO0OO 

Surplus and Undivided ProBta (Jan. 1, 1893), 3,276,486 60 

WM. ALVORD, President. 

Thomas Beown Cashier | I. F. Modlton, 2d Assistant Cashier. 

S. Prentiss Smith, Asst. Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

NEW YORK— Agency of The Bank of California. BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank. LONDON— Messrs. N. M. Kothschild & Sons. PARIS— 
Messrs. De Rothschild Freres. VIRGINIA CITY (Ney.)— Agency of The 
Bank of California. CHICAGO— Union National Bank. ST. LOUIS— Boat- 
men's Bank. AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND— Bank of New Zealand. 
CHINA, JAPAN and INDIA— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Oraws direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake, 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, 
Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. ] 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Authorized Capital W,500,000 I Capital paid up 2,450,000 

Reserve 490,000 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 73 Lombard St.,E. C 

Portland Branch. 48 First St. Tacoma Branch, 1166 Pacific Avenue. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRLEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank, 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said citiesand 
all parts of the world. 

THE 6ERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RE8ERVE FUND « 1,770,000 OO. 

Deposits Jan 2, 1894 30,018.739 24 

Officebb— President, EDW. KRU8E ; Vice-President, B. A. BECKER; 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant CaBhier, WM. HERRMANN; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. MULLER. Board of Directors— Edw. Kruse, George H. 
Eggers, O. Schoemann. E. Tlllmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. 
Simon, Ign. Steinhart, Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 



Jan. 90, I8««. 



SAN FBASCISOO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



W- ~R®SzjftlM 



IN THE TEMPLE OF WISDOM.-fly S 

"/~MVK me thy dreams," she said — tod I, 
[j With empty hands and very poor. 
Watched my (air, Bowery vision! die 
Upon the temple's marble door. 

••Give joy." she cried. I let joy go, 
I saw with cold, nnclotided eyes 
The crimson of the sunset glow 
Across the disencbaDted skies. 

"Give me thy yooth," she said. I gave; 
And sodden-clouded, died the eon, 
And on the green mound of a grave 

Fell the slow raindrops, one by one. 

"Give love," she cried. I gave that too. 

"Give beauty." Beauty sighed and fled, 
For what, on earth, should beauty do 

When love, who was her life, was dead? 

She took the balm of innocent tears 

To hiss upon her altar-coal — 
8he took the hopes of all my years, 

And at tbe last she took my soul. 

With hearts made empty of delight, 

And hands that held no more fair things, 

I questioned her, " What shall requite 
The savor of my offerings ? " 

"The gods," she said, "with generous hand 
Give burden for tby gifts of cost; 
Wisdom is thine — to understand 

The worth of all that thou hast lost." 



WHERE MY HONEY SLEEPS.— Will L. Visscher in Chicago 
Figaro. 



Soft the Southern moon is shining; 

81y the star of evening peeps 
Through tbe honeysuckles, twining 

'Round the window where she sleeps— 
Sweetly now the wind is blowing; 

'Mong the leaves the dewdrop gleams, 
While the scent of roses growing 

Fills tbe sweetness of ber dreams, 

An' her face with love-light beams. 

Now, my mocking-bird, sing true, 
Tho' the old owl hoots "To who?" 
An' the ring-dove says " Not you! " 

So the mock-bird's softly trilling. 

From his trembling heart and mouth, 

That sweet song ray heart is filling, 
For my honey, way down South. 

Down the winding river, drifting, 
I am coming, love, to you; 

Through the trees the moonlight's sifting, 
'Cross ray dugout, gum canoe — 
Coming, honey-love, to you. 

In the deep, dark, woods a-hiding, 
Pipes the pluing whip-poor-will, 

All the other birds a-chiding, 

With his plaintive "Still, be still 1 
Like my heart, old whip-poor-will. 



-BAJSTICB. 



THE WIND.— Martha T. Tyler, in Lippincott's Magazine. 

Sea sands that lie 

Lonely and bare beneath the wintry sky, 
What mighty symphony, what vast emotion, 
Sweeps o'er thee from the ocean ? 

Ne'er have I known, 

Not when the blue-eyed Spring 

By stillest mountain pools was wandering, 

When palest lilies on the steeps were blown, 

And the dim wood with madrigals resounded, 

A rapture so unbounded 1 

The rain clouds gather darkly in the west 
Till all the world is robed in somber gray; 
The swift gull wheels above her rocky nest; 
The breakers moan alway; 
But through the rising storm my heart rejoices, 
Moved by the wild-wind voices 1 



Geo. A. Low, 
N Van Bergen, 
Thomas Jennings, 



WELLS, FAR60 & CO.'S BANK. 

M. E. 4'orner *nii«ome and Nutter Htrrrlm. 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

CASH CAP/TAl AND SURPLUS 16,250,000.00 

John J. Vai.kntim .., President. 

HoattS. Kllta . Manager. 

H. Wamworth Cubler. 

F. LLmiil ...... Assistant Cashier. 

BRANCHES. 

New York City H. B. PAKSONS, Cashier. 

Salt Lake City J. E. DOOLY, Caslilor. 

DIRECTORS: 
John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldpc, Henry E. Hunting, 
ton. HomerS. King, Geo. E. Gray, John J. HcCook, Chas. F. Crocker, 
Dudley Evans. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

IN". W. Corner San«ome and Bush Streets, 

Established 1870. O. 8. Depositary. 

CAPITAL (PAID UP) $1,600,000 

SURPLUS. 1700.000 1 UNDIVIDED PROFITS 1186.000 

8. G. MURPHY. President I E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT.. .Vice-President | GEO. W.KLINE As&'t Cashier 

DIHBCTORB: 

George C. Perkins. 8. G. Murphy, 

James D. Phelan, James Moffitt. 

John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 

F^FE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from $5 to 1100 per annum (under the exclusive control of. 

the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 

storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p.m . 

MUTUAL SAVIN6S BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Posl Street, below Kearny (Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G, FAIR President 

JAMES D. PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Diekctobs — James G. Fair, Edward Barron, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James D. Phelan, James Moffitt, 8. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader 
and Frank J. Sullivan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
securities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deporits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,600,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Hbad Office— S Angel ourt, London, E. C. 
AgentB at New York— J. & V- . Sell man & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 
work*. 3ende bills for collection, loans money, buys and Bells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. 8TEINHART I «„..-„- 

P.N.LILIENTHAL.i Managers 
A. L. 8ELIGMAN, Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. w. Cor. Sansonno and Sutter Sta. 

Sjbsoribid Capital $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $750,000 

Head Omcs 68 Old Broad Street, London 

A9BNT8— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.).No. 10 Wall St.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Laxard Freres & Cie, 17Boule 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
merclal and Travelers' Credits issued. 
C IG AL^rj^ E L BAPM ' Sogers. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital «l,25O.O0O. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 
J AMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. L. I. COWGILL, Cashier. 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago — Atlas National Bank. St. LouiB— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley A Co. Paris— Drexel. Harjee & Co. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS: 
William Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin A. K, P. Harmon, 
Adam Grant W. S. Jones J. B. Randol. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL 11,000,000. 

nIRECTORS: 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. B. POND. 

WM. H. CROCKER Pbesidbnt 

W E. BBOWN VICB-PBEBIDBKT. 

GEO. W. KLINE OASHira 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY- 

No. 18 Geary Street, S. P. 

Incorporated November 24. 1869 

ADOLPH C. WEBEK President | EBNST BRAND Secretary 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan 20, 1894. 




ORIENTAL titles daring the middle ages were sometimes very 
grandiloquent. The king of Arrachan was known as "em- 
peror of Arrachan, possessor of the white elephant, owner of the 
two earrings, legitimate heir of Pegu and Brahma, lord of the 
twelve provinces of Bengal, master of the twelve kinks, who 
place their heads under his feet." The king of Acheen formerly 
styled himself "Sovereign of the universe, whose body is as lu- 
minous as the sun; whom God created to be as luminous as the 
moon at her plentitude; whose eye glitters like the northern star; 
a king as spiritual as a ball is round; he who, when he rises, 
shades all bis people." The sovereign of a little Greek Island 
during the middle ages styled himself •> The protector of religion, 
whose fame is infinite; who exceeds the sun, the moon, the un- 
expanded buds, the stars, the jewels." The king of Ava called 
himself "The king of kings, whom all others should obey; the 
cause of the preservation of all animals; the regulator of the sea- 
sons; the master of the ebb and flow of the sea; brother to the 
sun; king of the four-aod-twenty umbreltas." 

Mrs. CrawEord, the noted j juraalist of Paris, says tbar. the 
cigarette ha* not yet found its way with after-dinner coffee iato 
the official drawing room, bit it soon will. At all the homes 
setting up to style it ii served at intimate breakfasts and small 
and lively dinners. Nobody is shocked when a lady smokes not 
merely one cigarette, but two or three. A Minister of Qaeen 
Christiania is responsible for the report that the highly respect- 
able and respected lady is an inveterate and a veteran smoker. 
Most of the Russian Grand Duchesses are smokers. Mrs. Craw- 
ford does not know whether the Qaeen of Italy smokes, but some 
of her ladies certainly do. When she was at tipezia she saw them 
enjoying cigarettes while boating on the lake, and in the grounds 
of the Duchess of Geuoa's villa, where the Queen was. 

If one is to believe the French-Hebrew scholar, M. Ledrain — 
who, by the way, is a bachelor, and as such might be charged 
with incompetency — Frenchmen are the slaves, not French 
women. The latter rule their meek husbands and their meeker 
male friends and acquaintances with a hand of iron. Especially 
is this the case with the Parisienne, says M. Ledrain, who, once 
she has beguiled a helpless man into matrimony, upsets his house, 
disturbs his habits, and thwarts his wishes; nay, even takes a 
nialicious pleasure in forestalling his desires, so that she may 
have the chance of overturning every one of his schemes before 
he has even confided them to her. 

Mrs. Lizzie Smith, of Elizaville, Ky., has filed suit against Miss 
Gonnie Sousley, for $2009 damages. The plaintive claims Miss 
Soasley placed several pins, with the sharp end up, in the church 
pew of the defendant. Mrs. Smith further claims that she sat on 
same pins and was damaged to the amount aske i for in the suit. 
Both ladies are highly esteemed iu their neighborhood, and the 
filing of the suit is causing considerable feeling among the church 
goers of Elizaville. 

At the congress of hygiene in London and at the diocesan con- 
ference in the same city, it was urged that early marriages are so 
great an evil that some sort of reform in the marriage laws Is 
necessary. Investigation showed that the healthiest children are 
those of mothers between 20 and 30, and of fathers between 30 
and 40. Where either husband or wife is under 20, the offspring 
proved generally weakly. 

Sarah Bernhardt was a dressmaker's apprentice. Adelaide 
Neilson began life as a child's nurse. Miss Braddon, the novel- 
ist, was a utility actress in the provinces. Charlotte Cusbman 
was the daughter of poor people. "Mrs. Langtry is the daughter 
of a country parson of small means, but the old story of a face 
being a fortune proved true in her case. 



xisrsTJie.-A»i>rcE. 




THREE AND ONE-HALF DAYS TO THE WORLD'S 

> FAIR. — We take pleasure in advising the readers of the 

NewsLettee that the UNION PACIFIC is the most 

.direct and quickest line from San Francisco and all points 

|in California to the WORLD'S FAIR. 

It is the ONLY LINE running Pullman's latest im- 
proved vestibuled Drawing-Room Sleepers and Dining 
Cars from San Francisco to Chicago without change, and only one 
change of cars to New York or Boston. 

Select Tourist Excursions via the UNION PACIFIC leave San 
Francisco every Thursday for Chicago, New York and Boston in 
charge of experienced Managers, who give their personal attention 
to the comfort of ladies and children traveling alone. 
Steamship Tickets to and from all points in Europe. 
For tickets to the World's Fair and all points east, and for Sleep- 
ing Car accommodations, call on or address D. W. Hitchcock, Gen- 
eral Agent Union Pacific System, No. 1 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco. 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

IN8URANCE COMPANY, 
OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL. $1,000,000. | ASSETS, $3,000,000. 
AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., 
Gen'l Managers. 

40 to 44 PINE STREET, NEW YORK. 

Assets $2,607,675 76 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,189,766 99 

HAZARDS INSURER. 

EMPLOYERS AND PUBLIC LIABILITY, 
BOILER, EXPLOSION, 
GENERAL CASUALTY, 
ELEVATOR ACCIDENT, 
SPRINKLER LOSSES. 
GENERAL ACCIDENT, and 
FIDF.LITY. 
B0LGER & BURLING, General Agents, 

<40S California Street. 

William Macdonald, Manager. D. E. Miles, Ass't Manager. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

L0ND3N AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $10,63 J,50 

Net Surplus Over all Liabilities 3,116,305 

3 1 5 Montgomery Street, - San Francisco 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORTCOSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Toils. Regular" Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 
Office of the Company, 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-California Bank. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 

Geo. Leonard and H. Danker, Managers p. t. for the Pacific Coast 

Branch, 

220 Sansome St., S. F. 

Capital $1,500,000.00 

Invested in U. S H40.346.23 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
Z32 California St.. S.F.,Cal. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO- of New York., 
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO.. of Toronto- 

A. R. GURREY, Manager. | C. A. STUART, Asst. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 
BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL 16,700,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
Mo. 316 California Street. San Franclico 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE GO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, 

413 California Street, San Francisco 



Jan. 20, 1894. 



SAN I 1:\\< I-m NEWS LETT! R 



19 



B5UNBCAMSJ 

IT is a common practice in tbo Court of Sessions for counsel (o 
identify themselves with their cttenlt. For instame. when 
asked by the judge in. say. * cooststorUI »ction who he repre- 
sents, the counsel may laconically remark, "I am the mother, " 
meaning, of 000196) thai he acts fur the mother. The former slipshod 
style of speaking led to a fanny incident ifl the Second DiTiaionro- 
cently. An affiliation case waa called. A well-known counsel ap- 
peared, and was instantly asked by one of the judges, " Are you the 
baby or the mother ? " " No," replied thecoansel, " 1 am the lather." 
Lord Young jocularly remarked that the interlocutor should be, " in 
respect of statement by counsel at the bar. decern against him." This 
occasioned great amusement. —Edinburgh Evening Dispatch. 

"That fellow Fhipps conies here too much," 

Said Susan**, papa grim; 
" We'll have tu put a stop to that— 
You must sit down on him.*' 
Now. Sue is an obedient girl, 
Respects parental powers; 
So when young Phipps came round that night, 

She sat on hiui two hours. —Kansas UUy .Journal. 

A DUDS while walking along the streets raet a little boy, who asked 
him the time. " Ten minutes to nine," says the dude. " Well," says 
the boy, ** at nine o'clock net your hair cut," and he took to his heels 
and ran, the dude after him. when, turning a corner, the dude came 
in contact with a policeman, nearly knocking him down. " What's 
up ? " said the policeman. The dude, very much out of breath, said: 
"You see that young urchin running alone there? He asked me the 
time. 1 told him teu minutes to nine, and he said, ' At nine o'clock 
get your hair cut.' " "Well,' says the policeman, "what are you 
running for ? You've eight minutes more yet." — Good News. 

An old woman of undeniable Celtic origin entered a downtown sav- 
ings bank the other day. and walked up to the desk. " Do you want 
to draw or deposit? " asked the gentlemanly clerk. " Naw, I doant. 
Oi wants ter put some in," was the reply. The clerk pushed up the 
book for her signature, and, indicating the place, said, " Sign on this 
line, please." "Above it or below it?" "Just above it." "Me 
whole name ? " " Yes." " Before Oi was married ? " " No, iust as 
it is now." " Oi can't write." — Boston Transcript. 

She is one of those verv matter of fact girls. " How are you getting 
along with your music ? " asked the young man who was calling on 
her. " Well," she answered, " of course it wouldn't be proper for me 
to compliment myself, but some of the neighbors have told me that 
they have staid awake at night for hours listening to my playing." 
And she smiled in a self-approving way that was sweet to behold." 

— Washington Star. 

The Chung -wab-y at -poo, Canton, assures its readers that the ad- 
vanced age of a man in Canton, ninety-eight years, and of his wife, 
one hundred years, is due to the beneficent reign of the Emperor, and 
adds: ■* Were the Emperor to reign less well, it would be impossible 
for people to grow so old." 

Kashless — Congratulate me, old fellow; I've got Miss Scadds- 
Scadds as good as won. Chumerly— She has intimated that she loves 
you, then ? Kashless— Not directly, but I discovered last night 
that she has niy picture in her photograph case right next to her pug 
dog. — Buffalo Express. 

The man who thinks before he speaks, 

Discovers with dismay 
That some one else has said the thing 

He had in mind to say. — Washington Star. 

" So you used to be in business for yourself, eh ? " asked the busi- 
ness man. " How does it happen you are looking for employment?" 
" I guess I wasn't up to business ways," answered the applicant. 
" Every time I failed I made a failure of it." — Indianapolis Journal. 

Surgeon — You say you were shot by accident and in the same 
breath tell me that the bullet was intended for you. I don't under- 
stand. Wounded Burglar— Great Scott, Doc, don't you know it wuz 
a policeman w'at shot me ? — Buffalo Courier. 

Mr. Gumpps— That boy will never be good for anything until he 
marries. Mrs. Gumpps— I suppose not. Mr. Gumpps— No. He's got 
to get over the habit of hanging around the house. 

— New York Weekly. 

Mr. Brown — I had a queer dream last night, my dear. I thought 
1 saw another man running off with you. Mrs. Brown— And what 
did you say to him ? "1 asked him what he was running for." 

— Brooklyn Life. 

Jones {meeting Brown in a dry goods store)— Hello, Brown, how 
are you ? What are you doing now— got a steady job ? " Brown— 
I guess I have. I'm waiting for my change." — Life's Calendar. 

"So he praised my singing, did be?" "Yes, he said it was 
heavenly." " Did he really say that? " " Well, not exactly, but he 
probably meant that. He said it was unearthly." — Tit-Bits. 

The Easterner must either take his grip and come to California, or 
stay in the East and let the grippe take him. —San Jose Mercury. 

St. Peter— Here's your robe and your harp. Shade of Cholly— 
Ya-as; but where's me chwysanthemum ? — Town Topics. 

Steedman's Soothing Powders successfully used for children, dur- 
ing the teething period, for over fifty years. 

Mothers be sure and use "Mrs. Winslows* Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething. 



Colonel J. M. L. - popular tailor *i \2 Post street. po«- 

Lhe r.-»r«* art. or comi nation of arta, of knowing wbal tta 

goods ara, where thej ..-• ■■ •nufaotored, ind <»f mating them into 

sulfa that (ill the « - ,■• • i.sii. ; \ ml that la why hit 

tailoring PstabHwhmenl i popular. 



XJ^SUBANCE. 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO.. SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 

OF LONDON. I OF LONDON. 

Established a. n , If Founded a. d. 1710. 

Paid-up Capital, • • • I s.000.000. Cash Assets, S10,044,712. 

Cash Assets, I23.1M, 219. I Ansel* lu America, - - • 12,610,368. 

WI. J. LJMDKRS, Ben'l Utnt, 30» Sanson*. SI., San Hranrisfo. Cal. 



THE NEW EN6LAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS. Assets (19.724.638.46. 

President. BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vlee-Pres., ALFRED D. FOSTER 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Build mq Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Co. Limited, of London. 
The Imperial Insurance Co. Limited, ot London 

WM. SEXTON, K. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager 

Paclflc Branch, 221 Sanson,? St., S. I'. 

SWAIN & MURJJOCK, City AgentB. 

THE 



FIRE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BASLE. OF 8T. GALL. OF ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally lor all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 
410 California 8t.. 8an FranciBco, Cal 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE UOMPANY (Limltld) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed . $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 2, 126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6,724,057.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street. San Francisco 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up $ 600,000 

Assets 8,181,758 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,525,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 
City Office— SOI Montgomery St. General omce— 4 01 Mon t'e, St. 

AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. 
Established 1825. 
Capital, $2,260,000. Total Assets, 86,854,653.65 

United States Department: 204 SANSOME ST., SAN FRANCI8CO. 
VWSS, IQUBAD «t CO., General Managers. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1886.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Street. 

GE O. F. OBANT, Manager 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH AMERICA 

#»"01dest Stock Fire Insurance Company In the United States. 

Capital Fully Paid $3,000,OOo 

OF PHILADELPHIA, Penh. 
Office Pacific Department— 

412 California Street, San Francisco, 
JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 



20 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 20, 1894. 



©r 



<?>-.© 




A BLACK dinner gown is a sine qua non in every one's outfit, 
and I have seen several striking ones lately, one in black 
satin with bodice formed entirely of handsome sequin and jetted 
net, skirt trimmed with little puifings of black chiffon, was very 
chic; and a more simple one was in black broche" cloth with 
draped skirt edged with jet over ruoir6, and bodice trimmed with 
jet passementerie. The sleeves and moire" we- e caught up on the 
shoulder, allowing the black jetted lace which adorned them to 
fall over the arm in a very graceful fashion. 

Tea jackets gain in favor day by day. If one comes in tired 
it only takes a few minutes to slip on one of these delicious gar- 
ments; and what a transformation it makes! The new jacket 
shapes are delightful. They affect an austerity that they do not 
carry out. One of these in a black and white striped silk looks 
severely tailor-made from behind, but the sleeves are all of be- 
witchingly puffed crepe de Chine, with black and white lace in- 
sertion showing charmingly against the white ground. The severe 
jacket is open, revealing a vest of accordion-pleated crepe de 
Chine, whose delicacy is accented by the addition of big black 
satin rosettes. There are large plain shoulder-fiaps of the silk 
falling over the puffed sleeves. 

India cashmere and watered silk and ladies' cloth aDd lustrous 
soft ribbed corded silk will be used in combination on spring 
dresses for church wear, visiting, etc. New weaves in Bedford 
cord, Vicuna cloths, roughly woven English serges, hopsacking 
effects in silk and wool mixtures, French camel's hair plain and 
striped, vigognes and cashmeres in fancy designs or in delicate 
monochromes, are all in the hands of fashionable modistes, who 
are already devising novel, quaint and stylish creations for Easter. 
Coats of various shapes and lengths, round waists, princesse 
dresses and gowns, with overskirts, tunics, slight draperies, yoke 
top kilted skirts, gored models and those slashed and paneled ap- 
pear. 

Hats and bonnets are of many designs, the newest being desig- 
nated as the " Windmill," and » Harlequin," the former is made 
in velvet and moire\ with points resembling a windmill. The 
latter is a kind of toque, the one I saw was covered in black 
nioirfi, trimmed with amethyst trimming, and could, so the 
modiste informed me, be worn in several different ways, those 
who like variety might invest in one with advantage, as, though 
unique, they are both stylish and becoming. 

An ideal dancing gown fora young girl is made in white Mech- 
lin net over white satin. The net draperies are arranged in a 
series of handkerchief points, with cascaded revers, edged with 
lines of silver passementerie. From the waist there come straps 
of white satin ribbon, terminating in rosette bows. The bodice 
is arranged with small basques, edged with lines of silver, and a 
pretty trimming of white satin ribbon. 

A stylish dress of black silk has a bell-skirt with three ru Hies at 
the hem and narrow ruffles set on about 18 inches above the 
lower ones. The waist is shirred into a round yoke edged with 
passementerie. The sleeves are close-fitting to the elbows, and 
enormously full above, and ruffles, very deep at the Bhoulders 
and narrower at the front and back, fall over the tops. 

The newly designed black garnitures are striking and elegant. 
They consist of very elaborate appliques for the skirt, corsage 
and sleeves, and tor panels and inserted pieces, to be laid over 
Vandyke points. There are also bands, arabesques and edgings 
with glittering pendeloques depending therefrom. 

A dress for a girl of 12 years is of olive-green Henrietta cloth. 
The skirt has four milliner'.-, folds; the waist is trimmed with 
fancy braid, forming a yoke; round collar, a flat belt and wide 
cuffs. Ruffles of the material, with edging, fall over the tops of 
the fall sleeves. 



To the World's Fair ! 

Are you going? If so, it will be to your interest to call on or write 
to the undersigned before arranging for your trip. The SANTA FE 
ROUTE is the only line under one management from California to 
Chicago. The only line running Pullman Palace and tourist sleep- 
ing cars through to Chicago on the same train every day without 
change. Personally conducted excursions through to Boston leave 
everv Tuesday. W. A. BISSELL, 650 Market street, "Chronicle" 
Building, San Francisco. 

A handsome Japanese vase here and there is an indispensable 
article in household decoration. George T. Marsh, whose store is on 
Market street, under the Palace Hotel, has the largest and richest 
collection on the coast of vases, Satsumas, etc. _ 



0IWL 



Qlearapee Sale 

NOW IN PROGRESS. 

STARTLING 
REDUCTIONS 

IN 

EVERY 
DEPARTMENT. 

See daily papers for particulars. 




Murphy Building. 




MRS. W. E. SPENCER, 



HAIR 

STORE. 



202 ELLIS ST., NEAR MASON. 
Elegant Manicuring and Hair Dressing Parlors. 
Pacific Coast wholesale and retail agent for 
ISABEL CASSIDlf's* superior toilet preparations 
OREME BEATRICE, the most delightful toilet 
preparation of the age, keeps the skin In per- 
fect condition, removes all secretions and stimu- 
lates circulation. A Turkish bath for the face. 
Price, 50c. 

EXQUISITE JAVA RICE FACE POWDER, de- 
lightfully perfumed, adhesive and transparent; su- 
perior In every way; cream, naturelle, white, 50c. 
WITCH HAZEL COLD CREAM, cooling, healing, refreshing; does not 
leave the skin greasy. You will like it. Price, 35c. 

"BEAU BRUMMELL" Finder Nail Polish; instantaneous in its effect; a 
beautiful polish and a delicate pink tint to the nail: beneficial. Price, 50c. 
The above and a full line of superior Toilet aud Manicure Goods manu- 
factured by ISABEL C ASSIDY, 30 West Twenty-third street, New York, and 
201 Masonic Temple, Chicago, on hand here. Indorsed by the profession. 
Circulars sent on application. 

PASSPORT TO BEAUTY 

— is — 




LOLA MONTEZ GREME. 



Mrs. Nettie Harrison will remove Freckles, Pimples, 
Blackheads, Mothpaiches, Sallowness, Wrinkles, Deep 
Lines. Fill out sunken cheeks, and make the old and 
waited flesh, healthy, firm and youthful again or 
MONEY REFUNDED. 

SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 
Permanently removed by the electric needle. 
FREE TREATMENT for beautifying the complexion will be given any 
one presenting this ad. at my parlors. 

MRS. NETTIE HARRISON, America's Beauty Doctor, 

26 Geary St., 8. F., Cal. 



J\)e B<?st Seor?s 



ARE MADE WITH THE 



United 5tates <2artrid$e Qo.'s 

partridges. 



For fine shooting they are simply perfect. 



ZISKA INSTITUTE, 

1604-1606 TAN NESS AVENUE, San Francisco. 

French, German and English day and boarding school for young ladies 

and children. Next term begins Augusts, 1893. For prospectus, address 

MME. B. ZISKA. A. M., Principal. 



Jan . 20, 1894 . 



sw rn\i [a o mws i.i 



21 



4ESJ2WW 



*^>./- T ^m+* 



THKRKis no equality, and hardly »oy approach to II, In iho 
assessment of Improved real estate in this city. In many 
cases, it lakes nearly three months of the rental to pay the city 
and Stale taxes. This is a heavy drain on a man who has laid 
out a large sum of money to improve idle property, expecting an 
ample and Immediate return for his money. When we say three 
months' rental, we wish to bave it understood that we do not 
mean the net. but the gross rental. Tbe man who owns prop- 
erty in tbe business center of the ctty is belter off tban bis neigh- 
bor wbo owns small stores in tbe Western Addition, or Hats and 
small dwellings south of Market street. The property of tbe 
owner of business property is nearly always rented, and be has 
something left over after paying a quarter of his year's rental for 
taxes. But tbe residence property-owner sometimes finds it very 
bard to rent his improvements, au-1 >hould tbey lie vacant for 
six months of the year bis profit would amount to nothing. We 
regret that we find it a fact, but if it were not for the prevailing 
dullness in every branch of business, In every line of commerce, 
unbalanced taxation alone would be enough to keep ibe real 
estate market of San Francisco in a sleepy state. Tbe more build- 
ings tbat go up, the more property increases in value, and in 
accord, the outside lands must rise in value as tbey are needed to 
take tbe place of tbe land already covered with buildings. Ic 
follows, theu, tbat no man should be taxed to sucl an extent as 
to ruin his opportunities for progress and enterprise, and leave 
bim with tbe idea that he would not receive a proper remunera- 
tion if be Improved bis land. And so tbe revolution against 
bosses, assessors, legislators and sucb men must be taken up 
anew. 

The pressure for money has been taken off the savings banks, 
and tbe three largest savings institutions of this city will begin 
lending money as soon as ibe quarterly dividends aie paid. Sev- 
eral capitalists bave been lending money to bnildtrs at rates all 
the way from 6 to 8 per cent. 

Tbe market isin a normal state. Inside real estate is holding 
its own remarkably well. Even with tbe great drawback of high 
taxation it is a good investment at any time. Suburban property, 
on growing business streets, is not in demand. Outside lots find 
ready buyers at low figures. Property along the line of the elec- 
tric road to San Mateo county is growing up gradually. Mission 
lots and property in the neighborhood of the Presidio are dull, 
but real estate in both these sections may pick up by Bpring. 

There is one thing that the News Letter would like to call to 
tbe attention of buyers, and that is the necessity of surveys. The 
lots lying in the city's original boundary {east of Larkin and 
Ninth streets), should always be surveyed before tbe purchasers 
close the sales, as many errors were made in the early surveys of 
the city, and the result was some lots do not contain their right 
extent of ground, and some contain more. Several blocks of the 
most valuable part of Montgomery street are incorrectly laid out, 
and the buildings project from one to two feet on the street. 
Many persons discover, when tbey begin to build, tbat they have 
less ground than they bargained for. Much ill-feeling and many 
disputes are frequently caused by one man's building lapping over 
on another man's lot. All property should be carefully surveyed 
before it is paid for. It costs but little, and saves trouble, time 
and money. 

The Pacific-Union Club is considering plans and specifications 
for a new building. Three lots are also under consideration: the 
property on the northwest corner of Post and Leavenworth 
streets, the Fair lot, on Nob Hill, and the old Castle lot on the 
northwest corner of Sutter street and Van Ness avenue. 

The Parrotts have kept their promise and have begun to im- 
prove their big lot on Market street, thereby giving work to many 
of the unemployed. Work on tbe building will soon be started. 

A. E. Buckingham has retired from the firm of Buckingham 
& Co. The business will be conducted by George H. Bucking- 
ham. 

The pavement in Pine street, between Montgomery and San- 
some streets, is being renewed. This time bituminous rock is 
being put in and the gutters are of basalt blocks and cement. It 
appears to be a good piece of work, but it would not be wise to 
praise it too much, as it might prove unworthy. It was only two 
years ago that this same block was paved in what was supposed 
to be tbe latest approved style. For the paBt year it has been the 
eyesore of the passer-by and a source of danger to all vehicles. 



THE Golden Star Mining Company has incorporated, with a 
capital stock of $100,000, of which $10,000 has been sub- 
scribed. The directors are James McCormick, Wm. M. Pereira, 
P. P. Otis, A. M. Silverstein, George W. Grayson and M. F. 
Campbell. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, Mills Build- 
ing, 218-220 Montgomery street. Special attention given to the col- 
ection of rents. Full charge taken of property for absent owners. 




A Ruddy Glow 

on cheek 
and brow 

is evidence 

that the 

body is 

petting proper nourishment. 

When this glow of health is 

absent assimilation is wrong, 

and health is letting down. 

Scott's Emulsion 

taken immediately arrests 
waste, regardless of the 
cause. Consumption must 
yield to treatment that stops 
waste and builds flesh anew. 
Almost as palatable as milk. 

Prepared by Scott & Bowne, N. T. All druREists. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending December 31.1893, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of five (5) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and 
four and one-sixth (4 1-61 per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and afttr TUESDAY, January 2, 1891. 

VEBNON OAMPBELL, Secretary. 
Office— Cor. Powell and Eddy streets, S. F., Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half-year ending Dec. 31, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five and one-tenth (5 1-10) per cent, per annum on term deposits 
and four and oue fourth (4y A ) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, pay- 
able on and after Tuesday, Jauuary 2, 1894. 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
Oflice— 526 California street. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Savings and Loan Society, 

For the six months ending Dec. 31, 1893, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five (5) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four and 

one-sixth (4 l-6> per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, payable on and 

after Tuesday, January 2, 1893. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier, 
Oflice— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For tbe half year ending with Dee. 31, 1893, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five per cent, per annum on Term Deposits and four and one 

sixth (4 1-6) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Tuesday, January 2, 1894. 

GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 
Office— 33 Post Street, San Francisco. Cal. 

D.VIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San Francisco, December 30, 1893. 
At a regular meeting of the board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of four and one-quarter {4%) 
per cent per annum ou all deposits for the six mouths ending Dec. 31, 18y3, 
free from all taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1894 

R J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Ofli ce— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 
For the half year ending Dec. 31, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five per cent, per annum on term deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-61 per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Tuesday, January 2, 1894. 

LOVBLL WHITE, Cashier 
Office— 326 California street, corner Sansome. Branch— 1700 Market St., 
corner Polk. 

FRANK KENNEDY, LAW-OFFICE, ROOM 66, MURPHY BTJILMNG, 
(Third floor), 1236 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

SLATE BURIAL VAULTS. 

Are recommended by every person who sees them. They are proof 
against dampness, rodents and reptiles; are portable to ship to any part 
of the country. Are cheaper than brick and can be put in place by ordinary 
workmen. Slate Is im- 
peiiNhable by nature, 
and has greater strength 
than any other stone. Ap- 
ply to B. F. ROBERT 
SOK, Pacific Coatst Agent, 
Lob Gatos, Cal. N. CLARK 
& SONS, 17 and IS Speai 
St., San Francisco. 

Telephone 771 . 







22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 20, 1894 . 




THE chief dancing event of last week was the ball at the Hol- 
brook's, on Van Ness avenue, which took place on Friday 
evening, the guests including nearly all the young people of the 
"swini," wiih a few young married folk who were not eo very 
long ago belles and beaux themselves. The entire house was 
thrown open and beautifully adorned with flowers and foliage, 
ferns and red carnations taking a prominent place in the decora- 
tions. Dancing was indulged in on both the parlor floor and the 
one below, so that at no time were any of the rooms uncomfort- 
ably crowded, though the nuuiber of guests was very large. 
Ludwig had charge of the sapper, and the menu was perfect, and, 
taken altogether, the ball was one of the most enjoyable gather- 
ings of the season. 

Of last Saturday's teas it would be difficult to say which was 
the most pleasant. Two of them served the purpose of introduc- 
ing two young iadies. One of these, Miss Grace Llewellyn Jones, 
made her debut at the tea especially given for her by her grand- 
mother, Mrs. Alexander Burnett, on Franklin street, several of 
the season's buds assisting in doing the honors in the prettily 
decorated rooms. The other young lady who made her first 
appearance in society that day was Miss Whittier, at the tea of 
which her sister, Mrs. Bothin, was the hostess. Here, too, a 
number of young ladies and a couple of young matrons helped 
the hostess to make her guests feel at home. At Mrs. Henry L. 
Dodge's the assistants in receiving were nearly all elderly 
matrons, the Misses Hobart, Blair and McKenna forming a trio 
of pretty buds in attendance. Mrs. Bailey, for whom the tea was 
given, was welcomed by a very large number of her friends, she, 
as Miss Mollie Dodge, having been one of the most popular 
society girls of her day. During her visit to her aunt she is sure 
to be made the guest of honor at many a charming dinner and 
lunch table. 

Our Jewish residents are noted for beine among those who give 
the handsomest entertainments, whether a club affair or at their 
private residences. In this latter category was the dance given 
by Mrs. 8. Reiss at her handsome home on Post street, last Sat- 
urday evening, for the purpose of introducing her daughter, Miss 
Nettie, and her niece, Miss Clemence Reiss, into society. There 
were many pretty ideas noticeable in the adornment of the 
rooms. One conceit wa« the decorating of the different apart- 
ments to represent the four seasons, while the conservatory 
(where punch and lemonade was served) was arranged a la Jap- 
anese. Another interesting idea was the solving of a conundrum 
which appeared upon a scroll in the autumn room, and for the 
correct answer Miss Nellie Meyers was the recipient of a pretty 
prize. Dancing was the main feature, with an elaborate supper 
at midnight, after which dancing was resumed. Theguests, who 
were nearly all young people, represented the cream of our Jew- 
ish belies and beaux. 

Society has had another busy week during the past six days, 
and the pace is likely to continue until the advent of the Lenten 
fast. Heading the list came the first of Mrs. Houghton's Mon- 
day afternoon teas at the Palace, crowds of her friends filling her 
rooms to bid her and Miss Minnie welcome back from their long 
absence in the East. Several leading matrons were present at 
the juvenile cotillion which was danced that afternoon by a party 
of young folks at the old Castle residence on Butter street, and in 
the evening the dinner dance at Irving Scott's was one of the de- 
lights of the season. Tuesday there was a progressive euchre 
party, two luncheons, several dinners, and the Artillery bail at 
the Presidio. Wednesday's gaieties included the reception at 
Mrs. Elisha Cook's, on Sixteenth street, and the Perrin-Robinson 
wedding at Grace Church. On Thursday Mrs. Alvord gave a 
luncheon at her home on Broadway, to a party of two-score 
ladies; the ladies at the Colonial (who are coming out strong in 
the musical line) gave a second reception, with music as its cbief 
feature, at the hotel that evening, a few dances winding up the 
pleasant affair, and the ladies at the Church of the Advent gave 
a reception to their new rector, the Rev. H. B. Collier, at the 
Fairmouot. Last night the third cotillion of the Friday Night 
Club was danced at Odd Fellows' Hall, and the marriage of Miss 
Alvina Heuer and Fred Eaton Wilson was solemnized at the 
Heuer residence on Taylor street. 



Saturday has been a favorite day for teas since the earliest 
commencement of the winter season, and there is evidently no 
falling off in its popularity, judging from the fact that to-day 
Mrs. Foute will give one at her home on California street, Mrs. 
E. B. Pond another at her California-street residence; Mrs. E, S. 
Breyfogle will be ihe hostess at a third at the Palace Hotel, in 
honor of her guest, Miss Sallie Collier, and Mrs. Hall McAllister 
will have her sister, Miss Henshaw, as chief guest at a tea at her 
FillHiofe-street home. As a wind-up of the week the Progress 
Club expect a large attendance at Golden Gate Hall this evening 
to witness the operetta of The Oracle. 



Grace Church presented a beautiful appearance on Wednesday 
evening last, doubly bright and warm in contrast to the very disa- 
greeable weather that night. The floral decorations, which are 
always at this church choice in character and elegant in design, 
were confined to the chancel, in which were artistically arranged 
ferns, palms and other foliage plants, the only touch of color com- 
ing from the La France roses which were placed upon the altar 
and altar rails. Pink satin ribbons adorned the white prie dieu, 
and a broad band of pink satin ribbon was stretched across the 
aisle to mark the seats reserved for special friends. Messrs. Mc- 
intosh, McMurtry, Jones, McMullen and Greenway seated the 
crowd, which filled nearly every seat in the church, the assem- 
blage representing the majority of the fashionable people of San 
Francisco. During this process pretty airs were played by the 
organist, Mr. Bosworth. At last Bishop Nichols and his assist- 
ants, Dr. Foute, of Grace Church, and the Rev. Mr. Moreland, of 
St. Luke's, entered the chancel from the vestry room, accompan- 
panied by the groom, Arthur Lee Robinson, and his best man, 
George Norton, of Louisville, Kentucky, and the notes of the 
Lohengrin Chorus gave notice of the coming of the bride. The 
cortege was a short one, consisting of the ushers, the bride's sis- 
ter, Miss Adele Perrin, as Maid of Honor, and then the pretty 
blonde bride and her father, Dr. E. B. Perrin, who gave her into 
the keeping of her husband. Bishop Nichols tied the nuptial 
knot, and at its conclusion handed the bride her bouquet of lilies 
of the valley, which until then bad been lying upon the altar. 
The marriage robe was an elegant creation of white satin, made 
with a court t r ain and trimmed with lace ; a lace vail was confined 
to the bride's coiffure with a spray of orange blossoms and a 
handsome diamond ornament, one of the groom's gifts to bis 
bride. Miss Perrin wore a gown of yellow satin trimmed with 
lace, and pearl ornaments. Mrs. Perrin, the lovely stepmother 
of the bride, was attired in a costume of white satin, with dia- 
mond ornaments. From the church the bridal party drove to the 
Perrin residence on Clay street, where a reception of intimate 
friends and relatives was held. The bay window in the right- 
hand parlor was the place chosen by the happy pair as the locale 
for receiving the congratulations of their friends; this the florist 
had decorated with palms, ferns and blossoms, and the young 
bride and groom looked radiant with happiness as they stood 
there until supper was announced. The dining-room was arranged 
with several tables, the central round one being dedicated to the 
bridal party, the piece de resistance thereon being the huge wedding 
cake. The floral decorations of this table were admirable, the 
prevailing hue being pink (evidently the bride's favorite color), 
La France roses and delicate maiden-hair ferns. Bishop Nichols 
was seated at the bride's table, and he made a happy speech in 
offering the toast of the evening. The wedding gifts were elabo- 
rate. The young couple left for Louisville, Thursday evening, 
escorted to the train by a party of relatives and friends, and will, 
after a short stay there, sail for Europe early in February for a 
year's travel, and upon their return to America will make Louis- 
ville their home. 

Among the weddings on the tapis, the Spanish church of Nues- 
tra Benora de Guadaloupe will be the scene of Miss Rosaria de la 
Rosa' i marriage to Alexander Campbell, Jr., Thursday evening, 
the twenty-fifth, at 8 p. m. Further from home comes news of 
two which are doubtless of some interest to Californians. In one 
instance, the bride will be the daughter of George Hamlin, now 
of New York (she is also the grand-daughter of Henry Gerke, a 
pioneer not only of the State, but in wine making also). In the 
other it is the groom who is a native Californian — George Detrick 
— who on Thursday last married, in St. Louis, Miss Sadie Kaime, 
of that city, where the groom is now a resident. The engage- 
ment of Mrs. Charles Dore and Mr. Frank Johnson is among the 
earliest announcements in the marriage line. 



The dinner dance, which has of late been so great a success in 
the East, is coming into favor in San Francisco, one of the most 
charming having been given by Mrs. Irving Scott Monday even- 
ing in honor of her son, Laurence's, twentieth birthday. The 
guests were exclusively young people, and comprised many of 
this season's buds and belles, as well as many of the favorite 
beaux. The number of dinner guests was fifty, and they were 
all comfortably seated in parties of six at small tables, which 
were artistically decorated in the form of rustic baskets, the bam- 
boo handles being tied with Howers and satin ribbons, each table 
of a color different from the others. The novelty of the idea was 
a charming surprise and the effect beautiful. After a delicious 
supper, dancing was kept up until a very late hour, the whole 
affair proving one of the most enjoyable of the month. 

Mrs. Erwin G. Rodolph will give an afternoon tea from 3 to 6 
and from 8 to 10 this evening, at her residence, 1809 Octavia 
street, complimentary to the "Ladies' Club of '03." Two hun- 
dred invitations have been issued, and the programme indicates 
a very brilliant affair. Mrs. Rodolph, Miss McLaine, Mr. George 
McBride, the basso, and Prof. A. J. Kelleher will render some 
choice vocal selections, accompanied by Mrs. H. J. Stewart. 

H. S. Herrick has moved from Oakland to San Francisco, and 
will reside permanently at the Palace Hotel. 



Jan. 20. 189*. 



SAN 1 R.O NEWS LETTER 



23 



Tb« Mcond Patriarch b«I1 look plftC* on tbe Qih m«t. At Pel- 
roontco't. Tb* arrangement* wrr* prwUrly Ihe P*m* a« tot the 
flr»t ball of ibe 9Ub*rripiion. Ther* wervbui few dvcorallont, thepp 
-ting of palms and flnwrrini plants, which were placed in 
the aorTldon. The Hungarian Band played f<»r Ihoaa who detlrel 
to dance in the red room, Lander'i Orche«fa being stationed In 
the balcony of the ball room A Patriarch's ball is always a lale 
one. and it was not until midnight that dancing was well under 
way. Sapper was served in the r.-*tatirant soon after one o'clock, 
and compri«rd inch a delightful menu as only DolmonfOO can 
serve, while Ml Bt Mane and Appolllnutl Mown! freely. It was 
nearly half past iwoo'clock before thecottllion began. Mr. Prank- 
lin Bartlett leading with Mrs. rVrnando Yr.naga. There were no 
favors. A moon those present were M. an<l Mme. Paul Bourget, 
Princess Hatxfeldt. the Marquise tie Tallyrand l'erigord. Count 
and <"nanie?s Roitignac. of Pari*, fount BierstorptT. of Germany, 
the Duo de Lerme. of Spain. Mr. and Mrs. H. McK. Twonibly, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. V. Havemeyer. Mr. and Mrs. H. Le Grand Can- 
non. Or. and Mrs. W. Seward Webb, Mr. and Mrs. F. ErJgerton 
Webb. Mr. and Mrs. Elish Dyer. Jr.. Mr. William Tiffany. Mr. 
and Mrs. Herman Oelrich<=, Mi?? Pair, Colonel and Mrs. De Lancy 
Kane. Mr. Cambridge Livingston, Mr. and Mrs. J. Hooker Ham- 
nier*>ley. Mr. William Rockefeller, Miss Rockefeller, Mr. and 
M «. Reginald De Koven, Sir Roderick Cameron, the Misses 
Cameron. 

Military entertainments have a charm about thetn peculiar to 
themselves, and an iuvitatiou to one is seldom declined. What 
a display of lovely women, buds and ful'-blown blossoms were 
in evidence at the Presidio last Tuesday evening! The soldiers 
appreciated the compliment by extra devotion in tbeir attention 
to the guests. Fortunately tbe clouds and rain passed away, 
and a moonlight night graced the occasion. Notwithstanding 
this, tbe officers bad provided against possible clouds by illumin- 
ating the grounds, so, as the carriages rolled into the Reserva- 
tion, the guests were greeted with a scene of brflliancy and 
beauty quite unexpected. At tbe door of the assembly room 
stood the committee of reception, the officers in full uniform, the 
ladies in elegant toilettes. The ballroom was admirably deco- 
rated — guns, sabres, dags and bunting, palms, ferns and flowers, 
being used with fine effect — then, bright buLtons and gold lace ! 
The cavalry scored a success last season of which they were 
justly proud, and the artillery may now feel they can lay claim 
to having given a ball that was fully equal to any gone before. 



Awarded Highlit Honors World's Fair. 



Young people's dinners have been the fad this season, and 
among tbe hostesses who have given them few Dames appear 
more frequently than those of Mrs. McBean and Mrs. McCut- 
cheon, with Miss Diraond, Miss Hobart and Mrs. Moore pressing 
them closely. All these ladies have given dinners during the 
past ten days. Other recent hostesses at luncheon and dinner 
are Mrs. J. C. Stubbs, Mrs. Lee, whose guests were cbiefly wives 
of army men; Mtb. J. R. K. Nuttall and Mrs. 8. G. Murphy, wbofe 
dinner last Monday evening was in honor of the bride-elect, Miss 
Helen Perrin, and her fianc6, Arthur Lee Robinson, at which ibe 
two gentlemen who accompanied the groom from the East, 
Messrs. Norton and Henning, also were present among tbe four- 
teen guests at table. Tuesday evening Mr. Robinson was the 
host at a dinner which he gave in the Tapestry Room of the Pal- 
ace Hotel, the company including the entire bridal party of the 
following night. 

It is pleasant to note the fact that the good women of town — 
the wealthy women of fashionable life — are bestirring themselves 
in behalf of their unemployed and suffering sisters. Next Thurs- 
day and Friday evenings there will be given, at SiockwelTs 
Theatre, the favorite drama, Held by the Enemy, with leading 
young men and women in tbe roles, for the purpose of raising 
money with which to found a co-operative laundry, together 
with an employment and training establishment, by means of 
which young women may secure employment and earn a living. 
The affair is under the patronage of many leading women, in- 
cluding Mesdames Horace Davis, Lloyd Tevis, Marriner Camp- 
bell, Jean Parker, Edna Poulson, Sarah Hamlin, H. M. A. Miller, 
L. L. Baker, Robert McMurray and others, and it is intended 
that this shall be a society event of unusual importance. The 
idea was set afoot by the Pacific Coast Women's Press Association. 

It is pleasant news to society to hear that the Tevis house is, 
after several years of quiet, to be again the scene of festivity, 
even though only a limited number of the Tevis' friends are to be 
entertained. For this partial re-opening Dr. Harry Tevis, who is 
at present visiting his parents, is to be thanked, as, belonging to 
the Fortnightly Club, he has arranged that their next meeting 
shall be held at the old homestead, which is one of the few 
houses sufficiently large to meet the requirements of the club. 
Tbe billiard room will be turned into a theatre, and tbe entertain- 
ment will be of as varied a character as was that of the first meet- 
ing last week. 

The friends of Major J. L. Rathbone are sympathizing with 
him in his recent sad loss, the death of his mother, Mrs. Harris, 
having occurred at Albany, New York, on Monday last. 



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Used in Millions of Homes— 40 years the S tandard 

One of the pleasantest of tbe recent teas was the one given by 
Mrs. Forbes last week ; she had tbe assistance of her daughters 
and several other ladies, maids and matrons, in receiving tier 
guests. Tbe rooms were tastefully decorated, aDd a large num- 
ber of the old set were noticed in them during the tea hours, 
pleasant music and lieht refreshments contribuling to tbe enjoy- 
ment of all present. Music was tbe chief feature of Mrs. Lough- 
borough's reception the same evening, at which tbe guests were 
nearly all unmarried people. 



Tbe resumption of tbe popular "dancing class" of last year hes 
been bailed with delight by society's budding maidens, and the 
cotillion, which is its chief feature, is danced with exefedirg 
spirit. Lunt's Hall, on Polk street, is their place of meeting. 
Mr. Southard Hoffman makes an efficient leader, and the figures 
are among the prettiest and most novel danced this season. 



Society is hoping for a very brilliant gathering at the beautiful 
Nob Hill palace of C. P. Huntington in the early Easter season, 
and the fact of Mrs. M. H. de Young having recently built a large 
ballroom adjoining tbe de Yonng residence on California street, 
augurs well for gaiety in that direction also. 

A benefit for the cemetery fund of the "Old Friends" society 
will be given at the California Theatre on Thursday night next, 
when The Ensign will be produced. 



Mrs. L. Acosta, Miss Clotilde Acosta and Dr. and Mrs. Eduardo 
Maldonado are residing in their new home, 2121 California street. 

The many friends of Mrs. L. S. B. Sawyer, will be pleased to learn 
that she is recovering from a very severe illness. 

"The Assembly " will give its third dancing party of the season 
in the Maple room of the Palace Hotel February 1st. 

THOMAS HILL, the well-known California artist, has returned 
to San Francisco, and has established a studio and exhibition 
rooms at apartment 79, Flood Building. Mr. Hill's paintings 
have been recognized by patrons of art throughout the world. 
Some of his most important works — "Grand Canon of the Color- 
ado," "Canon of tbe Yellowstone," "Last Spike," "Wawona," 
"Yosemite," and "Muir Glacier" — are on exhibition now in his 
studio. Those who appreciate his masterly work will be glad to 
visit his studio, and pass a pleasant hour or so with his enter- 
taining works. He is a broad-minded man and a thorough 
artist. His painting, ■■ The Grand Cafton of the Colorado," was 
intended for the Midwinter Fair, but its sale will prevent it from 
being exhibited there. 

If oysters could talk, tbey would say that they would rather be 
among those sold at Moraghan's stalls, 63 to 67 California Market, 
for then they would know that they are in the best company. 

Unlike the Dutch Process 

No Alkalies 

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Other Chemicals 

are used in the 
preparation of 

W. BAKER & CO.'S 

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J with Starch, Arrowroot or 
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It is delicious, nourishing, and easily 

DIGESTED. 

Sold by Grocers everywhere. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Haas. 




24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 20, 1894. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trams Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

I ARRIVE 



Leave | 



From Jan. 14. 1894. 



7:00 A Atlantic Express, Ogden a ad East 6:45 a 

7:00 a Benicia, Vacaville, $Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento and Redding via Davis . 7:15 p 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Napa, Calis- 

toga and *Santa Rosa 6 :15 p 

8:30 a Niles, 8an Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, 'Oroville, 
andRedBluff ■ 4:15 p 

9:00 a New Orleans Express, Santa Bar- 
bara, Los Angeles, Deming, El 

Paso. New Orleans and East 8:45 p 

*9:00 A Stockton and Milton. *8:45 p 

110:00 a Haywards, Niles and San Jose... J6:15 p 
*12:00 m Haywards, Niles and San Jose . . *6:15 p 
*1:00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00 p 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano, and 
Santa Rosa ■■ 9:15a. 

4:00 p. Benicia, Vacaville, Esparto, 
$$Rumsey, Woodland, Knight's 
Landing, Marysville, Oroville 
and Sacramento 10:45a 

4:30 P. NileB, Livermore and San Jo^e 8:45 a 

5:00 p. Martinez, Stockton, Modesto, Mer- 
ced and Fresno 10:45a 

5:00p. Los Angeles ExpresB, FreBno, 
Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara and 
Loa Angeles 10:15a. 

5:00p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mojave and East 10:45 a. 

6:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East. . 9:45a 

6:00p. Haywards, Niles and SanJose.. 7:45a. 

17:00 p. Vallejo +8:45 p. 

7:00 p. Oregon ExnreBS, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and East 10:4^ a 

Santa Cruz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

8:16a. Newark. Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 6:20 P. 

*2:15 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New 
Almaden, Felton, Boulder Creek. 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 

stations *11:50a 

4:15 P. Newark, SanJose, Los Gatos. 9:&0a. 

+11:45 P. Hunters' Train for Newark, Al- 
viso, San Jose, Los Gatos and way 

stations 17:20p 

Coast Division (Third aid Townsend Streets). 
6:45 a. San Jose, New Almaden and Way 

Stations 2:45p. 

8:15 a. San Jose, TreBPinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
San Luis Obispo and principal 

WayBtatione 6:26 p. 

10:40a. San Jose, and Way Stations. .. . 5:06 p. 
12:25 P. Palo Alto and Way Stations.. 4:15 p. 
*2:20p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove *10:40 a. 

*3:80 p. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions 9:47 a. 

*4:25p. Palo Alto and Way Stations *8:06 a. 

6;10p. San Jose and Way Stations *8:48a, 

6:30p. Palo Alto and Way Stations 6:35a. 

fll:45p. Palo Alto and principal Way 

Stations +7:26 p. 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

FromSW FlUSflSCO— Foot of Market St. (Slip 8)— 
*7 00 *8 00 9 01 *10 00 and 11 00 a. m., *12 30 
11 00 *2 00 3 00 *4 00 5 00 and *6 00 p. M. 

From OIKI.ASn— Foot of Broadway. 

*6 00 *7 00 8 00 *9 00 10 00 and *ll 00 A. M. 
t!2 00 »12 30 2 00 *3 00 4 00 an d "5 00 p. a. 

A. for Morning. p. for Afternoon . 

*8undayB excepted. +Saturdays only. 

tSundaysonly. 
$ Monday, Wednesday and Friday oaly. 
ft< r ) Going— Saturday and Sunday only. 
vv j Returning— Sun-lay and Mo nday nuly. 

Tbe PACIFIC TRANSFER COnT^A^Y 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residencea. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other information. 

Convenience 
and Economy 

effected in every household by the use of 

Liebig Company's 
Extract of Beef 

The beat way to improve and strengthen 
Soups and Sauces of all kinds is to add a 
little of this famous product. 



H 



THE SCHOOLGIRL.— London Queen. 

ER smooth head bending low, 

She pores with eager joy, 

Dark eyes and cheek aglow, 

O'er the old tale of Troy. 

Dear heart and innocent soull 

Thee may the growing years, 
As thy quick spring-tides roll, 
Bring joy, not tears. 

For thee let knowledge spread 

History's tented page. 
Quaint thoughts of sages dead, 

The poet's noble rage. 
Gains patient science gives, 

And lettered fancies fine, 
The master work which lives, 

Deathless, divine. 

For thee let music wake 

Deep inarticulate chords 
Which the rapt soul can take 

Swifter than any words; 
Art's precious garden smile 

Through gates enwreathed with 
flowers, 
And fairy dreams beguile 

Thy blameless hours. 

But may no learning dim 

Those clear, regarding eyes; 
Still let the morning hymn 

And orisons arise. 
Leave knowledge which the mind, 

And not the heart can move. 
Still, girl, thy treasure find 

In faith and love. 



AT a recent prayer-meeting in New Jer- 
sey, a Democratic brother prayed that 
God would cause the Democratic Party to 
hang together, whereupon a Republican 
present shouted "Amen, Ameu." This 
led the Democratic brother to make tbe 
following emendation in his prayer: " Not, 
O Lord, in the sense our Republican bro- 
ther means, but in the spirit of accord and 
concord." " Any cord will do, Lord; any 
cord will do," interjected the Republican. 
The pastor immediately made a rule that 
hereafter politics should be kept out of the 
prayer meeting. 



THE English in which some of the 
natives of India write their bills is 
sometimes very amusing. One in which 
the native had wished to charge for a gos- 
ling, and also for the tip that had been be- 
stowed on the bearer of tbe bird, ran thus: 
Reward to a hermit 2 annas- 
One goose's pup 4 annas- 

PRACTICAL FATHER— Has the young 
man who wants to marry you any 
money? Romantic Miss — Money 1 He 
gave me a cluster diamond ring studded 
with pearlB. Practical Father — Yes, I 
know. Has he any money left ? 

— New York Weekly. 



The most Teminine occupation of a farm- 
er — sowing. 

The burglar is most bird-like when he is 
a-robbin*. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIEBT and BRAN 
NAN STREETS, at 3: 00 p. m. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Gaelic Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1894 

Belgic .Thursday, Feb. 8, 1894 

Oceanic (via Honolulu)... .Tuesday. Feb 27, 1894 

Gaelic Tuesday, March 20, 1894 

ROUND TRIP TICKET8 AT REDUCED RATES 
Cabin Flans on exhibition and Passage 
rickets for sale at 8. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
streets, flan Francisco. 

For freight apply at offices of Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company, at wharf, or at No. 202 
Front street, San Francisco. 

T.H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 



I A Thinking | 

Machine 

»m 

a- Is what the brain is. It needs the >;$ 

M nourishment of a stimulating and * 

'gj natural food. There is no product jjjj 

* that contains more phosphorus, lime m 

■ and sodium — food for the brain and ■ 

^ nerves — than » 



MMM 



CLAM 



This claim is based on physiological jjjj 
facts. Thinking men and women ^ 
should use it at least twice a day. S 
■ Never buy Bouillon for the sick, B 
555 except in Class Bottles. 

)j[ Grocers and Druggists. h 

M Six ^j pint boitles expressed for $1.50. Send £3 
jjf stamps for book, Household Hints." jjjj 
" E.S.Burnham Co., i2oGanesvoortSt.,N.Y. H 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Thbouqh Line to New Yoek, via Panama. 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 

America. 

BAILINGS— At noon. 

8 . 8. "Colon," January 18, 1994. 

S. S. "San Juan," January 29, 1894. 

S. S. " San Bias," February 8, 1894. 

S. S. "Colima," February 19, 1894. 

Note.— When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA 

AND HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc.: 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

8. 8. "City of Peking," Thursday, January 

18, 1894, at 3 p. m. 

S. S. "China," via Honolulu, Tuesday, January 
30, 1894, at 8 P. m. 

8. 8. "Peru," Saturday, February 17, 1894, at 
3 P. M. 

S.S. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Thursday, March 
8, 1894, at 8 P. m. 
Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 
202 Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 
General Agent 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports iu Alaska, y a. m., Jan. 10,25; Feb. 9,24; 
March 11, 26; April and May, 10, 26. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
Jan. 5th, and every 5th day thereafter. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For 8an Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, (Santa Monica,) 
Redondo, (Los Angeles), and Newport, every 
fourth and fifth day, at 11 a. m. 

For ports in Mexico, 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOOrALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

« II bv n The splendid 3.000 

15 v^J — i-^y. ft ton Bteamers of the 

oV^^ H^v A Oceanic Steamship Co. 

Bail for HONOLULU, 

O AUCKLAND and SYD- 

? NBY as under: 

For HONOLULU. 
8. 8. - AUSTRALIA," 

Jan. 20, 1894 
For HONOLULU, 
APIA, AUCKLAND 
and SYDNEY, S. S. 
"MONOWAI," Feb. 
8th, 2 p. M. 

For passage apply to 138 Montgomery Street. 
For freight apply to 327 Market Street. 
J. D. SPKECKlLo & BEOS. CO., General Agts. 




SfiVET* 



PT% e« p«r Copy, 10 C«nta. 



Annual Subscription. S-4.00. 




8 »« rR*Nei« tQ 




News 

(faUfornticXobxt'lisn-. 



• ETTER 




Vol. ILVlll 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1S94. 



Number 4. 



Printed and Published firry Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred 
Marriott. 606-609-613 Merchant Street. San Francis™. Fil- 
tered at San Francisco Posl-offire as Second Class Matter. 



The ofice of the News Letter in .Yen Fori City is at the " Evening 
Pott " Building, 204-206 Broadway, Room 1. u'here information 
nay be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 



Communications intended for publication should be in the hands of the 
editor by noon of Thursday. 



THE pulpit is only a few steps beyond the sidewalk, after 



all. 



THERE is no resting place half way between vice and virtue, 
where honesty of purpose can sit down and contemplate 
which way to go. 

THE young lady who appeared on the stage of the Grand Opera 
House on Wednesday night last, evidently wanted her con- 
dition to impress the audience that she and the band came from 
the prohibition State of Iowa. 

JAMES J. CORBETT has vanquished Charles Mitchell in the 
prize ring. He still holds the championship of the world. The 
financial panic which would have struck San Francisco had he 
lost, did not come. 



IN these depressed times, when every city in the United States 
has its army of unemployed, clamorous for bread, it is gratify- 
ing to note with what generosity the numerous churches and 
missionary societies continue to pour out their money for the 
purchase of Bibles and red shirts fortbe heathen in foreign lands. 



ANOTHER man has seen a sea serp-nt. His word is his bond, 
so we suppose that we must believe him. He is a little 
modest about the length of the snake, putting it down as low as 
one hundred feet, which, after the former descriptions of this 
mach-abnsed creature, would either prove it a very young one 
or the narrator of the tale a man who had some fear of the here- 
after. 



(I 



cried 



THIS for a World's Fair medal 1 " 
Bill Chandler; " it will never do, man 



This young man standing in his hide 

Strikes me with blushes through and through, man. 

8uch shameless art I never saw; 

Here, take it back, and in its lieu, man, 

Bid sculptor St. Gaudens go draw 

The figure of a woman! " 



RUSSIA has decided to spend a quarter of a billion in the im- 
provement of her navy. This seems to be a pretty heavy 
outlay in pursuance of a plan to keep the peace. But the powers 
of Europe do not stop at expense. England will have to meet 
these figures, and France will be expected to slide several big 
war-ships into the water. It looks as though the test of modern 
naval improvements were not far off, and that it may be fol- 
lowed by some material changes in the map of the Eastern Con- 
tinent. 



THE introduction of the phonograph into the telephone ser- 
vice in San Francisco, although it is not yet fully understood 
by some of the patrons, is a very important improvement, and 
will undoubtedly be introduced in other cities. When the line is 
engaged, a phonograph, the cylinder of which bears an impression 
of the words, " We will call you— line busy," previously spoken 
into the instrument and repeated several times, is connected 
with the line of the customer who has made the call, and he is 
thus automatically informed of the state of affairs without the 
services of a clerk being required. Modifications of this idea are 
employed for other contingencies which hi' herto have required 
stereotyped answers from the clerks, thus saving much time. The 
Pacific Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company is to be congratu- 
lated on the success of this ingenious invention. 



FROM the number of epistles sent out by Governor Pennoyep 
one would really believe that the first syllable of bis 'name 
was mightier than the sword. 



PROBABL\ the surest way to capture Evans would be to set a 
big bear trap somewhere in tbe Sampson Flat country, and 
bait it with a George Sontag. a detective Will Smith or a good fat 
express messenger. Evans could hardly resist the temptation to 
devour such a toothsome morsel, but who has tbe courage to set 
the trap? Of course it might take some time to reduce tbe 
maimed monster to submission, even if he should be caught in 
this way, but as soon as this was accomplished an avalanche of 
armed depuiy sheriffs might be induced to attack him and put 
out his other eye, so that he could not sight a gun with his accus- 
tomed deadly aim the next time he broke jail. 



EVANGELIST CURRIE, the reformed bruiser, has offended the 
dignity of certain members of the ministry and deaconry of 
Los Gatos by kindly but firmly pointing out to them wherein 
their habitual use of tobacco smacks strongly of tbe devil. He 
explained to their benighted minds that the weed doesn't grow 
in heaven, and how disconsolate they will be there without their 
accustomed whiff or chew. The defect in Brer Currie's exhorta- 
tions is that they are based on an erroneous postulate; had he in- 
formed the pipe-smoking, plug-chewing followers of the Lamb 
that there would be no tobacco in hell, it would have been much 
more to the point. 



THE published rumor that Senator James D. Byrnes will be 
chosen to succeed James Rea as Railroad Commissioner loses 
its force when it is reflected that they do not belong to the same 
district, and that therefore, whether or not Mr. Kea becomes a 
candidate for re-election, Senator Byrnes cannot succeed him. 
There can be no doubt that Mr. Rea has made an efficient officer, 
and that if he should choose to run again he could be elected. In 
his political career he has made many and bitter enemies among 
what are called, in Santa Clara County, the Silurian element; but 
his geniality, his fidelity to his friends, his known personal in- 
tegrity, and his unyielding will have swept every obstacle away. 
In a larger political field, among broader men, he would be a 
power in higher politics. 



THE exercises attending the opening of the Midwinter Fair will 
beheld to-day, and the preparations indicate a demonstration 
the most imposing in the history of the West. At the fairgrounds 

everything has been done to secure the comfort of visitors 

macadamized roads and stone walks assure dry ground, the nu- 
merous shows of the concessionaires are in full running order 
and the exhibits in tbe main buildings are in fairly good shape' 
A grand parade of Federal soldiers, the National Guard, the Naval 
Battalion and many civic societies will form on Van Ness avenue 
in the forenoon, and march out thence on Golden Gale avenue to 
the Park. General Dickinson will serve as Grand Marshal, and 
Governor Markham and other civil as well as military celebrities 
will be in the line. Tbe ceremonies of dedication will begin when 
the parade has ended at the fair grounds. In the evening there 
will be a great display of fireworks and electric light effects, as 
well as band music in the Grand Court and in the buildings. 



THE "great dailies" of New York, which are always blowing 
their blatant horns against trusts, combines and corporations 
as being the death of the American workingmen, have, them- 
selves, formed a combination whereby the city news is gathered 
through a central bureau. In this way all the papers print 
exactly the same news every day. But this is not the worst 
feature of the combine, and when it is taken into consideration 

that three hundred men — reporters, copy-readers and editors 

have been thrown out of employment, then we see the meanness 
of the demagogic proprietors, who do not practice what they 
preach. After a newspaper man has labored for rive or six years 
to perfect himself in his chosen calling, it is bard for him to be- 
come accustomed to a new business. But the fact that the daily 
papers of New York city, the great papers of the world, should 
so belittle themselves as to draw the same news from tbe same 
source, is really beyond human conception. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 27, 1894; 



WESLEY AN EVOLUTIONIST. 



IT was long before the beginning of the present mincing between 
local preachers and scientists over the conflict between evolu- 
tion and revealed religion — it was last July, in fact — that William 
H. Mills read a remarkable paper before the Chit-Chat Club of this 
city, in which he proved, by John Wesley's own writing.", that this 
great founder of Methodism was as bold and free as Charles Darwin 
himself to announce that man and the lower animals, instead of be- 
ing special creations, have descended by evolution from lower forms 
of life. This will likely prove a shock to all Christians, and especially 
to Methodists, who have always been particularly intolerant of 
the doctrine of evolution. It is known to but few of these good per- 
sons that in 1775 Wesley published an able work entitled " Wesley's 
Philosophy," and that it was reprinted in New York in 1823. In the 
course of his able lecture, Mr. Mills calls attention to the fact 
that Wesley's teaching was a protest against the formulism o* 
his time, and that in order to make it effective he entered the field 
of natural philosophy, drawing largely upon Deuton, Charles Bonet, 
Professor Flint, the Latin work of Francis Buddoeus, and Dr. Gold- 
smith. In the preface to his work Dr. Wesley said: " In process of 
time many discoveries have been made which have been gradually 
assented to as prejudice could give place: for, allowing that it takes 
a century to make a discovery, it requires anothercentury to remove 
a prejudice. Such is the force of attachment and the power of habit 
that when one's mind is established in wrong, it will hardly be restored 
to right. The modest efforts of reason are too feeble to shake the 
foundation of error." As if not content with this cruel belaboring of 
the religionists of his time (with whom the most of those of the pres- 
ent day are identical in spirit), Ihe great preacher adds— and this, it 
should be remembered, was a hundred and twenty years ago, when 
science had but begun to nibble at the wonderful truth: " In those 
minds wherein ignorance and indolence have conspired against 
truth, such a conspiracy is too formidable to permit the hope of 
speedy reformation of popular wrong. The uncultivated mind is 
more prone to judge than to investigate, to censure than to aid." 
And now he strikes the keynote of the descent of man: " Of all the 
vast variety of being that everywhere surrounds us, we behold noth- 
ing permanent, nothing durable, nothing exempt from change." 

Mr. Mills, after quoting E. P. Powell, author of " Our Heredity 
from God," published in 1890, to the effect that it has been only 
within the last fifty years that theology has accepted the doctrine of 
the unity of nature, and showing that Wesley had announced it long 
before, quotes Darwin on the absurdity of a belief in special creations, 
and then a parallel assertion from Wesley: ''All," says the latter, 
" is metamorphoses in the physical world. Forms are continually 
changing; the quantity of matter alone is unvariable. The same 
substances pass successively into the three kingdoms. The same 
composition becomes by turns a, mineral, plant, insect, reptile, fish, 
bird, quadruped, man." That is even more radical than the most 
daring scientists, for whereas Wesley seems to announce a belief that 
animate things are evolved from inanimate, modern scientists have 
found an impassable gulf between life and death. But it is clear that 
Wesley did not believe in special creations, and that, like Darwin, he 
believed all existing higher forms of life, including man, to have beeu 
evolved from lower. Thus Wesley was even bolder than Darwin in 
sweeping Genesis from the field. The resemblance between Wesley 
and Darwin, as presented by Mr. Mills, is astonishing to the last 
degree. Thus, Darwin says: " The most ancient progenitors in the 
kingdom of the Vertebrae at which we are able to obtain an obscure 
glance, apparently consisted of a group of marine animals, resembling 
the larvie of existing Ascidians. These animals probably gave rise 
to a group of fishes ; " and these are traced up through reptiles to am- 
phibians, to the marsupials and mammals, and then to monkeys; 
from the old-world branch of these came man. Wesley, nearly a 
century before, had followed the same line of reasoning. His ascend- 
ing scale in evolution was this : Fishes, flying fishes, bats, birds, sea- 
lions, hippopotami, crocodiles and tortoises (quadrupeds); amphib- 
ious birds, in which scales succeed feathers, bills take the place of 
feet [sic], wings and teeth follow tins, lungs take the place of gills; 
then " hairy birds" (Hying mammalia); the ostrich, " with the feet 
of a goat, which runs rather than flies, seems to be another link 
which unites birds to quadrupeds; " then the ape is reached. "The 
ape is the rough draft of man ! " cries Wesley, triumphantly. Still 
stronger is the following, remarkable for the accuracy with which it 
expresses the scientific idea of the unity of nature: "From man, the 
ape and horse, to the squirrel, weasel and mouse, we shall see through- 
out the same design, the same arrangement, the same essential rela- 
tions, except in a few particulars." Even among men, he declares, 
are variations in development; and "there is a prodigious number of 
continued links between the most perfect man and the ape." On the sub- 
ject of souls (which, theolngists claim, are a direct and special gift to 
mankind) Wesley says: " Has God created as many species of souls 
as there are animals ? or is there only one species of soul in animals, 
differently modified according to the diversity of organization ? This 
question is absolutely impenetrable by us." The philosopher does 
not stop even there, for he says, more boldly still: "The scale of 
creation does not terminate at man. Another universe commences 
there, whose extent, perhaps, compared to that of this, is as the 
space of a solar vortex to the capacity of a nut." 



THE NECESSITY FOR A TRANS-PACIFIC CABLE. 



WHATEVER be the future form of government of the Ha- 
waiian Islands, it is certain that their trade relations with 
this country are and must continue to be of such importance as 
to call for telegraphic communication between their shores and 
ours. Moreover, the United States have an interest in the entire 
round of the Pacific Ocean which demands a new departure by 
this country. So far, our cable connections with other lands 
have been effected mainly by foreign investors. Europe had so 
large an interest in our markets that she needed no further or 
other incentive to supply us with all the cables we required in that 
direction. Bat the case is very different in regard to cables across 
the ocean that confronts us on this side of the American conti- 
nent. The interest of Europe is to keep the United States from 
tapping the markets situated around the broad Pacific. It is our 
interest, and should be made our earnest business, to do that 
which Europe would prevent us from accomplishing. To reach 
Hawaii is the first step, but only a step, in the work that mani- 
festly lies before us. This ought to be a most favorable time for 
pushing the project. The whole country has recently had its 
patience sorely tried by reason of the absence of telegraphic com- 
munication with Honolulu, and the entire press has demanded 
that the deficiency be supplied without delay. That suits the in- 
terests of California so wel' that the fervor of tbe present ought 
not to be permitted to cool off without something being done. If 
this favorable occasion be permitted to pass away without being 
availed of, it may be many years before a like opportunity occurs 
again. The subject matter is one specially calculated to call out 
theactivities of our Chamber of Commerce and of our B. a~d of 
Trade. The former body is just now particularly well organized 
to care for this matter. General Diruoud, its new President, is 
intimately connected with the commercb between San Francisco 
and Hawaii, and as a native of the Islands, he has always been 
somewhat of an enthusiast as to their welfare. Then the com- 
mittee of the Chamber that has the subject in charge is beaded by 
the indefatigable Mr. Hugh Craig, who, as a native of New Zea- 
land and as the manager of the interests here of that country's 
most successful insurance company, has for many years taken 
an active part in all movements calculated to promote trade be- 
tween California and the countries of the South Pacific. These 
gentlemen will make the project "go" if anybody can. France 
has already connected New Caledonia with Australia, and the 
company that recently laid its cables is anxious to extend it by 
way of Fiji, Samoa and Hawaii to this coast. Both Canada and 
Australia are considering the company's proposals. This coun- 
try should unite with and control so promising a movement. 



HAWAIANA. 

THE sensational dailies are running the Hawaiian business for 
more than it is worth. They are pursuing it after its inter- 
esting features have departed. The questions of annexation and 
of the restoration of Liliuokalani are both dead. She refused to 
take the tide at a time when it was ready to How on to fortune, 
and if she now finds herself permanently stranded, she has but 
herself to blame. As to present annexation, nobody now 
seriously considers it. Conceived as a job, it was killed from the 
moment its consummation was delayed for further examination. 
It could not stand probing, and died in dread of the operation. 
It being already a corpse, it is not worth while further to em- 
ploy the surgeon's knife, except for the purposes of dissection, 
aud that may well be postponed until the atmosphere is cooler 
and party spirit less rife than at present. In good time it will be 
due to the truth of history, that a full, true and particular setting 
forth of the inside facts should be made, but that time will not 
be well chosen if selected under the suspicion or even possibility 
of party capital being made out of it. The new policy proposed 
for tbe United States, and lately in such imminent danger of be- 
ing carried out, of acquiring foreign and distant territory, Is too 
grave a departure from the teachings and doctrines of the Fathers 
to permit of its final discussion being influenced by any ephem- 
eral interests or passions whatever. So long as the popularity of 
either the late or the existing administration is a live issue, the 
whole truth in regard to the conspiracy by which Hawaii was* 
so nearly put on the road to become a State of the Union, may 
not be wisely or profitably told. Meanwhile no better burial 
place for the whole subject matter could possibly be found than 
a Senate committee room. By Ibe time everybody has been 
heard who will want to be, the American people will have be- 
come heartily sick of the whole thing, and, possibly, will have 
forgotten it. An attentive world listened in wonderment and in 
awe to the marvelous impeachment of Warren Hastings by 
Burke, Fox and Sheridan, but soon nobody cared enough for the 
trial to attend it, and even the officers of Parliament, paid to 
keep their eyes open, fell asleap. The Hawaiian storm in a tea 
cup is safely on the road to a similar fate. 

THE good Presbyterian Occident warns tbe world that a "Syrian, 
known as Rabbi Baba," having ceased to be a PresbyteriaD, 
and having since become an Episcopalian and then a Baptist, is 
a thing to beware of. 



Jan 2". 



SAN" FRANCIS* NEWS I ETTER. 



RICHARD HARDING DAVIS 



THE UNEMPLOYED. 



MR RICHARD HARDING DAVIS, assigned by //nrp,,', 
' England end r*port oo the manners end cus- 
toms of her amiable inhabitants. !i«« done so. end has been giv- 
ing the results of his experiences In literary blossoms wblob .1 1 - 
play, with charming candor and fre-hness. the immeasurable 
depths of Mr. Richard Harding Davis' oonoalt. Davis once prom- 
ised to be a literary success, but it would appear that ho (ell into 
the bands o( a self-laudatory comniiltee. and the result is, the 
young man writes as if for the purpose of nauseating the readers 
Ol Harptr't Really, ihete is no charm In his last article printed 
this month, except for its naive, expresslonful conceit. Mr. Davis 
goes to I. mdon. and. by his own account, London — not the vul- 
gar middle, •■ but the best bread and butter" — falls at his feet, 
and he is on terms of sociable equality with princes of the blood, 
dukes and duchesses, earls and c.iuntesses; pays visits to peers' 
sons in their rooms in Oxford, and patronizingly calls them boys. 
Indeed, wherever Mr. Davis goes, the big I appears, and the Held 
ia nowhere. He blushes for his fellow American so liberally that 
there are no blushes for anybody else. He pities the swagger 
-iiman for not knowing such a nice American gentleman as 
himself, and true to his instincts as a reporter, which would do 
credit to a member of the late Mr. Pickering's paper, he tries to 
extract from the hermetically sealed lips of distinguished English 
officers stories of the Soudan and India. As Mr. Davis knew 
only the •• best bread and butter," we can imagine Lord VVolseley 
asking ibis impertinent and familiar youngster into a corner of 
the room and giving him a history of his African campaign, or 
Lord Roberts detailing with gusto his memorable defeat on the 
first day of his attack on the Peiwar Kotal. But, strange to say, 
while Mr. Davis was attempting to interview these reticent offi- 
cers, his own countrymen were suffusing his face with moss-rote 
blushes by telling them all about our own great war, which 
eclipsed all other recent conflicts of arms. But Mr. Davis has 
found Englishmen rude. They actually turned their backs on 
tbeimmortal maker of Van Bibber, and spoke about things in 
which they were interested, neglecting the great author of " Gal- 
legher and Other Stories." Such neglect iB unpardonable; 
and Mr. Richard Harding Davis, late of Philadelphia and now 
of New York, warns his compatriots that when they go to an 
Englishman's house of the " beat bread and butter" order they 
will be neglected. Mr. Richard Harding Davis says " I told yon 
so," and strolls up to the fourth story to have a quiet flirtation 
with a duchess, or at least a princess of the blood royal. Mr. 
Davis goes to a garden party of the "best bread and butter" 
order, and meets a compatriot rooted to a stone balustrade, white 
he, with a half dozen duchesses and countesses hanging about him, 
promenades the garden, rilling all the swagger men of London 
with envy. They envy his refinement — perhaps his cheek. 
London is famous for having lions, and the suspicion is strong 
that if Mr. Davis did go " to the best bread and butter" he did it 
on the strength of the man wilh the adamant cheek — at any 
rate, he has written himself down as three things — ass, snob and 
cad. 



PROGRESS OF THE BLYTHE CASE. 



THE appeals in the case of Florence Blythe Hinckley vs. Abbie 
Ayres and others, with one exception, were argued and sub- 
mitted in the Supreme Court this week. That exception is the 
entire case for Mrs. Alice Edith Blythe, which, both on her own 
part and against the plaintiff, is not yet before the court. She 
bad an appeal from the judgment, which covers no question in 
which she is interested, but her appeal from the order of Judge 
Coffey refusing a new trial will take up the whole record, includ- 
ing all the testimony on both aides. Then there may be a discus- 
sion of paternity and of widowhood, in which the State and the 
country will be interested, because it will necessarily present the 
case in such aspects as have not so far been discerned by thepub- 
lic. The arguments this week, however, were important on boih 
sides, and the Blythe company, the London Savages, the Gypsy 
claimants, and others, will probably soon ascertain their fate. 
According to one or two of the daily papers, some of the counsel 
for Florence dwelt on Mrs. Blythe's testimony. If so, in resptct 
to that lady, they were outside of the facts before the court, ai d 
nothing they saw fit to utter could have the least influence upon 
the result, legally or morally. There is do rule better understood, 
even among laymen, than tnat counsel must limit themselves to 
the points and to the parties in the particular record they are con- 
sidering. In the Blythe litigation, on the side of the plaintiff, 
that rule has been repeatedly broken. The trouble is that ihe 
estate is too valuable. If it were worth only four or five thou- 
sand dollars instead of four or five millions, it would be dealt with 
in the ordinary way and by the methods which, it is to be pre- 
sumed, will be applied by the Supreme Court. 

JUSTICE BARRtTT of the Supreme Court of New York thinks 
it doubtful that airy, fairy Lillian Russell, el cetera, et cetera, 
has lived "a uniformly good and moral life, within the meaning 
of the law, for five years past." Perhaps, perhaps, Mr. Justice; 
but how about the preceding forty ? 



T ,lr - fact li demonstrated that San Krann.ro contains | a a| now 
i ■,* ■' nl "" t "' r "' boneel men and woman wboia only o ipltal 
ts Mali labor, f..r wblob they can find no employment, Tb« un- 
employed consist „f lhree , „,.„. ,.-,„, |1|t . r( , nr| , ,, whn . 

reason of sickness. „l,| , R e, nr feebleness, would be unable to 
work if employment were found for ihi-m : tbl "Volent 

people and institutions of our city can be depended upon to look 
after. Secondly, there are a number of Indolent, ne'er-do-well 
tramps, vagrants, and criminals, who wool. I not do a fair day's 
work if it were ottered them. These it is the dntv ol the police 
to attend to. The third class is a much larger and very different 
one. that Is worthy of all that can be done to ameliorate its con- 
dition. It consists of men and women able and willing to work 
but unable to find anything to do. Such people are worthy of 
the profoundest sympathy of all whose lines happen to have 
fallen Into pleasanter places. They seek not charity, and beg of 
their fellow men only the right to work in order that they may 
ive That Cod given right no fairly well-to-do man can afford 
to deny them. Society owes its poorer members something, and 
that something is moderately appraised when it is fixed at the 
price of bread in return for honest toil. The necessities of the 
unemployed women are, we believe, being rapidly overtaken by 
the individual and organized efforts of the many estimable ladies 
whom our city contains. The unemployed men were given, per- 
haps, the very best possible assistance under the circumstances 
when by public subscription they were paid one dollar a day for 
work in the Park. Right here comes in the motive for this 
article. Every man who has shown his capacity for work to the 
committee that has this matter in charge, could be usefully and 
promptly employed upon like terms in our Bay counties alone 
This statement is not mere guess-work, but is a matter of which 
we have intimate personal knowledge. Strange as it may appear 
to dwellers in the city, the fact is that a real and urgent demand 
exists for labor in ibe country. If the supply and demand could 
be brought together, the difficulty in regard to the unemployed 
which so sorely distresses our humane people would vanish. If 
the cry for work is urgent in the city, the demand for labor in 
the country is no less so. Besides, if the fact were otherwise, he 
would be a poor orchardist or farmer who could not find some 
good, useful and needed thing for at least one man to do around 
his place, and we know it would be quickly found if any likely- 
looking white workingman were to go in quest of it. Then, 
again, thousands of Chinese and Japanese are to-day occupying 
very desirable positions in the country that would be quickly 
vacated if equally reliable white men could be procured. In this 
direction lies the speediest, the most permanent, and in every 
way the best remedy for the difficulty. 

THE CRUSADE AGAINST SMOKERS. 



TOBACCO is probably the most abused plant of the vegetable 
kingdom, and for many generations the use and abuse of the 
noxious weed has been deplored from the pulpit and denounced 
by the physician ; but in spite of what the goody-goody people say, 
and all that anti-tobacco societies do, the number of smokers is al- 
ways increasing, and it is authentically declared that fashionably 
dressed young ladies may now, any day, be seen in ihe suburban dis- 
tricts of Glasgow smoking cigarettes in the public streets. This is, in- 
deed, very shocking ! One can easily understand the precocious Am- 
erican boys taking to cigarettes; but the very idea of the demure 
looking Scotch lassies taking their daily promenade with a naughty 
cigarette stuck between their rosy lips, and de'il a blush on their 
pretty countenances, is altogether too much for one's gravity, and 
quite beyond all conception! We wonder what poor Bobbie Burns 
would have thought of it. Apropos of the present crusade against the 
smoking of cigarettes by boys ot tender years, one day this week a 
lady was relating, with tears of joy in her motherly eyes, how her 
boy Frank had joined a society which was pie Iged not to use tobacco 
in any shape or form, not to drink intoxicants, or to stone China- 
men, or to indulge in any of the other numerous little pecca- 
dillos so common to the youth of large American cities. The good 
lady had barely finished when Frankie, who, like Mrs. Pardiggle's 
charity children, had been listening with manifest impatience while 
his mother was extolling his virtues, broke in with : " But, mother, 
I didn't want to do it— they made us doit at school!" The boy 
really thought that he had been badly treated in the matter. An 
Australian logician, who is evidently a non-smoker and a local op- 
tionist, and has studied the question from that point of view, recently 
hit upon a most brilliant idea : he seriously proposes that all persons 
who smoke in the public streets should be compelled to take out a 
license, and to pay a fee of ten shillings and sixpence for the privi- 
lege ; and he then proceeds to explain how the revenue of that bard-up 
country would in that way be increased to many thousands of dol- 
lars, which would come out of the pockets of a class of people who 
contribute very little to the public purse. This political economist 
does not say how or where he would have the license carried, but as, 
presumably, it would have to be placed on some conspicuous part of 
the person, probably the band of the smoker's hat would be found 
the best place. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan . 27, 1894. 



PROHIBITION IN CALIFORNIA. 



A GRAVE danger threatens the wine industry of California in 
the advances that are being made by the Prohibitionists in 
some counties of the State. It seems well at this time to bring so 
serious a matter before the attention, not alone of the capitalists 
whose interests are threatened, but of the thoughtful citizen to 
whom the danger to personal freedom appears to be even more 
serious. 

In Lake county the Prohibitionists have passed their law. But 
the interests affected in this case are not large, although to a few 
industrious men the consequences of its adoption will prove dis- 
astrous, practically robbing tbem of the results of many years of 
toil. That any law, passed in a free country and by a free people, 
should do such a thing as this, is a matter for reflection. But 
when we consider the large interests at stake, the immense 
amount of money already invested in the wine industry in the 
various counties in the State — in Napa. Sonoma, Santa Clara and 
the other wine making counties — and the vast potential wealth 
of their yet undeveloped lands, some questions suggest them- 
selves which must certainly be answered in the near future. 
And these answers may mean many things. 

If men are forbidden by the law to sell wine, then no wine can 
be drunk, and none need be manufactured. True, the manufac- 
turer may ship his wine abroad, or into other States, so long as 
the Prohibitionists will permit him to do so. But the passage of 
this law rob3 him of his local market, a matter which, to a poor 
man, is of much importance, his living depending very often upon 
this source of income. In the end, if the Prohibitionists are to 
have their way — the total abolition among all classes of the use 
of alcohol as a beverage— the wine industry of California must 
perish. So long as wine is produced in the State, wine will be 
drunk. And, should this party come into full power, they will 
not, of course, be satisfied until the ends for which they are work- 
ing shall have been attained. That will mean, for California, the 
destruction of her wine industry. This industry, which has been 
successful beyond all precedent, promises in a few years to be of 
immense proportions. Hitherto the manufacturer has had to 
wade chin-deep against a flood of difficulties — the heavy trans- 
portation charges, combinations among dealers, and popular ig- 
norance as to the nature and effects of good wine as compared 
with bad. But they have struggled on, and they are able to-day 
to hold their own. Wherever good California wine finds its way 
into a well-informed market, it is prized and bought. California 
alone among theStates is able to produce the wholesome wine re- 
quired for use by a large majority of the people in the Union, 
without reckoning foreign markets. Bat the doctrine of prohi- 
bition will be to her wine industry as a creeping paralysis — one 
county following another in the lead already taken. It is difficult 
to believe that the common sense of the people will allow Cali- 
fornia to be robbed of so brilliant a future by the unwisdom of 
men whose teaching has no foundation in justice or right reason, 
and the ultimate triumph of whose principles threatens the per- 
sonal freedom of the citizen. 

Are not these majorities getting rash and short-sighted in what 
they are doing? Every sane man knows the danger attending 
the careless use of alcoholic drinks by the unwise, or even by the 
wise. But the right of a local majority to put this heavy brake 
upon the development of an advancing industry, because the use 
of wine may be abused, is another matter. Certainly our majori- 
ties need a wider horizon. It is probable that many of the men 
who vote for prohibition have not adequately considered what 
they are doing. Many of the good and wise among mankind are 
beginning to scent danger. Even the great English G. 0. M. 
(whom for the present I will not call good or wise) begins to think 
that something may be wrong. A majority, he says, may be as 
foolish as a king, and more difficult to handle when trouble 
comes. And, truly, may not a majority tread too close upon the 
heels of Freedom, and cause that august goddess to turn? Major- 
ity will not like it if she does. 

Let it be granted that the purpose of the men who are labor- 
ing so earnestly in the cause of prohibition is altogether good. 
A larger ideal of life and of all social relations is dawning over 
the world, and especially, let us hope, over the widely scattered 
English-speaking races. We want our cities, towns and villages 
to be wholesome, clean and sweet, where women can walk with- 
out molestation or insult. But where the saloon is sovereign, 
these things may not be. 

But in proportion as we dread the evil influences of the saloon, 
it is necessary for us to look abroad and see whether the whole 
cause of our trouble lies really at the doors of alcohol. I answer: 
Certainly it does not. In Italy, in France, in Germany, and in 
England and Scotland they have to face this problem. But with 
a difference. Their lunatic asylums are not so big as ours, nor is 
their murder record ; the chief reason for this being that they have 
more honest drink and less drugs. The drinking houses of nearly 



every nation in the world compare favorably with our saloon. The 
Swiss, the French, the German and the Englisii laborer goes to 
the drinking shop for enjoyment and recreation. Half the even- 
ing long the house is filled with laughter, badinage and song. 
William 8hakespeare and Robert Burns — and, let me add, Charles 
Lamb — knew the delights of a merry night at the tavern. "Shall 
I not take mine ease in mine inn?" That wise man, Garth Wil- 
kinson, writing of the uses of alcohol, says: "Its use is to soften 
us, to make us kinder than our reason and more admissive than 
our candor, and to bring man nearer to man. In vino Veritas; and 
friendships are born of the fruit of the grape. It is the adjunct 
of society, the preparator of inventive idea, the launch of the 
mind from the care and hindrance of the day; for joy has impor- 
tant functions." But all repose and merriment have vanished 
from the American saloon. No song, no, nor even honest laugh- 
ter, salutes the street. Nothing of the sort. But this is the ques- 
tion : Is it honest wine, honest beer, or honest whisky that they 
are drinking? Those who know most about the matter will 
answer always, "No," and again, "No; it is drugged." More 
than half our trouble is caused by the character of the liquor per- 
mitted to be sold in the saloons. Hundreds of men in Scotland 
drink as heavily as the hardest drinkers here, but with results 
less disastrous. Good whisky intoxicates, but drugged whisky 
maddens. The man whom it has mastered becomes less a drunk- 
ard than a dangerous wild animal, of whom his best friends have 
often the most reason to be afraid. The same is true of an im- 
mense proportion of the wine sold in this State. New wine, 
loaded with fusil oil, is sold to men who are altogether ignorant 
of the consequences of drinking it, and so drink to their undoing. 
In older countries this is otherwise. A Swiss peasant's wife, if 
she found her husband drinking such stuff, would go in the 
night with a gimlet to the barrel. When her husband got back 
his senses he would give thanks to the woman who had saved 
him. " These men are of new wine," was said on a memorable 
historic occasion. That is, in the judgment of the speaker, they 
were fools and blackguards to be tampering with a maddening 
poison. 

Some help could, perhaps, be given us by a wise statesman, 
who should have thoroughly realized the immense difference in 
the effects of good and bad liquor. An initial step in this direc- 
tion might be taken by the introduction of a measure which 
should give the State complete control, not of the saloons, but of 
the liquors which are sold in them. What hinders that the 
character of all intoxicants sold to the people, either by whole- 
sale or retail dealers, should be made to pass a searching exami- 
nation by the State Analyst? This measure would violate no law 
of freedom, and would be legitimate. It is distinctly the duty of 
governments to protect the citizen against such wholesale fraud 
as is practiced everywhere in the sale of drugged drinks, under 
pretense of wholesome liquor. It would have some advantage 
over the Gothenburg system, which turns the State or local gov- 
ernment into a liquor seller — a proceeding of doubtful legality 
and great unwisdom. But the measure proposed must be made 
drastic, and should be under the immediate control of the people, 
or the bribing of officials would undo it. 

On this wise: Let it be lawful for, say, half a dozen reputable 
citizens to demand an examination by the State Analyst of any 
intoxicant suspected to be impure, whether sold at the saloon, 
the store, or the wholesale wharehouse, and this without previous 
warning to the seller. If the intoxicant is found to be drugged 
or unfit for consumption, let it be condemned, as we condemn 
stinking meat, and the seller punished, not by fine, but by imprison- 
ment. If it is objected that such a law would pitch seven-eighths 
of the liquor in San Francisco into the bay, I answer: "Good! 
Nothing better could be desired." But it would save many a 
hundred fools from the mad-house, and many a good woman 
from heart-break. 

The tendency of the legislation proposed would be continually 
to bring up the character of California wines, and, by prohibiting 
the sale of bad stuff, would help the honest manufacturer, and 
crush fraud. It would hold back the flood of vile whisky that is 
annually poured into the State, and put the power of controlling 
this evil into the hands of men to whom justice and freedom ap- 
pear to be objects better worth righting for than those proposed 
by the Prohibitionists. It would be something worth doing, and 
a step forward, to have created an opinion throughout every 
State in the Union and in the world, that no vile drinks can be 
bought or sold in the State of California. 

The use of alcohol in itself as a beverage is not an evil, but dis- 
tinctly a good. History laughs at the ridiculous pretensions of 
the Prohibtionists. All the strong races of the world, in every 
age, have used alcohol as a beverage. The Egyptians brewed 
beer thousands of years before the Christian era. A wine press 
was discovered recently in Lower Palestine, belonging, it is af- 
firmed by Professor Flinders Petrie, its discoverer, to a pre-historic 
age. When Ctesar invaded Britain he found a race of men intel- 
ligent and brave. Cresar says of these Britons: » They brewed a 



Jan 27, 1894. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



coarse wine of malt and hops, to which they were greatly ad- 
dicted. *' All the I.atln noea use alcohol as a beveratir, and have 
done to through their whole taUtorj. 80 ha> I So also 

has the Hebrew, and those powerful races, tbe Teuton and the 
Slav. In lena of thousands of French and (ierruan village* the 
wine-shop of to-day is not a terror. 

Tbe civilization of this age, in all its splendor and its agony— 
in tbe stun and strife of its perpetual endeavor, in its hope and 
promise of to-morrow — rests solely upon tbe shoulders of these 
strong races. They are gods in their power of endurance, of hope 
and of strife. But they all use alcohol as a beverage. 

But what are we to say of the races who abbor alcohol and 
never touch it? Tbe Turk is a ;iar and rogue; he is cruel as 
death; he will dash a new-born babe against tbe stones. *nd 
laugh. But be would not touch a drink of whisky to sav*, 113 
life. The Arab, who passes his whole existence in hunting tribes 
of helpless negroes under the 511ns of Africa, and leaves a trail of 
human bones across the burning continent, drinks nothing stronger 
than coffee. Tbe Larrihin of Australian towns and cities beats 
tbe hoodlum of California to tbe ropes. Nothing is too bad, too 
bold, too infamous for him. A dozen of them will hold a town in 
subjection. But his common drink is a cup of tea or coffee. Only 
when anything is to be done which demands a cooler head and 
steadier hand thaj usual — some murder or outrage too shameful 
for record — then be likes a glass of — lemonade. 

This prohibition law is an attempt by a majority to coerce men 
into a course of action which they do not approve. Of course it 
does not compass its end. Free men wilt not bear it. Id Lake 
county they know perfectly well what is going on. There is 
probably more whisky being drunk — and that of the vilest — to-day 
than before tbe law was passed. Not openly, but in wretched 
back parlors, in holes and corners, out of which the man who 
drinks has to sneak like a thief — and, if he is questioned, to lie. 
This is a deadly wrong — a wrong more terrible and far-reaching 
than any amount of drunkenness. Is it a light thing that by the 
instrumentality of a feeble land we should educate the youth of 
the State to be sneaks and liars? The young hoodlum crawls 
into the vile den prepared for him, drinks confusion to the law 
which he despises and defies, and grins in the face of the sheriff 
whom be meets in the next street. The attempt to save him, or 
in any way work his redemption by such a law as this, is a piece 
of ridiculous fooling. 

This law is more than foolish— it is tyrannous on the poor. 
Seven-eighths of the farmers in this State cannot afford to stock 
their cellars with liquor, and half of that number have no cellars 
to stock. But they have to work hard and ride long distances 
into town, and when they get there have a right to a glass of 
wine or beer, if they want it, and can pay for it. But this right 
is denied to every poor man in a prohibition county, although no 
charge of disorderly conduct has ever been made against him. 
That is, he is punished, and his action as a free citizen brought 
into contempt, by the will of a narrow-thoughted and short- 
sighted majority of good people. Meanwhile the rich man, who 
is able to lay in stock, can drink all he wants without molestation. 

Do the excellent ladies and very foolish men who are fighting 
for the extension of this absurd experiment in legislation know 
just what they are doing ? Suppose that we turn tbe tables. 
Alcohol is not the only intoxicant, nor the most dangerous. The 
doctors are beginning to whisper things which it is not pleasant 
to hear. Nay, they do not whisper, but tell us plainly, that 
women everywhere are using drugs in a way that bodes no good 
for the future of womanhood. Physicians in London and the 
large cities of the Union are saying these things. The great ladies 
who sail into ball-rooms with eyes brighter than the jewels they 
wear, and the girls that flirt and sing in the dives — they are all 
included. It is terrible. Is not this also an evil which should be 
intrusted to the sovereign majority for its removal ? Would ma- 
jority like all that would follow if it were so intrusted ? Would 
the ladies of California like to be thus addressed by the policemen 
in the street: " Madam, your eyes are too bright, your walk is 
unsteady, and the low droop of your eyelid does not please me. 
What is that small white bottle in your reticule? Chloral, I 
swear! Madam, I am an officer of the law. You are arrested, 
and must come with me before the Judge and to jail. You have 
broken tbe law of the State, which does not permit the use of in- 
toxicating drugs. The people are tired of the heavy taxation en- 
tailed by your wicked folly. Our huge asylums are crowded 
with women who have drugged themselves into madness." Is 
that a fancy picture ? It is nothing of the sort. Tbe Prohibition- 
ist has got in the thin edge of the wedge. When the wedge is 
driven home that is what it will mean — that and a good deal 
more. 

The local press of Lake county is full of quotations from the 
decisions of the courts in various cases as to whether the indivi- 
dual citizen has a right to make wine and sell it, or whether no 
such right exists. We are being pelted with the names of great 
divines, great statesmen, and great philanthropists, all of whom 
agree that majorities have a right to put their sovereign heel upon 



the necks of minorities, In order 10 Improve the morals and man- 
ners of the evil world. I am not learned In these decisions, and 
I do not love these men A few months *«<>. a brave man itood 
np in the Eoglltb House of l.ord« (the late Archbishop U 
and, ipaaklng against the local option act, said: •• If I am asked 
whether I will have England aohi-r, <»r Kneland free, I answer, I 
will have England free.*' That Is the man I love. I like to repeat 
that sentence out loml. with the alteration of a word : " If I am 
asked whether I will have America sober, or America free, I an- 
swer, I will have America free. " When I read that Tom and 
Pick, because there are two of them, have a right to clap bands 
on Harry and control his action because he is only one, I begin to 
gasp. 1 snuff the air of n free liltlc island away there in the 
black Atlantic, where 1 was born; where our fathers wrote Lib- 
erty large, in red letters, across the land and the seas, and blazed 
it into the eyes and hearts of the men who first peopled this 
America. The times seem changing. No doubt it is good to 
have these courts and Senates ruling over us. 

" Alice," in " Wonderland," came upon two old gentlemen sit- 
ting together twiddling their thumbs from right to left, and around 
their waists respectively was written, "Tweedledum" and 
" Tweedledee." " Do you always do so ? " asks Alice. " No," 
says Tweedledee, twiddling his thumb from left to right; » some- 
times we do so." 

We have many bij> social problems waiting for us in the stormy 
vestibule of to-morrow. The liars and thieves, tariff-mongers 
and trusts, have all to be dealt with, and swiftly too. But we 
cannot stop lying by sewing op mens' lips with pack-thread. Nor 
shall we stop the use of alcoholic drinks with such a fad as tbe 
prohibition law. We must struggle on. But oh I if Tweedledum 
and Tweedledee would try to help us a little more and give up 
that unfortunate habit of twiddling their thumbs from right to 
left, and again from left to right! Then we should do better. 
No doubt they are wise men. They might even explain to us 
what Freedom means, and what it was that burned, like a living 
coal, in the hearts of the men who paced the deck of the May- 
flower, as she bore on her solitary way across lonely seas, in search 

Of — WHAT ? AHGLO-CALIFORNIAN. 

Lower Lake, Lake County, January, 1893. 




It Isn't 
The Same As, 



u 

and it isn't " as good as," 
no matter what any grocer 
may tell you about any imi- 
tation of Pearline. He makes 
more money on it — but do you 
want to ruin your clothes for 
his profit? The imitations of 
Pearline are sold at a lower price, 
naturally, for they're not as good. Some are 
dangerous, and would be clear at any price. 

There's nothing equal to Pearline, the origi- 
nal washing compound, which saves the most 
work in washing and cleaning, and doesn't do 
harm. Pearline is never peddled, and offers 
no prizes. Every package is a prize in itself. 374 



JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS 

PROPRIETORS OP THE 

CITY IRON WORKS. 



Office 51 Fremoni Street, 

SJL35T FBAUCISCO, - - 
Manufacturers of and Dealers in 



C^.L. 



Boilers, Engines, Pumps and Machinery of Every Description- 
patent Lead-Lined Coupled Tubing, for use as 

Water Pipe, for Sale Cheap 

PACIFIC TOWEL CO!&F-A.lSrT 

9 LICK PLACE, 
Furnishes Clean Towel* at the following low rates: 

Glean Hand Towels each week, $1.00 per month; 12 Clean Hand Towels 
each week, $1.50 per month; 4 Clean Roller Towels each week, $1.00 
6 month; 6 clean Roller Towels each week, $1.25 per month. 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



Jan . 27, 1894. 




WD 



*We Obev no Wand but Pleasure's.' 



THE third production of the Palmer Company at the Baldwin, 
while differing in essential particulars from its two prede- 
cessors, does not fall below either in its power of holding an 
audience. In somewhat lighter vein of development than Lady 
Windermere* s Fan, or The Dancing Girl, the underlying principle of 
A Pair of Spectacles is deeper than that in either, namely, the 
faith of humanity in human honor and sincerity. The lesson is 
a direct one — not veiled and involved according to the unwritten 
canons of modern literary art— and it hits the mark straight in 
the centre. The two old brothers — one hardened and rendered 
distrustful beyond the necessary hardening and distrust-planting 
process of years; the other kept young by a soft heart as ready 
for tender impressions as that of youth and an absolutely childish 
faith and trust in all about him — are typical portraits, and like all 
types concentrating the qualities of many men in one individual, 
probably each per se something of an exaggeration. Admit- 
ting this, however, both brothers are interesting as types and 
strongly individual in characterization. The two young men are 
as different, but more than this their differences are the natural 
outgrowth of the contrasted paternal regimen to which the 
respective sons have been subjected. As adapted from the 
French, the young wife of an old man is notso incongruous as to 
our Anglo-Saxon ideas of a love-story. But even in this element 
Mr. Grundy has so fitted bis "adaptation" to its English dress 
that the incongruity is explained away by the soft heart and 
childlike trust aforesaid, which, when age can retain them, give 
it so many points of contact with youth that its exterior signs 
become almost unnoticeable. The character drawing throughout 
is equally distinctive. Whatever success as an adaptation Mr. 
Sydney Grundy's work may deserve, it certainly merits com- 
mendation as a play full of human interest, full of marked yet 
natural characterization, and in spite of the seeming too rapid 
transitions in both leading parts, necessitated by the limited time 
of the play, nowhere defying the probabilities. 

The notable fact that from first to last the interest never flags, 
is due perhaps as much to the players as to the play. Mr. Stod- 
dart and Mr. E. M. Holland, as the two brothers, have the burden 
of the acting to sustain. Both are admirable, both doubly to be 
admired as somewhat out of their ordinary line. A strong in- 
fusion of the high-comedy element in the part of Mr. Benjamin 
Goldfinch shows Mr. Stoddart possessed of a keen sense of humor 
and a rarely happy gift in its interpretation, while the gruff 
Uncle Gregory with his harsh, unpolished manner is in as strong 
contrast to the social swells generally personated by Mr. Holland. 
Miss May Brookyn makes a charming and beautiful Mrs. Gold- 
finch, and while giving to the part no special force or distinctive- 
ness, makes It perhaps for that all the more natural. Walden 
Rarnsay plays the part of the hard-pushed and not always ingen- 
uous Dick with much ability, and the more favored son gives 
Edward Bell his best opportunity, that of personating a pleasant 
young gentleman with no salient peculiarities or unregulated in- 
clinations — in short, himself. Herbert Mill ward adds to first- 
class ability as stage manager a talent for character acting, and 
makes a strong bit of the old butler, as do Messrs. Fawcett and 
Fax as respectively the friend and the bootmaker of Goldfinch. 
F. A. Thompson, Miss Rose Barrington, and Miss Ann Orhart 
complete the cast, Miss Barrington making but a weak and 
ineffective picture of Percy's affianced, Lucy Lorimer. 
* * * 

As a curtain-raiser, Miss Julia Arthur and Messrs. Stoddart, 
Bell, Ramsay, and Fax play the well known and touching little 
drama, One Touch of Nature. The feeling and passion of Mr. Stod- 
dart's acting of Wm. Penn Holder iyamong the best, as well as 
the best remembered of his many strong characters, and Julia 
Arthur gave a new proof of her versatility as well as of her per- 
sonal charm in the rendering of the superficial actress who needed 
"one touch of nature" to sound the depths of dramatic possibil- 
ities. 

The California is having a continuation of the good first week's 
business with the stirring naval drama, Ths Ensign. No school- 
boy in San Francisco would be losing the few hours spent in see- 
ing this play, with its strong American sentiment, its lessons of 
heroism, loyalty, and patriotism, and its revival of veneration for 
the great men who piloted the ship of state through the troubled 
waters of civil war. We have laughed down almost everything, 
and when we shall laugh down American patriotism we shall 
lose as a nation that lofty status which we have already pretty 
well dispensed with as individuals. Let the Ensign continue to 
wrap himself in the American flag, and to run his ready sword 
through its assailants, even at the risk of turning heroism into 
heroics and pathos into bathos, rather than that our boys grow 
up to sneer at patriotism as an effete virtue relegated to drama 
and romance and unsuited to the American citizen's daily wear. 



The first of the season's Carr-Beel Popular Concerts took place 
at Golden Gate Hall on Saturday last. The programme was de- 
voted entirely to Grieg. The peculiar depth and tension of this 
composer and the difficulty of interpretation are at once a chal- 
lenge and an inspiration to musicians. The executants — Mrs. 
Carr and Messrs. Beel, Wisroer, Janlus, and Heine — evidently felt 
the spirit of both incitements, and the first and third numbers 
were as thoroughly satisfactory to the large and attentive audi- 
ence as they must have been to the performers. Particularly 
enjoyable was the sonata for piano and violin, op. 13, by Mrs. 
Carr and Mr. Beel. It is a delight to hear these two artists play 
together, so perfect is their accord, both in interpretation and 
execution. An old Norwegian Romance for two pianos, played 
by Mrs. Carr and Miss Hulda Andersen, was not quite so happy 
a selection. The young player acquitted herself excellently, but 
the piece, while it would make a charming accompaniment to 
one's reading, writing, or day-dreams, is a trifle tedious as a con- 
cert piece. 

The next "Saturday Pop" will be given at the same place, Feb- 
ruary 3d. 

* * * 

Notwithstanding that no falling off could be seen in the popu- 
larity of the holiday spectacle at the Tivoli, it has been withdrawn 
and Millcecker's bright opera, The Beggar Student, replaced it on 
Monday night. The unusual number of beautiful airs and set 
pieces render this essentially a musical opera, and the rendering 
by the Tivoli orchestra alone would be a genuine treat to a music- 
lover, without any dramatic accessory. It is, however, well 
played and sung by the very competent company now at the 
Tivoli, and the appointments and other details of the production 
are, as usual, excellent. The next opera will be another musical 
favorite here, Nanon. 

The Wigwam is entertaining its large audiences with a laugha- 
ble skit on the escaped bandit subject, entitled Evans, Morrell and 
Scott. The long list of specialty people includes some of the best- 
known names in that line in the United States. A matinee is 
given on Sunday at 2 p. m. The performance of the Japanese 
troupe is remarkable and alone is worth an evening. 

* * * 

The Yosemite Panorama, at the corner of Tenth and Market 
streets, will be a boon of those of our numerous Midwinter Fair 
visitors, who cannot wait for the opening of travel to the real 
valley in the spring. None need return home without a view of 
the Valley and its scenic wonders, almost as realistic as nature it- 
self. 

Mr. Bernhard Mollenbauer, violin virtuoso, will give a concert 
at Metropolitan Hall, January 31st, under the management of 
Mr. Albert Marks. Mr. Mollenhauer holds a high place in the 
estimation of the Eastern musical critics, a leading Boston paper 
according him "the palm of excellence" at a late musical festival 
in that music-loving city. 

Manuel Greenberg, so long and favorably known as secretary 
and press representative for Manager Bouvier at the Baldwin, 
will hereafter act in the same capacity for both Mr. Hayman's 
theatres, the Baldwin and California. » Mannie" is not only a 
pleasant young gentleman to meet, but he has business talent 
and energy which it will take about two theatres to absorb. 

* # * 

The opening of the Standard Theatre — the old home of min- 
strelsy — by a minstrel company headed by Billy Emerson, is 

among the impending amusement schemes. James O'Neill 

will be the next attraction at Stockwell's Theatre. John T. 

Kelly, in McFee of Dublin, will follow The Ensign at the California. 
— Arthur Moulton, who became very popular here as a come- 
dian, with Frank Daniels and in Hoss and Hoss, plays the princi- 
pal role in A Railroad Ticket, a farce-comedy soon due at the Cal- 
ifornia. Next season Mr. Moulton will star in his own play, A 
Dark Horse A Woman'' s Revenge will be the Baldwin's produc- 
tion for the week beginning February 5th, Alabama to follow 

February 12th. Paderewski's new songs are pronounced 

"charming." Will some of our ambitious local musicians give 

us a chance to hear them? The Misses Albu sail on the Aus- 

tralia from Hawaii February 3d, and will give a series of con- 
certs here on their arrival. They have made more money than 

any artists who have visited the Islands. One of the most 

costly souvenirs ever distributed was given out January 22d at 
the twentieth presentation in its new garb of the brilliant holiday 
extravaganza, "1492," at Palmer's Theatre, New York. The 
souvenir was a bronze statue nine inches high of Theresa Vanghn 

as Fraulein, the waif, in that play. Why does not one of our 

popular theatres secure a return of Edward Harrigan, one of the 
most artistic as well as genuinely humorous of special comedians? 
Both Mr. Harrigan and his plays are among the •' things that are 

missed."< Lillian Lewis is making a tour of the Southern States 

in Good- Bye Sweetheart, under the management of Lawrence 
Marston. — Patti Rosa's engagement at Stockwell's Theatre 
opens to-night. 



Jan. 27, 1894. 



>\\ FRANCISCO NEWS T.KTTKR. 



GOTHAM GOSSIP. 

Nkw York, Jan. IS, 1894. 

THE family of Benatnr Stewart bare been prominent this week 
in Washington society. Mr. and Mrs. Mayo Har.eltine gave 
a dinner on Tuesday mgbt in honor of tbe silver Senator, ami on 
tbe same evening If In Bessie Stewart gave a dinner for rosebuds 
like herself. Mr. Truxlon Urate, late Minister to Persia, was the 
only Californian present. Tbe Fields seem not at all discomfitted 
by tbe fact that one of that UlusUiona ilk languishes at present in 
Ludlow-street Jail, but tbey pursue their serene social way with- 
out embarrassment. 

Tbe knighting of dear old Mr. Booker should have occurred 
long ago. according in the opinion of Cahfornians, among whom 
tbe genial Consul Booker lived so long. But it has come at last, 
like all good things, and many and hearty are tbe congratulations 
that have poured in upon Sir William and Lady Booker at tbeir 
apartments in the Breroort House, where they have lived for sev- 
eral years. 

The Bachelors' Ball to-nipht at ihe Hotel Waldorf will be one 
of the winter's events. The ball will be a late one, and several 
dinners will precede it. The cotillion favors are ostrich feathers 
and artificial flowers. Mrs. Ogden Mills is one of the ladies who 
has been chosen to receive the guests. 

Miss Mills, of Menlo — "Addie," as she nsed to be called — is 
here, staying at the Murray Hill Hotel. Her remarkable beauty 
bas made something of a sensation, and there is no doubt about 
her being tbe handsomest young woman whom tbe West has 
sent to grace New York society. It may be a close running 
between her and Mrs. Robinson (Miss Ivers), but I think the 
classic type of Miss Mills would prevail before tbe judges. Mrs. 
Robinson is, by the way, out of health, and her mother-in-law, 
Mrs. J. Hood Wright, has deferred her projected reception until 
February. 

At one of the charity entertainments yesterday, Mrs. Doremus' 
dramatization of Mrs. Gertrude Atherton's clever story, "Mrs. 
Pendleton's Four-in-Hand," was produced, with Miss Elsie de 
Wolfe as tbe fascinating widow. It made a hit. 

Charity is tbe one topic of conversation now, and the generos- 
ity of New York people is certainly to be commended. The 
World free bread fund was benefited yesterday by a gift of three 
hundred and fifty dollars — sufficient to buy seven thousand loaves 
of bread. The money was sent to the fund in memory of poor 
little Henry Janin.Jr., who died last Saturday. Death has also 
carried away this week Nelson Fassett, Senator Sloat Fassett's 
father, and thus father-in-law of Miss Crocker, Mrs. Gil- 
lig's Bister. Mrs. E. B. Crocker and Mrs. Gillig are, by 
the way, charmingly settled for the winter in the Barlow House, 
Irving Place and Gramercy Park. It is one of the very delightful 
old parts of New York, where the exclusive most delight to con- 
gregate. 

Poor Clay Greene must thank his stars that he is away from 
New York during the production of A Maid of Plymouth. Mr. 
Greene is guilty of the libretto, but there are.it must be said, 
extenuating circumstances in the way of occasional (alas! in- 
frequent) songs and repartees which are truly witty. Mr. Thos. 
Pearsall Thorne, who wrote the music, is, I hope, a pachyderm — 
otherwise he must have been flayed by the disdainful criticisms, 
or rather notices, of his maiden opera. Tbere are some catchy 
melodies, but then, " I Want to be An Angel" is catchy, too, and 
tbe calibre of his melodies is not weightier than that infant Sun- 
day-school hymn, Bat Mr. Thorne is a young man dans le monde, 
and has society with him. It sat in the boxes and overflowed 
tbe stalls on Monday night, and every one present heard tbe 
opera twice, as every number sufficiently detached from the rest 
to be a number was wildly encored. Such is fame, and thus is it 
acquired! 

I wrote you recently of Lieut-Commander Chenery's illness. 
He bas lately bad a relapse, and has been in a precarious condi- 
tion. "Ned" Taylor, bis old friend, is in constant and devoted 
attendance. 

Senator Newlands is at the Holland House, E. P. Gerke at tbe 
Imperial, Mr. and Mrs. Van Sickle at the Normandie, all regis- 
tered from California. 

Mrs. Ernest Dickman (Miss Grattan), who returned from Cali- 
fornia last month after five months in Napa Valley, has been 
confined to the house almost constantly since her arrival, by her 
own and her children's illness. Mrs. Grattan is with her. 

I suppose you have beard of tbe agitation on Randall's Island 
apropos of Lieutenant Jungen, who married handsome, dashing 
Kate Woods several years ago in San Francisco. In bis capacity 
as Assistant Superintendent of the House of Refuge he exercised 
a discipline which the inmates thought entirely too rigorous, and 
rebelled thereat with such violence and unanimity that a Board 
of Inquiry has been organized to investigate the matter. Perhaps 
Mr. Jungen is too much the naval officer still, with his severe 
ideas of discipline, for sometimes deep-sea dull' is not palatable 
ashore. Passe-Partout. 



Cougbs and Colds. Those who are suffering from Coughs, Colds, Sore 
Throat, etc., should try Brown's Bronchial Troches. Sold only in boxes 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

UH*T»i»»00.. Pro»fMon. tt.l. Oomoi M»n»err 

Monday. J«iii!«r\ . lanooj 

LOTTIE COLLINS, 

Id conjunction with the (i 

HOWARD ATHENvEUM 

i \u v COMPANY 

-II ..t I nr,.,,, , i.rr,,,,.,, ^ r „. u 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 



A i. HayxanACo Lmmm «nd ProprfeWi 

A. M. PALMERS STOCK COMPANY. 
pow°"f*f"."r«mi "*' y -""''• 0n "" 1 Kcvlv '> 1 of Henry Arthur Jones' 

SAINTS and SINNERS. 

The great success of the Palmer Company. 

Monday. February ,M)i. -A MIHIAJi'S BEVESOE, By Henry Pettit. 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kbslino Bros . . Proprietors and Managers. 

To-night! Grand production of Mlllocker's charming opera 

THE BEGGAR STUDENT. 

Reappearance of ROBERT DUNBAR. 
Next Opera— NASON. 
Popular Prices 25and50c 



WIGWAM THEATRE, 



Mrs. Chas. Meyer, Proprietor. Frenk and Albert Meyer, Business Managers. 
San Frar Cisco's Recognized Vaudeville Family Resort 

Gornmencmg Monday evening, January 2sth-First time here of Doloh 
Levino's grand production, called ' 

PIS-A-4. 
f^ e T.?,T iC £ W| II "PPC" Jhe following specialties: Montgomery Brumage 
and Little Jim, the comedy caterer, supreme. Al. H. Clements and Mamie 
Boyd, premier \ankee comedy duo. Apollo Quartette, in original songs, 
medleys and imitations Bob Leando and J. F. Stack, America's greatest 
triple horizontal bar performers. Bailey-The Dawsons-May, character 
change and comedy sketch artists. Elwood. the male soprano. Gilbert 
and Goldie. Miss Beatrice James, the talented operatic vocalist and bal- 
ladist. Dolph and Susie Levino. Al. Leech. 

Every evening at 8. Matinee Saturday and Sunday at 2. 

General admission, 10c. Reserved seats, 25c. Opera chairs 3;c 

Matinee Prices— General admission, 10c. Opera chairs, 2 5c. 

Gootl-Bye to Hie 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

After Wednesday, January 31st, it will cense to exist, but it will go out 
amid a burst of glory. The last show will be the best show, and it will 
consist of the 

PRESS CLUB'S 

ANNUAL ENTERTAINMENT, Wednesday afternoon, January 31st. 

All the players in town have volunteered. The Iowa Band will play. 
Great stars will sing and recite and the people will have to cheer Here 
is a partial list of thote who will participate: A M. Palmer's Stock Com- 
pany, Boston Howard Athenaeum Company, Tlvoli Opera Company Or- 
pheum Specialty Company, and Billy Emerson. 

David Star Jordan will tell his famous Story of the Salmon. 

Tickets on sale in prominent business houses. Reserved seats may be 
obtained at the Baldwin Theatre, after January 26th. Doors open at 1 
o'clock. 



GOLDEN GATE HALL — 625 Sutter St. 

Thursday evening, February 1, 1*94, at 8 o'clock. First Concert given by 

ALHAMARA BANDURRIA 

CLUB and LAS GUITARRISTAS, under the direction of Prof. J. Sancho 
and Prof. J. Lombardero; agisted by Miss M. P. Kuner, mezzo, Seuor 
Rinaldo Rebagliati, violin virtuoso, Mr. Frank Coffin, tenor. 

Tickets 50 cents. For sale at Sherman & Clay'B music store. No re- 
served seats. 

THE GRANDEST ON EARTH. SEE 

YOSEMITE PANORAMA, 

(Corner of Tenth and Market Streets.) 
NOW OPEN. Admission S5cts 

IIIIIANRFTinARn The En glish actress, coaches ladies and 
LILLinil U\-UUn\\u, gentlemen for the dramatic profession; ap- 
pearances arranged. SHAKESPEAREAN ACADEMY, 1007 California 
Street, opposite the Flood Mansion. 



THE 
BANJO. 



Its harmony and technic expounded by 
ASHTON P. STEVENS, 

ROOM 8, 26 MONTGOMERY STREET. 

KM1DC Bush * Gerts Flnnos 
I1HD£ Parlor Organs 

HAINES ;mstallments Rentals 

A. 1. Bancroft & Co. 
803 Sutter St., S.F. 



PIANOS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEif 



Jan. 27, 1894. 



Jr/^ looker-op. 

THE Looker-On, strolling down Market street last Saturday 
afternoon, witnessed tbe following scene: A pretty girl, about 
fourteen years old, was threading her way through the crowd. 
She was well dressed, and had rosy cheeks and quantities of 
fluffy blonde hair. Sbe was alone, and she walked faster than 
the crowd in which she was submerged. Sbe had but just passed 
the Looker-On when a smallish man, about thirty-eight or forty 
years old, fastidiously dressed, and having all the indications cf 
a society man, brushed past tbe Looker-On, disturbing the calm 
perpendicularity of the latter's tall frame. Tbe little chap looked 
sharply at tbe child, his quick glance taking in every detail of 
her appearance. Then he stepped up close to her, and for a while 
walked beside her without making a demonstration. Presently 
he looked her long and hard in the face. The child blushed, but 
kept her eyes straight ahead. Then (the crowding of the people 
increasing) he pressed his arm against her, nudging her furtively. 
She blushed deeper, kept her glance ahead, and increased her 
pace. The male, keeping pace with her, put out the elbow near- 
est her, and pressed it against her in front of her arm which was 
nearest him. She suddenly stopped and looked around helplessly, 
and the well-dressed little gentleman, after staring back at her a 
moment, slipped away into the crowd, while the child, now pale 
and frightened, struck across the muddy street without waiting 
to reach a crossing. And this, good mothers of San Francisco, 
happens twenty times a day when you permit your little daugh- 
ters to go unprotected down Market street! When tne Almighty, 
kinder to them than to you, shall have furnished them with Mem- 
ory to protect their young daughters, may He at tbe same time 
put a flea in the robe which you wear in purgatory! 
* * * 
There is a wee bit of dissention brewing in the Bohemian 
Club over the coming election of officers. Before the new board 
shall have run its course, the club will be in its new building, and 
so it will be quite an honor for some one to say that he was the 
first President under the new roof. W. Greer Harrison, Ned 
Hamilton, Peter Robertson and several other Bohemians of the 
good old bohemian type have been spoken of as leading candi- 
dates, with Mr. Harrison slightly in the lead. But now comes 
Horace Piatt, of the Pacific-Union Club (having a membership in 
the Bohemian Club also), with advanced ideas regarding the man- 
agement of the disciples of the owl. Mr. Piatt is of the opinion 
that tbe Bohemian Club should be run on the same principles as 
the Pacific-Union, in order to be successful, and has imbued the 
un-boheroian members of tbe Bohemian Club with that idea. 
Mr. Piatt intends to make a hard fight for the Presidency, and 
this is the time true Bohemians must muster up their forces or 
lose. 

There drifts hither a rumor that a certain famous lawsuit, in 
which a fashionable modiste of London was plaintiff and a beauti- 
ful California heiress defendant, has been settled without trial. 
The amount at issue, it will be remembered, was very large, and 
it was declared that the chief objection to the payment of the bill 
was tbe exorbitant charge for " trimmings." It is a pity, for tbe 
sake of the young lady herself, that the case was not permitted to 
come to trial, for the evidence would have removed all question 
as to the character of the trimmings. Tbis assertion is made be- 
cause it is so well known that many of tbe rich and fashionable 
women of London, as well as rich and fashionable Americans so- 
journing there, are sufficiently familiar with the meaning of the 
item » trimmings " never to think of calling for an itemized ac- 
count. Whether or not this has anything to do with the flaming 
face and rather befuddled tongue with, which Madame some- 
times leaves her dressmaker's shop, is a matter which it would 
be as unnecessary as indelicate to discuss. 

Eugene Field, the Chicago poet, has paid San Francisco a short 
visit and is now in Southern California, where he will remain for 
a few weeks and then visit San Francisco again. Field is one of 
the quietest men living, and though the newspaper men try to 
draw him out he is as voiceless as a clam. But he is a thinker. 
He is the man who made George Pullman, of Palace car repute, 
famous with his Marquis de Pullman stories; he convulsed 
Chicago with laughter over the literary and artistic pretensions 
which they made. He is a curious character. No one ever meets 
him but be is chewing tobacco, and he is either about to give up 
the habit or has just started in with it again. He is a tall, thin, 
smooth-faced man, with a quiet, blue eye. He carries his 
shoulders up to his ears and is always looking for grangers with 
whom be can bet that he can light bis cigar on a street lamp 
without uncurling the spinal spring in his back. He is the author 
of the remark that God gave a newspaper man friends so that he 
might exercise his talent for ridicule in safety. 



The Looker-On no longer is vain of his aristocratic and intel- 
lectual appearance. Not long ago he visited the inaane 
asylum at Agnews, taking in the sewing-room on bis rounds. 
In this room are docile patients who can sew, and who, besides 
sewing, live in the vacant world of their fanciful thoughts. Be- 
fore entering the room the conductor said: 

"Just to see what effect it will have, I am going to introduce 
you to tbese women as tbe Prince of Wales." 

The Looker-On agreed, and was so introduced with a mighty 
flourish. The poor women looked up and regarded the stranger 
with momentary interest, and then their eyes dropped to their 
work again — there were too many Princes of Wales, George 
WashiDgtons and Napoleon Bonapartes about the institution to 
make one more an object of special regard. After a little de- 
sultory talk, the conductor, addressing an old lady named Betty 
Gunn, asked: 

"Well, Betty, you have seen the great Prince of Wales at last. 
What do you think of him?" 

"Oh," replied Betty, in an indifferent tone, and with a careless 

toss of her head, "he looks to me just like an ordinary d d 

fool." 



I'm but a lowly footpad, 

An' I'm 'umble an' I'm meek; 

But I want to see the blamed galoot bad 

Wot I run ag'inst last week; 

I struck 'ini arful 'ard, I did, 

An' wot you think the coot 'ad? 

I thought as 'ow 'e'd pungled 

A pocketful of gold; 

But there's just where I fearful bungled 

And got owdacious sold: 

Them coins was lead-filled brass, they was- 

That's w'y I'm so befungled. 

If this 'ere thing's permitted, 

Us business men'll kick; 

That job it knocked me silly, it did, 

An' made me pious sick: — 

My 'eart'a too trustin' for to deal 

With folks wot ain't thick-witted. 



It is only to a few of his friends that variously tahnted Joseph 
D. Bedding grants admission to bis private apartments. Indeed, 
only those who can appreciate the beauty of those rooms should 
be allowed to enter them, for an ignorant or unfeeling visitor 
would be an intrusion and an insult to good taste. When the 
Looker-On gave a knock the other day and was admitted by an 
electric button from within, his friend Redding was seated on 
tbe piano stool, in his favorite indoor costume, a heavy Japanese 
gown, a long blonde wig and a tiara of Sausalito rubies. As the 
caller entered, "Howdy do, Looker-On, old boy?" was his greet- 
ing. "I am just composing a sonata for a young lady friend. 
Give Arthur a nudge, will you?" 

Arthur McEwen was sleeping on a divan — a divan covered 
with a pale blue velvet cloth embroidered with four hundred and 
sixteen golden bees. But the Looker-On could not disturb him, 
by reason of being sight-dimmed by tbe glories of tbe room. 
Little gilt tables were placed here and there, and on each was a 
long-necked vase from which protruded a peacock feather. An 
odorous breath of the Orient hovered everywhere. Great heavy 
portieres, of a dull brown color, hung over the windows and the 
doors, the carpet was too inches thick, the chairs were all 
gilded and too fine to sit on. Oh, but it waB inspiring! 
Where was the robe that Cleopatra wore when she received An- 
thony ? Where were the starry sky and Apollo driving a chariot 
that made up the huge velarium that Nero had stretched across 
the Coliseum at Rome ? Where was the toga of Csesar ? On tbe 
walls of Joe Bedding's room. There, too, were weapons of many 
kinds, from the bludgeon of the South Sea islander to the shark's 
tooth of the northern savage; from the sword of Napoleon to the 
cast-iron rapier with which Signor Lucchesi would have slain 
Signor Minelti had they met on the field of honor. All these were 
in Joe Redding's room. And in the pale green light that burned 
from the end of many spears, the Looker-On gazed iu wonder at 
this proud product of San Francisco's civilization, the man who, 
yet in the bloom of youth, can do almost anything better than 
any other man. 

" Redding," said the Looker-On, glancing up from a bank of 
soft pillows into which he had flung himself, "My heart goes out 
to you." 

" How's that, Lookey ? " 

" You're the only young man I ever met here who reminds me 
of what I was at your age." 

*< My friend," he said, quietly, " what'll yon have to smoke ?" 

" Give me a clay pipe," yawned McEwen ; " you'll find one in 
my coat pocket." 

The Looker-On does not care to say any more. Redding has a 
right to choost his friends. 



Jan. 27, 1894. 



SAN FRAN [» «> NEWS II ]]| i; 



The young ladies of society, a* we were Informed by a morn 
log paper not long ago. have taken to whistling. Whether this 
new form of entertainment will hare any effect in crowding out 
the moslcal abilities of the dear gtrli.it is hard to say — at any 
rate, it will be far more agreeable in many instances. • Our " 
society girls who sing and play, bare always hud an idea that the 
second or third spasm of the *. .ire of VU JfMfteninffr was more 
entertaining to a parlor full of guests than some music -»( a 
lighter vein. But who is there who would not rather hear Miss 
Jennie McJones pucker her angel lips and whistle "Coming 
Through the Rye," than Mis? Josle UoBrowD sing an aria from 
Dil ir<Wfcuri>f The girls are going ahead— going ahead of the 
men. Every day we hear of something new that they have 
"taken op" something original and novel. Some day we expect 
to bear that they have "taken up" the study of those graces 
which make girls lovable. 

• » • 

The annual entertainment of the Press Club takes place at the 
Grand Opera House on next Wednesday afternoon, beginning at 
1 o'clock. All the theatrical companies in the city will combine 
to make the programme an attractive one, and Professor Jordan 
will tell bis famous story of the salmon. The Iowa Band will 
render one or two numbers. There is no reason why there should 
not be a large crowd, as every one who has attended a press Club 
benefit knows how attractive it is. 



THRIFTY MR. THURSTON. 



VANDALISM has a magnificent object lesson in a corner of the 
Hawaiian village at the Midwinter Fair, where the stately em- 
blems of the overturned monarchy in the Island kingdom are ex- 
hibited as a side-show. A larger exhibition of the peculiar taste 
of the revolutionists could not easily be conceived. A monarchy 
is temporarily replaced by a republic through a successful revo- 
lution. The question of government is still undecided, and the 
nation is divided upon the issue. Representatives of the domi- 
nant party quietly abstract the throne, the crown and all of the 
royal furniture upon which they can lay their hands, ship these 
articles to a foreign country, and show them to all the curious, at 
so much a peep. Is the Provisional Government guiltless in the 
matter? The bead and front of the revolutionary movement, the 
man who planned the campaign and directed the overthrow of 
the government, is Lorin A. Thurston. For his services he re- 
ceived the post of Hawaiian Minister to Washington. He is turn- 
ing an honest penny as a concessionaire at the Midwinter Fair, 
owning a half interest in the Hawaiian cyclorama and village. 
Through the medium of bis allies, members of the Provisional 
Government, Thurston, the Government official, gives to Thurs- 
ton, the showman, part of the property of this nation. The act 
receives small consideration from the fact that Thurston is him- 
self a native of the Hawaiian Islands, and might be presume.! to 
have a streak of patriotism mingled with his desire for gain. 
Naturally the rr yal curios were abstracted secretly. To have 
removed them openly would have aroused a storm of indignation, 
not only on the part of the Royalists, but also among many of 
the adherents of the present administration. When the news of 
this matter reaches Honolulu, a tempest may be expected which, 
may make that town resemble the fiery volcano of Kilauea which 
Thurston's cyclorama is designed to illustrate. 



OF the crowds who visit the great Yoaemite Cyclorama, at the 
corner of Market and Tenth streets, very few have any idea of 
the manner in which the mammoth canvas, fifty feet high and four 
hundred feet long, was painted. In the first place the canvas was sewed 
to gas pipe at the top and bottom, the pipe having been bent into a 
great circle, the lower pipe being hung with weights to stretch the 
canvas. Then a circular railway was laid all around close to the can- 
vas, and on this traveled a derrick as high as the canvas, with stages 
for holding the artists. At the head of this picked staff was C. D. 
Robinson, the well-known artist, who already had made elaborate 
sketches on the ground in the Yosemite. The tremendous granite 
bowlders in the foreground, separate from the canvas, were made by 
taking plaster casts of the giant rocks in the Yosemite, bringing the 
casts to San Francisco and using them for molds. Into these staff 
was run by expert men, and upon hardening it was taken out and 
painted by hand in perfect imitation of the granite color. So elabor- 
ate has been the work on the giant canvas that some of the details 
can be seen only with an opera glass. The storm effect on the left is 
wonderful, and the impression of the profound depth and distances 
from the observer's point of view is overwhelming. Of all t he fani- 
ous cycloramas this, by Mr. Robinson, will be declared by many ob- 
servers to be the most artistic, impressive and realistic. 

HUGH MAULDIN, whose reputation for being connected only 
with those jewelry institutions which enjoy public confidence, 
and whose good name guarantees that he will do all that h e prom- 
ises, announces that he is selling out the stock of W. Schulz ( formerly 
Schultz & Fisher, manufacturing silversmiths at 414 MarketVtreet), at 
low prices to private buyers. 



Mark Hopkins Institute of Art; open daily, 
evenings. 



Concert Thursday 



A GENTLEMAN'S SMOKE. 

TO THE MANUFACTURE OF THIS 
[ TOBACCO wc hove ^ivcn the most 

c.-ircfu! attention and the benefit 

of many years experience. 
' If is jhc choice^ Smoking 

Tobacco. 

MARBURG BROS., Baltimore, Md. 




'S 



COATS. 



Latest styles. Can be 
worn in place of an Over- 
coat, and will keep you 
perfectly dry. 

GOODYEAR RUBBER CO 



K H. PEASE, 

Vice-President and Manager. 

5? 7-579 Market st., S. F. 
73-75 First st., Portland, Or. 




P,&B 



FRUIT DRYING PAPERS, 
BUILDING PAPERS, 
| ROOFING AND PAINTS. 



PARAFFINE PAINT CO., 116 Battery St. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG & CO., 
The Model American Caterer. 

1206 SUTTER ST., S. F. Telephone 2388. 

Perrier-Jouet & Oo. 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 

For sale by all first-class Wine Merchants and Grocers. 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast, 

133 California Street. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 27, 1894. 




AVERY fanny story ig going the rounds of the avenue over- 
looking the bay, and as no names are given there may be 
no harm in reporting it. A certain young miss, whose people are 
on the edge of the Bonanza clique, attends a fashionable school, 
and one of the teachers, wishing to give the girls a subject for a 
thesis, called tbem up and saia that she had selected "The Origin 
of Species." What was the teacher's amazement the following 
day when little Miss laid her paper on her desk with the re- 
mark : " My Pa wants to know what you're giving us. If it's 
coin that's meant, why, he should say it was the Bonanza strike 
that was the origin of specie, and so I don't need to write any 
more about it." Amid a titter from the pupils, the teacher pro- 
ceeded to enlighten the young miss upon the fact that what she 
wished her to study was where she and her parents came from. 
But the result was more amazing still when, the next morning, 
she was informed that the girl's Ma sent her word that if she had 
no better use for her time than trying to spy oit folks's early 
history she'd better quit teaching school I 

* • * 

How embarrassing it must be for young ladies who go into so- 
ciety without either parent in attendance, and who receive soci- 
ety at home without their mother being in evidence, to have a 
visiting tourist ask if they are orphans, as happened at the mili- 
tary ball the other night! 

The army beaux are carrying all before them, it seems, to 
judge from the frequent encomiums passed upon them by our 
pretty belles. The only wonder is why some of these soldier boys 
do not capture some of our rich girls. 

They do say that Lieutenant Wilcox is in a fair way to do so, 
and there is also a rumor which credits one of the Presidio lads 
with having made a winning in the heiress line. Should this 
rumor prove true, what a pang it would bring to a little city 
man, unless it should prove to be the sister and not his special 
weakness that is alluded to! 

On dit, Miss Flood, Miss Low, Miss Friedlander, Miss Lauton 
and Miss Gwin are debating upon a club to be started during 
Lent. As the religious faiths of these ladies are mostly different, 
it is safe to assume that the object of the club will not be sectar- 
ian, but, following the example of the Church Club banquet, will 
be the discussions of the several beliefs. 

The club men are said to have taken up the idea of a ball, sug- 
gested by a pretty ,i bud" throagh the News Letter, and there 
is every probability of a grand Easter ball, to be given by the 
united clubs in the very early part of April. 

Should the Duke and Duchess of York (sweet Princess May) 
decide upon accepting the invitation just given them to visit 
Australia, it is fair to suppose that the royal party will "take 
in " San Francisco either coming or going, and if so, what a bril- 
liant opportunity for our Anglo-mania to assert itself! 

A very witty and humorous skit, in the form of a comedy, 
written by James D. Phelan, on the Hawaiian fiasco, and consist- 
ing of a take-off on the Queen and all those connected with the 
recent imbroglio, was to have been produced by the Fortnightly 
Club at the Goads' on Wednesday, but the members of the cast 
discovered that they had insufficient time in which to learn their 
roles, and hence the undertaking was abandoned. It is hoped, 
however, that this exceedingly clever production will find some 
way in the future to find the light. 

* # # 

The change of the Fortnightly Club meeting was owing, on dit, 
not only to Mrs. Lloyd Tevis's ill health, but to the larger facili- 
ties for stage effects to be obtained at the Goad residence. 

* • * 

The guests at the Foute tea were unanimous in their admir- 
ation of sweet Miss Mason, whose gentle waya and arch coun- 
tenance make a rare combination. 

* * * 

At Mrs. Pond's, pretty Miss JoUiffe and distingue Miss Ruger 
added much to the attraction of the occasion; and here, possibly, 
the largest gathering of the day's teas was to be found. 

* » * 

One of the prettiest girls of this season is decidedly Miss Flor- 
ence Hartsuff, whose father is the recently appointed Medical 
Director on General Ruger's staff. The youDg lady is not only 
attractive in looks, but is possessed of a highly cultured mind 
and most charming manner, which, in these days of abrupt in- 
difference, cannot be too highly appreciated. 



Our gilded youth and their large following are very much 
exercised over the idea of having regular fox-hunting. "It's so 
deucedly English, you know." Many have been the attempts 
on their part to enlighten the minds of their fair friends at cotil- 
lion and dinner dance as to how the thing is done. One evening 
of late something of the kind was going on at a fashionable "tea," 
when a lady, who is known in the swim as having a sharp 
tongue and somewhat acidulated disposition, remarked: "Oh, 
the girls are adepts in cnb bunting already, especially when the 
cub is a scion of a gilded family; but as to foxes, where are they 
to find them? — the old boy element is too scary to show." 

* * * 

All sorts of rumors are rife as to the aspirants for the favor of 
the Van Ness avenue heiresses. It remains to be seen who will 
pull out the plum from this remarkably rich pie. Jack Horner, 
who sits in his corner, will assuredly not, for a man must be up 
and doing to achieve success in any enterprise. 

* * * 

Evidently this opinion is shared by more than one, for activity 
prevails about the big corner mansion. Footpads don't seem able 
to keep the beaux away. 

» # * 

Actually the girls are envying their old friend Milly Ashe (Mrs. 
Sewell) the shipwreck she had the experience of. "Only think," 
said Emily, "of all she will have to talk about I" Whether walk- 
ing barefoot soaked to the skin after a buffet with the waves be 
a pleasant topic, is a question of taste merely. 

No news yet from the Be Tolna. Festetica has the helm, how- 
ever. 

The many friends of charming Miss Cecelia Miles, who was so 
popular during her stay in this city, are anticipating with much 
pleasure a visit which General, Mrs. and Miss Miles contemplate 
paying us during the Midwinter Fair to see it and them. 

The damp "weather necessitates the wearing of just such comforta- 
ble underwear as is sold by John W. Carmany, 25 Kearny street, 
this month. 




A. de LUZE & FILS' 

(BORDEAUX) 

IFIISnE CLARETS. 

St. Estephe, Pontet Canet, Chat. Margaux, 

Pauillac, Chat. Leoville, Chat. Beychevelle, 

Brown Cantensc, Chat. Larose, Chat. Montrose, 

St. Julen, Chat. Paveil, Chat. Lafite- 

FINE SAUTERNES. 



Sauternes Sup'r. 



Haut Sauternes* 

la Cases, Quarts and Pints. 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

Sole Agents. 314 Sacramento Street. 



Chateau Yquem. 



DON'T FAIL TO REE 

AT THE MIDWINTER FAIR 

THE EXHIBIT OF 

DOXSEE'S PURE CLAM JUICE, 

IS PACKED ONLY IN CANS, 

For that is the only way it can be thoroughly sterilized and preserved 
without the use of chemicals. 

It is subjected to so great a heat (no glass bottle could stand it without 
breaking), that absolute destruction of all germ life is assured, which, to- 
gether witti air-tight cans, alone can assure perfect preservation. 

Office of | 

J. L. Halsey, M. D.Islip.L. Li 
Living in close proximity to the Clam Canning Factory of J. H.Doxsee 
& Son, I have had numerous opportunities of visiting th* establishment 
and seeing the manner in which the clams and juice are prepared for the 
market. The steaming process employed destroys all germ life; and I can 
testify to the absolute purity of the juice-no adulterants beiog used. 

J. L. HALSEY, M. D. 
Testimonials from hundreds of other physicians on file. 
Grocers— 10c. and 30c. Can. 



Jan. 27. 1894. 



SAN FRAtfCHSOO NEWS LETTER 



11 



THE MORAL EFFECT OF CLOTHES. 



[Bt Pi V xehoh.1 



FA8HION8 vary In different 1. realities, and what is good form 
In one community would doubtless offend Ibe standard of 
another place, bat there can be no question as to the effect of 
neatness and cleanliness upon the estimation in which a person 
is held. 

Are good clothes conducive to pood morals? is an old question 
tbat is frequently asked, and by an authority on the subject has 
been answered in quite an ingenious way. "When women begin 
to dress, they begin to bathe, and tt generally follows that fine 
ontward appearance means cleanliness and tidiness in the gar- 
ments that are unseen." This is just as true as the opposite fact 
tbat loud, overpowering perfumes indicate lack of personal clean- 
liness. Neat clothes, a clean skin and a moral nature are apt to go 
hand in hand. By appealing to a girl's pride in her looks, by the 
addiog of some coveted article to her daughter's wardrobe, many 
a mother has succeeded in inducing an untidy girl to take more 
careful interest In ber personal appearance and manner. I have 
beard of mothers who, wishing to refine away the roughness of a 
boy's nature and cultivate bis better qualities, have dressed the 
child In girl's clothes and brought him np as a member of the 
weaker sex (some boys grow up to be "sissy men") without any 
such training. 

Any observing teacher will tell you that when the bad boy of 
the class comes to school in a new suit of clothes, he seems over- 
awed with a sense of something very superior, and tbat for a 
little white, at least, he really tries to live up to bis clothes. It is 
easier to teach clean children than dirty ones, and I don't wonder 
that the early missionary fathers of California baptized their con- 
verts by Immersion, believing tbat the waters of the font would 
be as good for their bodies as for their souls. Acting along pre- 
cisely the same line of reasoning, the Salvation Array to-day 
gives all those whom it receives in an asylum a cleansing bath 
before it attempts to reach their spiritual being. So with the 
81um Sisters, that missionary branch of the Salvation Army. 
They go about with bucket and brush, and mop and soap, and 
make clean both the inside and the outside of the cup and 
platter. 

The love for fine clothes and the desire to possess them has 
been the ruin of thousands. How many servant girls began in 
all inoocense to try on their mistress' clothes while she was out, 
just to see how they would look in them, and finished by steal- 
ing sufficient to send them to prison I The occasional pilfering of 
some perfumery from my lady's dressing table, of a few hand- 
kerchiefs from her well-stocked box, or a bit of lace, does not 
seem so much to the girl at the time, but when the reckoning 
comes, it is altogether a different matter. 

All of ns like pretty clothes, and would prefer to wear purple 
and fine linen and fare sumptuously every day. I doubt not 
tbat many, if they were permitted to choose, would take the 
good clothes instead of food, and almost starve themselves to 
keep up their style. It has been well said that a full stomach 
inspires confidence, but there is something about the conscious- 
ness of being well dressed that has not its equal in the world. It 
is not the man or the woman who is faultlessly attired for a 
"Bocial function" that is uncomfortable, betraying apprehension 
of a dreaded something that is destroying all pleasure. No; it is 
the girl who fears that some one will suspect tbat her bat is her 
old one done over, or that her dress has been dyed and made up 
with the addition of a cheap imitation of 
what every one knows is beyond her 
purse. It is not the man whose swallow- 
tail coat fits him like a dream that is 
anxious about his shirt bosom. But asfor 
the feelings of the poor devil who tempor- 
arily is spending the evening in a hired 
Buit, or who knows that his coat sleeves 
are too short for him, he is not to be 
grudged any subsequent good fortune that 
may overtake him. He has discounted it 
all in advance by what he suffers. 

A tight shoe will make a fiend out of 
the mildest of men; an ill-fitting glove 
would ruffle the serenity of a Madonna. 
The disposition of many a naturally amia- 
ble child has been well-nigh ruined because 
of some unhappy experience in regard to 
the clothes she has been compelled 10 wear 
to school. Children are little savages to 
each other; they delight to apply the tor- 
ture. Let a child appear in the play- 
ground wearing something very different 
from the rest, and the side remarks, the 
audible criticisms and unkind looks will 
drive a sensitive child nearly mad. I do 
not mean that this will always happen to 
a child who is poor. As a general thing, 



PI IIII lis 

— at » k I. : 

KIA1 Tim s no skiv 

No other ooamttlc »* 




1>R. T. MUX OOl HA I lis 

oi i. i.i.i « rmm, or Mnglral 
HrniiHflrr. 
i F- un. ) imp .-, Frcckli 
* v l'i tciicr Ka*h and Bklodlieati 
and every blemUb on beauty, and 
detection, n has itood itu- t<**.t <>f <o rears, 
and N mi ImrmlfM wc t«t.tc It to he Mire 
it i« proper) | made, Accept no oounter 
fell of Attnllnr mmr. Dr. U A. Havre Mild 
toaUdvof the hftut-tou < a patient): "A§ 
}"U ladies will ut.0 them I recommend 
r Qonraod*i Cream' as the letht harmful ..f 
all the hkin preparations." 

For Mis hi all <lMiRgifttsand fancy pond | 

dealer* lu the United mates, Canada* and 

Europe. 

IrHU t. HOPKINS, Proprietor, 

37 (.III \ r JONES STREET, 

New York. 




SLATE BURIAL VAULTS. 

Are recommended by every person who seeB them. They are proot 
against dampness, rodents and reptiles; are portable to ship to any part 
of the country. Are cheaper than brick and can be put laplace by ordinary 
workmen. SJnte In Im- 
perishable by nature, 
and has greater strength 
than anyother stone. Ap- 
ply to R. F. ROBERT 
SON, Pacific Coast Agent, 
Los Gatos, Cal. N. CLARK 
& SONS, 17 and 19 Speai 
St., San Francisco. 

Telephone 771. 

T^RANK KENNEDY, LAW-OFFICE, ROOM 6fi, MURPHY BUILDING, 
x (Third floor), 1236 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

children respect poverty, and do not say mean thinga to those 
who are wretchedly clad. 

It has seemed to me that a mother might do a wise act if she 
took notice of how the other children were dressed in the school 
which her child attended, so as not to let her child be set apart 
by any unnecessary peculiarity of dress. It used to be the 
fashion to dress twins or children nearly of an age in clothes 
exactly alike. This had its advantages on the score of economy; 
but it robbed the child of its own identity, and I have never 
known a case where children who were so dressed in their youth 
did not afterwards refer to it in terms of distaste. 

It is not always well to make fun of children for being fastid- 
ious about their clothes, or for trying to ape and to follow the 
fashions of their elders. Of course their attempts are often 
ridiculous; but such tendencies might be properly directed to the 
ultimate good of the child. Is there a practice much more repre- 
hensible than that which some parents in allowing one child to 
save up its money to add to what the parent intends to pay for 
an article of wear, for the purpose of being better dressed than its 
companions? Such a course promotes a foolish feeling of superi- 
ority, and an unwarranted claim for attention that cannot be but 
prejudicial to the best good of the child. 

To one who is weary with the cares and worries of the day, a 
change of clothing freshens the whole nature and makes the tired 
part of the day a thing of the past. "I never so thoroughly 
respect myself when I am in my old clothes," said a society 
woman, "and whether I expect to eat in company or entirely 
alone, I always pay myself the compliment of dressing for 
dinner." 



PURITY! PURITY!! 

That is the fundamental principle of our 
business and on it we stake our reputation 
when making the 

GAIL BORDEN 'EAGLE' BRAND 

Condensed Milk. In times of epidemics 
when all foods are called into question the 
public can rely with perfect confidence on 
the "Eagle" brand and serve it with 
the assurance that it is a food Free From 
All Disease Germs. Remember that ! 
It's the food for children. 

Your Grocer and Druggist sell it. 

Every can is sterilized and every microbe killed. 




12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 27, 1894. 




if Sl]arp The course of the business on Pine street during 

Decline the past week has not been very satisfactory to 
In Values, dealers on the long side of the market. Trading 
hai been very dull and prices have declined to an extent which 
has worked a serious injury to many investors. Speculation has 
been too rash altogether for some time past, and in the haste to 
get loaded up with stocks, people have in the majority of instances 
labored under a misapprehension of facts, in regard to the work 
recently inaugurated in Con. Cal. Virginia. They did not even 
wait for the starting of the drift from which so much was ex- 
pected, but jumped prices on themselves in a wild rush for stock. 
Impatience has characterized their actions ever since, and this 
has been a powerful factor in breaking the market back to its 
present level. The men in charge of the drift have been sharply 
criticized from the day the very first pick was struck, for not im- 
mediately developing an ore body, as though bonanza deposits 
were kept on tap subject to the whims of a set of over-anxious 
shareholders. It would require a man to possess an unusually 
placid temper, to put up with the annoyance to which James H. 
Rule has been subjected ever since he first commenced work on 
the lode. Many a one would have thrown up the contract long 
ago under a similar amount of provocation, and consigned the 
mine and everyone connected with it to the devil. Although he 
has less to gain by finding the ore than people well heeled with 
thestock would by an advance in prices, he bas much to lose, a 
fact which it seems is never taken into consideration by specu- 
lators, in their present excited and nervous condition. The dis- 
coverers of the big bonanza did not find it in a day, but they got 
there eventually in the long run, and probably got their share of 
abuse at the time for not being sharp enough in the work of devel- 
opment. Rule would require to be supernaturally clever to enable 
him to conform with the wild ideas of the people, in whose inter- 
ests he is undoubtedly doing his best. He asked for six months 
to carry out his plans, and as a matter of justice and in a spirit of 
fair play, unfriendly criticism should be deferred until the expira- 
tion of this period in case of failure. The future of the market 
depends largely on the success of this Rule drift, and despite the 
constant croaking of a set of pestiverous nobodies on the street, 
the News Lettek still bas every confidence in the man and his in- 
tentions. If the ore is there it will be opened up, and there are 
more chances in favor of a discovery than there are against it. 
There is nothing new from any other quarter of the lode, although 
some of the South End shares have been stronger on merit in the 
mines. 

$ $ $ 
The Amador The fact that a gentleman holding a position 
kjine of trust, or whatever it might be called, is a resi- 

Ernbroglio. dent in the vicinity of the Amador Gold Com- 
pany of London (known under an alias since reconstruction was 
carried into effect) suggests the inquiry as to who employs him, 
or if he is employed by the aforesaid company. If he is, it is 
something like having a man to watch a stable after the horse 
had been pilfered. The extraordinary twists and turns in the 
ownership of this property have been such as to render it almost 
impossible for a layman to decide the question without laying 
himself open to possibly a well sustained accusation of men- 
dacity. A lawyer of prominence in this city, well versed on the 
litigation over this mine, is our authority for the statement that 
the English company does not own an inch of the ground on or 
below the surface, nor the improvements thereon. This being 
the case, is it not rather absurd to go to the expense of providing 
a resident manager. Some of the London shareholders of this 
concern should attend to this matter, and cut off such an appar- 
ently useless outlay. Quite enough money has been squandered 
already one way or another in this quarter, without wasting any 
more. In building up a record as a gigantic failure, at least a 
quarter of a million of dollars must have "gone to the dogs." 

Local The plethora of money for investment by the 

Stock wealthier class of people in this city has made busi- 
Inuestments, nees more active recently for the brokers on the 
Stock and Bond Exchange. For the week ended on the 22d Inst, 
the total sales amounted to 1254 shares, at prices which ruled re- 
markably firm in all lines of securities. Toward the close of the 
week values have been inclined to sag a little, but the dealing in 
bonds was brisker than it has been for a long time. The recent 
sales include a lot of Market street cable shares, the first recorded 
in the Board. The price obtained was $31. Electric Light has 
not been largely dealt in of late, and Powder Stocks have also a 
light representation in the official list of sales. The sudden jump 
in Hawaiian Commercial stock from $5 to $50 within a few hours, 
has created considerable comment in financial circles, but the pub- 
lic only benefit in the appreciation of value to the extent of 115 
shares, the total amount of outside stock which was paid upon 
at the last assessment of $5 per share. 



if Sljot The greater portion of the financial press of 
That Told. Great Britain is up in arms against Editor Wilson, 
of the Investor's Review, of London, for his daring criticism of the 
management of the Bank of England. It is tantamount to sac- 
rilege to question the standing of the Grand Old Lady of Tbread- 
needle street, and the shockingly broad statement of the icono- 
clastic Wilson are roundly condemned on all sides by the old fogy 
Tories, who are as conservative as ever to the backbone for all 
their liberal prate in the publications they control. Sensible peo- 
ple, viewing the matter from an unprejudiced standpoint, will, 
however, agree with Mr. Wilson, who is probably rather sur- 
prised at the commotion his remarks have created. One of his 
critics went the length of accusing him of high treason, urging 
the point that he who attacks the standing of the "bank saps the 
very foundation of the British throne." The warning, however, 
had a timely effect, and it is likely that henceforth the business 
of the bank will be conducted with a little more prudence in the 
future, thanks to the gentleman who had the temerity to haul 
the directors over the coals. Of course there is no questioning 
the high financial standing of this great institution, but small 
leaks have sunk many a big ship, and it cannot be denied that 
some of the actions of the present directors within the past few 
years have not been beyond criticism. It is just as well for the 
financial press to see to it that the sapping process does not begin 
at the foundation of their national business prosperity, and leave 
the throne to take care of itself in the interim. 

$ $ $ 

Aq tasy If the truth were told, there is more money on 
Money hand just now in bank and among private individ- 
Market. uals than can be used to advantage. Business has 
contracted to such ao extent in commercial circles that there is 
little or no demand for money, and real estate is about as dull as 
any other branch of trade. The savings banks are loaded down 
with deposits, the cash surplus running up high in the millions, 
and money in private hands is locked up, idle and not earning a 
cent. As a rule, people prefer to deal with a bank when forced 
to seek financial accommodation. They get fairer treatment and 
are put to less expense than is incurred in satisfying the whims 
of some wheezy old attorney for one of the local Shylocks, who 
run their affairs as closely as possible to the pawnbroking sys- 
tem without incurring the notoriety of sailing under true colors, 
at the sign of the <• Three Balls." Most of the banks are again 
accommodating customers, and it is likely that before long no 
good loan will be refused. While some of the banks are charging 
8 per cent., an advanced rate, it is noticeable that heavy concerns 
like the Hibernia still continue to lend at the old rate— 7 per cent. 
From present appearances lenders will be glad to shave even the 
latter rate before very long, if they wish to do business. There 
is too much money lying idle now, and there will be more instead 
of less during the next six months. 



A Successor Governor Markham has appointed J. B. Fuller 

for of Marysville to succeed A. Geberding as Bank 

Geberdiqg. Commissioner, who retires on February 1st. Mr. 

Fuller is a banker of long experience, and his appointment is 

very generally approved by bankers all over the State. 

$ $ $ 

An Insurance Owing to the depreciation of its securities, 
Company the Manufacturers' and Builders' Insurance 
Withdraws. Company of New York shows a light impair- 
ment, and at a meeting held last week, it was decided to with- 
draw from active business. Notice to tbis effect has been given 
to different agents all over the country, and to the New York 
State Insurance Department. The Manufacturers' and Builders' 
is owned and managed by the Palatine of Manchester. It was 
organized in 1870, but a year or so ago it passed into the hands 
of the Palatine. 



$ $ $ 



Tine Oceanic 
Steamsljip 
Gomqaqy. 



At the annual meeting of the Oceanic Steamship 
Company, held during the week, twenty-one 
thousand shares of stock were represented, and 
the following officers were elected to serve for the ensuing year. 
John D. Spreckels, President; Captain Charles Goodall, vice- 
President, E. H.Sheldon, Secretary; J. D. Spreckels Brothers', 
Treasurer; Claus Spreckels, A. B. Spreckels, A. L. Tubbs, A. C. 
Tubbs and Charles S. Wheeler, Directors. 

$ $ $ 

AT the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Savings and 
Loan Society, held on the 23d, at which 9700 shares out of 
10,000 were represented, the following were elected directors for 
the year: Horace Davis, Isaac Hyde, Arthur A. Smith, S. C. 
Bigelow, George E. Goodman, A. N. Brown, F. H. Woods, E. W. 
Burr and Willis E. Davis. At the meeting of the newly-elected 
board S. C. Bigelow was elected President, Arthur A. Smith, Vice 
President; Cyrus W. Carmany, Cashier; E. Bonnell, Assistant 
Cashier; J. F. McGauley, Auditor, and Horace Davis, Arthur A. 
Smith and Isaac Hyde, Finance Committee. 



Jan. 27, 1884. 



s\\ FRANCISCO NEWS I.l.rn I: 



18 




" How (he Crier \\ bat the devil art it: 

"One Ihtt wlU pUt the devil, »(r. wilh fOO." 

A FAIR correspondent (who t vidently desires lo acquire sultl- 
cifnt moral courage to bring an action for divorce from a 
scoundrel whom even the footpad scare cannot make behave him- 
self) writes a long letter to the Town Cbxbb, asking for his 
•« views " on divorce, and begging him not lo be " sarcastic or 
flippant." She particularly wants the T. C.'s opinion of the mean- 
ing of the words: " Whom God hath joined together, let uo man 
pot asunder." If they mean anything, dearie, it is this: Those 
whom God bath joined together are those in whom He hath planted 
a desire, and to whom He hath granted the opportunity, to live 
together for the purpose of perpetuating the species. If they de- 
sire their joining together to be accompanied wilh a speech from 
a parson or a justice of the peace, or with jumping over a broom- 
stick, there is no intrinsic barm in that. If it should happen, 
after God batb joined them together, that He should choose to 
disjoin tbem by making them distasteful to each other, He batb, 
by that His act, put them asunder; and no act of any man, 
whether by withholding or by granting a divorce, has altered or 
can alter that divine state of things. Death or violent physical 
restraint is the only way for man to put asunder those whom God 
bath joined toge'.her — a decree of divorce is entirely extraneous, 
irrelevant and immaterial to the issue that God hath made. The 
parson who, with understanding, declares that marriage is a 
divine institution, and that no man should put asunder those 
whom God hath joined together, is right. But the parson who 
declares that those whom God already hath disjoined shall not 
resort to convenient forms, instituted by the social compact, for 
carrying out His holy will, is wrong ; and the parson who declares 
that the speech made by him at the marriage is God's joining to- 
gether of a man and a woman, says, in effect, that he has done 
the joining, and that therefore he is God; and that is blasphemy, 
which, saith the Bible, is punishable with hell-fire. There is 
neither sarcasm nor flippancy in that. 

DETECTIVE Thacker, while holding bis sides to keep from 
bursting with laughter over the story that Evana and Morrell 
had escaped to Honduras, said last Monday: " At the present 
time they are within thirty miles of Visalia and forty miles of 
Fresno." If, wilh this important information, Mr. Thacker had 
possessed even the most rudimentary knowledge of Euclid, he 
might have been able to locate, within the tenth part of an inch, 
the spot upon which the bandits were standing, and might there 
have apprehended them. Thus: Describe an arc with Fresno as 
a center and with a radius of forty miles, and another arc with 
Visalia as a center and with a radius of thirty miles, and it is 
clear (the known distance between Fresno and Visalia being forty 
miles) that the point of intersection of the two arcs would be the 
spot upon which the outlaws were standing. << But alas! " Mr. 
Thacker may exclaim, " I didn't have a string long enough 1 " 
Perhaps so, else he might have used it to good purpose on his 
tongue. 

THE Town Ckxer, having been shown the following paragraph 
in a religions paper published here, and called the Occident, prints 
it, believing that it is a thousand times as amusing as anything 
he could write, and delighted to introduce a fellow humorist to 
the world: "California is a favorite landing-place for stranded 
prodigals, threadbare religionists and ecclesiastical tramps. With 
the Star of Empire, westward the procession steadily wends its 
way, until the broad Pacific stops its wending. The flotsam and 
jetsam of the Parliament of Religions is still drifting on the tides, 
and we Californians have a weaknes for scenting from afar some- 
thing Btrange and new and treating it kindly on its near ap- 
proach." 

THE Portia Law Club will fill a long-felt want. The mortar- 
board of the college girl is a useful thing in its way, but not 
until the officers of the new club shall have donned their 
Bcarlet gowns and caps will the superior intellectuality of lovely 
woman be duly emphasized. The cabalistic letters of the club, 
"P. C," emblazoned on stunning badges, do not mean, as one 
might be apt to infer, Pretty Cute, but Bimply Pro Consilio. 

THE Rev. Mr. Ferguson sees nothing in evolution that conflicts 
with religion, but the Rev. Mr. Anderson Btill swears by 
Moses. In the meanwhile it is to be noted that the clergymen 
who enjoyed their wine and cigars at the banquet of the Church 
Club have given the press no expression of their views as to the 
influence of tobacco smoke upon the evolution of the small boy. 

IT is to be feared that the vagaries of the Californian weather, 
which perversely refuses to follow the daily instructions of B. 
S. Pague, L. F. 0., will ultimately drive that worthy official to 
the extremity in which Weather Prophet Jenkins so unfortun- 
ately but quite naturally found himself. The extremity referred 
to was drink. 



THK hole win. h d, tbr street contractor, has made In 

1 reel Superintendent Ackerson's reputation Is nni only 
Dlog bol multiply inn as well; and through tbeu * dines a 
light mi radiance. Perhaps, with the thrift vrblofa 

distinguishes ins kind, .Mr. Ackeraon reasons that wealth loqolrcd 
at the sacrifice of a ),*<>...! name (and perhaps a temporary loss of 
liberty) is Bafflclei di atlOD. Meanwhile, the discomforts 

attending Investigation, discovery and exposure of Ihla gentle- 
man'* conduct should be borne by him with the patience of the 
gentleman who Bnds that .von the work of drilling into a safe 
with burglarious Intent Is likely to be criticised severely. In all 
theae minor enterprises, discretion le Indispensable to a success- 
ful issue— It Is only an Alexander the Great who can sack an 
empire, die gloriously and live In history with a nimbus. If Na- 
poleon Bonaparte were alive and holding the oillce of Superin- 
tendent of Streets in San Francisco, it is not likely that be would 
permit a fence to be erected around the Union Trust Company's 
building, at the corner of Market and Montgomery streets.ao as 
to cover three-fourths of the sidewalk, when the law allows but 
half the walk to be so taken; he would not be ignorant of the 
warrant by w y hich the person who solicits advertisements to 
cover the fence gives a pledge that the fence will remain in situ 
nine months, and who informs his advertisers that Street Super- 
intendent Bonaparte and bis brother-in-law are two of the four 
partners who own the privilege, and that for this reason the space 
can be guaranteed. Napoleon would not do or permit a thing so 
small and mean as these; he would put the whole city in his 
pocket, and utilize Ackersons to scrub the corridors of the 
County Jail. 

UNDOUBTEDLY the worst exaggerates and moat sensational 
people in a community are the doctors. Recently thrown 
into violent eruption by the " anti-cigarette crusade," tbey have 
been clowning in the papers about the deadly cigarette, using the 
manifest evils which arise from extreme abuse of the cigarette 
habit, to cover all cases of its indulgence. So long as the more 
aggressive races of the world indulge in nerve stimulants and 
work out the will of God, so long will tobacco and alcohol be 
used ; and so long as persons of a high mental development and 
artistic tastes and occupations — the fine bohemians, in fact — 
prefer the clean, dainty, quickly used cigarette to the stinking 
pipe or the mouth-smearing cigar, just so long will doctors appear 
ridiculous in the eyes of those who constitute an important factor 
in the work of exposing of sham, cant and ignorance. 

ALREADY the soda fountains at the Midwinter Fair are being 
well patronized, and it is amusing to watch the enamored 
swain who escorts his beloved to the altar of Boda. Women are 
such dear, undecided creatures that they are sure, when asked, 
" What syrup are you going to have ? " to answer, " What are 
you going to take, George ? " George, if be knows his business, 
answers, " I'll take tomato syrup, dear." "Oh, then, I'll take 
the same," says the fair but undecided one. The heavenly maid 
who works the soda pump and divides her time among the dis- 
pensing of syrups, trying to keep her beauty spot on and flirting 
with males, mixes the tomato syrup. The undecided creature 
swallows the nectar and wanders off with her bucolic friend, won- 
dering why she feels so good, and inwardly resolving that in the 
future " tomato syrup " will be her fancy drink. 

HM. LEONARD, who looted the Bank of Santa Clara, should 
„ not be condemned without reflection. For, being a Christian 
gentleman with a brave record in the church of which he was a 
pillar, he has accomplished two most commendable things — by 
humbling the pride and stripping the pockets of those whom he 
robbed, he has better fitted them for heaven, and at the same 
time has made it impossible for his own aoul to mar, by its pres- 
ence, the pleasure of their souls in Paradise. 

THE Society for the Suppression of Vice has adopted a new 
policy. It will no longer exert its energies for the suppression 
of female virtue, but, in the words of Director Moore, "will here- 
after devote its principal attention to the suppression of vicious 
literature." The society's intention, it is to be presumed, is to 
buy up and destroy all copies of newspapers that contained 
reports of the legal proceedings in which their late and lamented 
Secretary, Bennett, so nastily figured. 

THINGS are seldom what they seem — 
A love lies all forlorn; 
And the daintiest patent-leather shoe 
Oft hides an awful corn. 

A CORRESPONDENT, who is evidently a lady, and a tender- 
hearted school-marm at that, has written to the Town Ceier 
on the training of children. Her style is florid and gushing, aDd 
she says: " Mothers should try to find the soft, tender, genial 
side of their child's nature." Such advice as that is unnecessary 
here, my dear, as every mother generally does it with the sole of 
an old shoe, a shingle, or something of that kind. 

WE are pleased to note the fact that a scientist ha« just dis- 
covered that a man's diseases are all due to the clothes he 
wears. Perhaps this also accounts for the long lives of ballet girls. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LBTTER. 



Jan. 27, 1894. 




THE chaotic conditions which have prevailed in the internal 
political affairs of Servia for some time seem to have come to a 
head, but the attainment of the climax cannot be said to give any 
indication of a clarifying of tbe perplexing situation. For the 
present the Servian complications do not contain any element of 
international danger; they are altogether local in their nature, 
but then the domestic affairs of that country infringe so fre- 
quently upon the concernments of Russia and Austria, and, 
through those two powers, upon the general diplomatic situation 
in Europe, that their disturbance is a matter of grave import if 
not an absolute menace to the peace of Europe. For the present 
the controversy is between the young King and a strong political 
element known as the Radicals, and it chiefly centres npon the 
alternative of continuing or dropping the impeachment proceed- 
ings which were begun on the 21st of December last against the 
ex-members of the Liberal cabinet of M. Avakuniovitch. These 
impeachment proceedings rest upon three principal charges. 
First, they accuse the ex-ministers of a number of speciflc viola- 
tions of the Constitution; second, they accuse them of having 
amplified a treaty with Austria without the authority of the 
Skupshtina, or Parliament; third, they accuse them of having 
caused the massacre at Gopatchitza. Of these specifications, one 

that referring to the commercial treaty with Austria — is absurd 

upon its face, and the character of the whole proceedings indicate 
that they were not brought with a desire to promote the cause of 
good government, but are, rather, the result of an unscrupulous 
desire on the part of those in power to crush political opponents 
before a prejudiced and packed court, as nine oat of the sixteen 
judges before whom the case was being heard were pronounced 
Radicals in their political sympathies. The young King seems, 
therefore, to have acted wisely and patriotically in intervening on 
behalf of tbe accused men. 

But behind this political dispute between factions and|parties 
stands a much graver source of trouble — the irrepressible finan- 
cial condition of the kingdom. The financial condition of Servia 
was never so unsatisfactory as at present. A Russian peri- 
odical points out that whereas the Servian principality had no 
national debt in 1868, the kingdom owed something like $60,000,- 
000 in 1889, and that debt had expanded to $82,000,000 at the be- 
ginning of 1893. The Pester Lloyd is authority for the statement 
that during 1890-91-92 the public debt of Servia was increased by 
a round $25,000,000, or at a rate which, if King Alexander were 
to reign as long as his father, would add $171,000,000 to the 
national obligations at the end of his term. The material re- 
sources of Servia are not equal to a drain of that kind. 

The governmental authority in Italy seems to have acquired 
control over the rioters, but still the position of the Crispi min- 
istry is anything but a bed of roses. Physical force can easily 
overcome riotous demonstrations, but, though the demonstra- 
tions be suppressed, the cause which produced them may con- 
tinue to exist. That is true in this particular case. The entire 
basis of organized society in Italy is demoralized. Taxation is 
too heavy, and there is no apparent way of reducing it except by 
curtailing military expenses, and the ministry which would do 
that would invite assault from abroad and insult at home. The 
Italian people, though they may grumble and riot over paying 
the bill for their abnormally large military establishment, do not 
want its efficiency Impaired, and would as promptly riot and 
grumble against any ministry that would propose to cut down 
the bill by cutting down the cause of it. They are like the boy 
who wanted to eat his cake and have his cake. The condition 
of the country, however, is such, that stormy times must be 
looked for in the future domestic controversies of Italy ; and that 
prospect is not rendered any more reassuring by the announce- 
ment that the Pope is about to allow the faithful to participate 
in political elections, a thing they have not been permitted to do 
since Victor Emanuel's troops entered Rome. It may be taken 
for granted that this body of somewhat prejudiced voters are not 
turned loose into the electorate at this juncture for the purpose 
of rendering the task of Italian statesmen any easier, or with a 
view to strengthen the political institutions of the country and 
adding stability to the excommunicated dynasty. 

The debate in the British House of Commons over the alleged 
insufficiency of the navy of that country disclosed the fact that 
the real question involved was one of politics — and very small, 
tricky politics at that — rather than an intelligent and patriotic 
fear that tbe armed marine resources of the government had fallen 
into a condition of perilous insufficiency. Mr. Balfour, the leader 
of the Tories, said: " None of the questions we have addressed 
to the Government, none of the anxiety we feel, relates to the 
present moment. Our fears relate to the future." In other 
words, they were quite satisfied that the present navy is all right, 
but they were not satisfied that their political opponents, the 



present ministry, would properly discharge the duties of their 
trustful station and keep it all right In short, they wanted to 
smuggle through the House a want of confidence motion in the 
guise of something else. On the vote, the surreptitious effort to 
smirch the patriotism and intelligence of tbe ministry was beaten 
by 240 to 204, and in the logic of the discussion, and the facts 
upon which it was predicated, the ratio of advantage was even 
more pronouncedly with Mr. Gladstone and his associates. 

The Greek Government is practically a bankrupt; it proposes 
to commit an act of insolvency by withholding from foreign own- 
ers of its bonded obligations something like seventy per cent of 
the interest which the securities are supposed to carry. Nearly 
all of these bonds were issued as a sort of mortgage over certain 
specific sources of revenue, and the diversion of these revenues 
from the purpose to which they are pledged {the payment of in- 
terest) is an act of scandalous bad faith. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 



: SHIPPING and COMMISSION MERCHANTS 



AND 



. GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS. 

* * 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco- 

National Assurance Company ... - }f Ireland 

Atlas Assurance Company ------ of London 

Boylston Insurance Company ------ of Boston 

Ocean Marine Insurance ------ of London 

NOTICE OF ^E2^£O n s7\A_I J . 
DR. J. H. STALLARD 

Has removed his office to 514 Sutter St. Hours, 12 to 2 daily, except 
Thursdays aad Sundays. Telephone 5209. 

DR, JOHN GALLWEY 
EC.A-S REMOVED 
to his new offices, 624 KEARNY Street, near Clay. 
Hours— 1 :30 to 4 p . M. and 7 :30 to 9 p . M. 
Telephone 207.] 1 Residence, 1331 Leavenworth . 

HP. THOMAS L. HILL, DENTIST, 

OFFICE-OJ&D FELLOWS' BUILD1NO, 8. W. Corner Seventh and 

Market Streets. 
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Consultation Hours: 4 to 5. 



D 



R. R. CUTLAR, DENTIST, 



Removed from Phelan Building, to 
NO. 416 GEARY STREET ----- SAN FRANCISCO 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 
806 Market Street (Phelan Bulletins.) 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for pois- 
tlvely extracting teeth without pain. "Colton Gas" has an established and 
nnrlvaled world-wide reputation for its purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
In all eases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established 1863. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also performs 
all operations in dentistry. 

DR. CHARLES W. DECKER 



D 



R. MACKENZIE'S 

English ELECTRIC BELTS. 

The only Electric Belt with Special nerve Electrodes. Agency at 

JOY'S BALDWIN PHARMACY, 

Powell and Market Sta., S. F. 



CANCER. 
THE KOEHLER CANCER CURE CO., 1428 Makket St., S. F. 
Cancer, Tumors or malignant growths removed without knife or caus 
tic. A GUARANTEED CURE a specialty. Call or send for circular. Over 
300 cancers preserved in alcohol in our office. Consultation free. 

PHILIP KOEHLER, Manager. 



DR. RICORD'S 



RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the 
Genuine— A Speciflc for Exhausted Vital- 
ity, Physical Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medi- 
cine, Paris, and the Medical celebrities. Agents for California and the 
Pacific States, J G. STEELE A C(»„ 635 MARKET STREET (Palace 
Hotel), San Francisco. Sent by mail or express anywhere, 

PRICES REDUCED. Box of 50 pills, $1.25; of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills, 
$S 50; of 400 pills, $6; Preparatory Pills. $2. Send for Circular. 



Iff I J tor\ t/a cr/^/ ^j 

135 Montgomery St., near Bush, San Francisco, Cal. 



Jan. 27. 1894. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



LB 



<fi^..R&wigp 



TBI •pprotcb of * sound money market, the strong desire of 
builders to Improve Idle property tnd (tilt-edge securities, 
hive made the banlt managers feel assured that making loans 
would hare • stimulating effect on the real estate market. The 
loans have been limited, it is true, but those that have been made 
hare had a marked effect on the realty center of this city. A 
reader of the real estate records will see the evidence of these loans. 
The building and loan associations, which are auxiliary to the 
banks, in the matter of making loans, have also resumed lending 
on pretty mncb the same terms as before the Gnancial stringency 
took bold of affairs. We are glad to be able to record the above 
facts, inasmuch as tbey will show the pnblic that there is at 
least one business that is bound to go ahead. While the premium 
on loans is a trifle higher than it was a year or so ago, owing, 
perhaps, to the great demand for money, men who want ready 
coin do not hesitate to pay it. 8even, eight or ten per cent is 
not too much for money when a man must have it, and it is a 
big reduction on the price of two or three months ago, when 
twelve per cent was considered a small price for a short-term 
loan. 

All this makes the architects and contractors the most alert 
people in town. Men in both these walks of life will be on the 
qui wive to catch not only the first, but as many, buildings as 
possible. 

It was not so very long ago that the News Letter showed the ad- 
visability of having a cross-town cable road from the Presidio and 
Harbor View, along Devisadero street to any point south of 
Market, and the information was also advanced by this paper 
that the property owners in that part of the city were preparing 
a petition to the Board of Supervisors, asking that body to force 
the men who held Devisadero street in franchise, to hurry the 
work or else surrender the franchise. Now the News Letter 
desires to say, with that modesty which always becomes it, that 
there will be no need of presenting this petition to the Super- 
visors, as the Devisadero-street franchise holders have promised 
to build a road as soon as they can see their way clear. We get 
this information from a wealthy Western Addition property 
owner, a gentleman who desires to have his name withheld. 
And now the residents of the far Western Addition can rejoice In 
the fact that they will not be subjected to a tiresome trip around 
town when they want to reach the southwestern part of the city. 
We are glad to see that the hint that we threw out has been 
taken np. 

Leon Sloss, of the Grand Jury, has prepared an extensive list for 
Street Superintendent Ackerson, calling that official's attention to 
a number of ruts, broken rails, loose cobbles, etc., along theroutes 
of the various car lines, and asking that they be repaired at once. 
This was a worthy piece of work on the part of Mr. Sloss. It 
deserves the praise of every public-spirited citizen, and, no 
doubt, will have some weight in making Mr. Ackerson perform 
his duty. But there was one thing that missed the eagle eye of 
Mr. 8loss, and that was the grip-slot of the Powell street, Ferries 
and Cliff House cable-road, which in places is wider than the law 
allows, making it dangerous for light vehicles whose drivers are 
compelled to travel with the track. If Mr. Sloss had ever driven 
out by Presidio Heights, along narrow Central avenue, and been 
forced to cross the track to escape collision with a passing car 
or vehicle, and felt the hind wheel of his buggy slip down the 
grip-slot of the cable roadway, he would only have suffered th« 
same misfortune that dozens of others suffered before him. Four 
times in succession we have called Mr. Ackerson's attention to 
this menace, and it has done but little good. 

The ballroom addition to the residence of M. H. de Young is 
completed. A. Page Brown designed the annex. The form is 
that of a temple, and the exterior decoration is classical. It cost 
about $10,000. 

The market is fairly brisk. Many sales are on the eve of con- 
summation, and until they are closed there will be no perceptible 
increase in the number of deeds filed. Some few calls for Pre- 
sidio Heights property show that buyers are looking for residence 
lots in that part of the city. 



Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, Mills Build- 
ing. 218-220 Montgomery street. Special attention given to the col- 
ecfion of rents. Full charge taken of property for absent owners. 



Mothers be sure and use 
children while teething. 



'Mrs. Winslows' Soothing Syrup" for your 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San Francisco, December 30, 1893. 
At a regular meeting of the board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of four and one-quarter (4^) 
>er cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending Dec. 31, 1893, 
ree from all taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1894 

R. J. TOB1N, Secretary. 
Office— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Street. 



Unlike the Dutch Process 

No Alknlios 
^V Otlicr~Cliemlcalg 




ar* ii«f<l in the 
preparation of 



W. KAKER & CO.'S 

SBreakfastCocoa 



ir/i ich i* nbtolu trlu 
pure and noluble. 
It hunmorethnn three time* 
[Ma rtrenf/th of Cocoa mixed 
■ with Starcb, Arrowroot or 
_ 'Sugar, and la far more eco- 
nomical, coating less than one cent a cup. 
It is delicious, nourishing, and easily 

DIGESTED. 

Sold bjr Grorcm rrcrywher*. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Hats. 



I 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Alpha Consolidated Mill and Mining Company. 

Location of principal plare of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby Riven that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Eighteenth day of January, 1894, an assessment, No. 12, of 
Ten (10) CentB per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately, in United States Gold coin, to the 
Secretary, at the office of the company, Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Wednesday, the Twenty-first Day ol February, 1894, will be delinquent. 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 20th day of March, 1894, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHARLES E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Confidence Silver Mining Company 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works-Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. _ 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 28th day of December, 1893, an assessment (No. 24) of twenty-five cts. 
per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payablo 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, 414 California street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock, upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the Thirtieth Day of January, 1894. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for tale at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore will be sold on TUESDAY, tbe 20ih day of February, 1894, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses of 
sale. By order of the Board of Directors. A. S. GROTH, Secretary. 

Office — 414 California street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Kentuck Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment :?*°' ? 

Amount per Share ■•■ 1° cents 

Levied Dec ■ m < 1893 

Delinquent in Office Jan. ?4. lfS4 

Day of Bale of Delinquent Stock Feb. 15, 1894 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. , 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment S°'J!5 

Amount per Share • ■•• 1 "°^5 

T, ev ied January 15, 1894 

Delinquent in Office February 19. ]lli 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock ...... „, M „ arcn I 4 ' 189 » 

* A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 

Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 

Cali fornia. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No „i 10 , 

Amount per Share • 2 L c 1?j! 

Levied January 17 1894 

Delinquent in Office Fe *J uary ?S' }lli 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock ... March 12, 1894 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, No. 3C9 Montgomery Street, San Francis- 
co, California. . , 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending December 31.1893, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of five (5) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and 
four and one-sixth (4 1-6) per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free 
of taxes, payable ou and after TUESDAY, January 2, 1891. 

■ v*'*" VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 
Office— Cor. Powell and Eddy streets, 3. F„ Cal. _____ 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

For the six months ending Dec. 31. 1893, a dividend has been declared 

at tbe rate of five (5) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four ana 

one-sixth (4 1-6) per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, payable on and 

after Tuesday, January 2. 1893. cYRng „_ CAKMANYi Cashler . 

Office— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 



16 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS I?ETTER,. 




Jan. 27, 1894. 



B_A_2sr:K:s. 



SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS 



Barley is slack; Brewing, 82' "c mi ! > % Peed 70? Uȣ P6r 0e , nta '- 
Oats, Milling, H.123*1.20;Fee£ ?lS>& id P Per "^'i®' 00 ' per <*>• 
Corn, White, 96c.; Yellow, SOceVoc. per ctl ° 
Kyeis quiet, fair demand, $1.02. Cement $2 00as2 ■>=, 

felffl^o!JflSc^rl,i£' -. @75 e.perctl. 
Cheese, light stock. 10c.@13c Eggs hi S m.aai. 

Provisions mov^'off Seadfy?' Bag? aVVrVhl buye^a?^ ?C -® 12C ' 

SMffiM ge®slo C =k f0r N 4'„n C d a r, d ^F S "t*"^^ •» '•-»'• 

Quicksilver is nominal at »30 per disk ^ "^ H ° PS ' ^®^. 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws and Refined. White. 4?*c filOc 

r,,H^ b ! 8i r SS ° tlookfor th « year before us is exceedingly pro- 

pitious, early and copious rains throughout the State enahftno. 

agriculturists to plant and sow a large acreage for gra.n in hf 

vaUeys, coupled with good fruit and other crops in thetseason 

The steamship Australia, hence on the 9n,h ;„ J season. 

Honolulu $25,000 Gold Coin shipped by th e Bank n 'rZT* ' 

and ,50,900 same shipped by Sp^eckehB o .Co H r cago'con' 

isted m part of 110 bbls. Flour, 30,610 lbs. Rolled Badey 6IO4" 

lbs. Cracked Corn, 1508 lbs. Dried Fruit, 5180 lbs Lard m ..?. 

eTc^ue%Y 6 % 8Ug "' 10 '° 00 lbS - 8al ^.- S«»5£ 

aboa°rd NeW Y ° rk - Shi P E " D ' «<» has 1000 flsks. Quicksilver 

Exports to Honolulu, per bark Albert, valued at $23 000 mr, 
sisted 10 part of 250 bbls. Flour, 1067 bales Hav 60 Vi ih. » u i 
Barley, 1650 cs. Kerosene Oil, 2400 sk T fra^', etc Brig j°' D 
Spreckels hence for Kahului on the 20th inst had 1% b'hN 
Flour and Mdse, valued at $2782 bls - 

Sales of Oranges at public auction are now of semi-week I v n- 

$ 10 n a C n„ *? D ,n M0D< l ay ' aSt f0ar oarloads ao ld: Fancy Navel " 
ml . „* ^° per box; idlings, $1 and $1 20. ' 

priTe h e e ver h kno d wnh e ere a *" ""^ l ° ?1 P <* CentaI ' th ° -est 
Suga a r h a U nd-3 T 03l S fuXf "" ""^ th8nM ' ™ th 6533 "^ 

h.r. «m i ,f- S - Tortoi5e ; t'ow Mazatlan, 58 sks. Silver Ore ,90 

pkgs. Treasure; from Central America <m 7 k.L n « . 
Mexican ports, 2193 bag, Ort^cs.tfme^l $5^ 

had h for P caygo a 4'n C 4 ina ' ?" t 8 - 78 tr0m Hon gkot>g via Yokohama, 

^SoKSf ^Sug^1^sX^,1o^ 
Mds T also fn V. , ^ aMlDg ' 200 balea Gunnies, 9000 pkSs 

Mdse " g8 ' Se ' ; f ° r H ° DOlUlU and elsewhefe, 300 pkfs 

Woof,^^ Per a 8 - M ° D0Wai ' thence ' 1187 in SOts Tin, 200 bales 

bc^rn'a-na^^r^r'sJnd^s 8 " 6006 ' 56 " "- 
NAs'r Keweenaw 18 days from Panama and way ports to 

^Sv? ?^^- -^--- -nee on 

b JJh'ow."^^ ^941°, *»">°??« freight for Decem- 
that of the year prevous Th ^ Wh '? h iS " ' arKe increase ° n 

tons, and for 189' 364 ui I graDd '° tal ,0r 1893 was 437 ' 31 3 
Thi. in ti, . , ' tons - In orease n 1893, 73 171 tons 

Jradeof h! ^ ° f a 8har P "PPOsition by sea in the carrying 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Northeast Corner California and Sansome Stra-i. 

BB.HCH CS!!.^ ^ B »^^ IT * '° 

Oeposlts.jnne 30, 1893 ket Street ' c "™er Polk. 

Guarantee Cupltul and Surplus »28,068,691 OO 

__' - 1,009,434 00 

George C. Boardma'u, J. G. Eastland; LoveUWhUe P»^hi»; B ' De Fre m ery 

m&V^t^e^o^Tel^'iaS RS* C °f Un '- »" 

B&K^oul^wiM^^ 

of the depositor should accompany the^^t^^™.™ 011 ^- The signature 

i°ven P K 6^0?o I"'— 6 '«• 'om^^silTL': tore C S arge sL m d a a y 

~c7ur¥NJA~lA7rolMsin»]FTn^ 

r^„. ht Paid-up Capital, M.ooo.ooo. 

j. s° fry !ssr Y akd cali F oe HIASieeets , san Feakcisco . 

Funds. Will take entire charee of R S «l g „1 / e J ,osltar >; 10 / Coi "t and Trust 
the income and proflte^andattendinlto a°l suchT a » 1 ,, E5 ' a,es '- co , 11 e ctio ? 
in like capacity could do '" , ' euuln e to all such details as an individual 

r^Sf^^SS^ of two 

bearing fixed rates of interest Dalances - Issu es certificates of deposits 
thf Sfr^ol'i'ntTresl ,her D e„n d ' Partment fr0m !1 u P wa ^s, and allows 
cent per annum P annum, and on Ordinary Deposits 4 1-6 per 

an^'^p^dTfc'coriltgt si a 2 e g, Ta P . r u a°b f le V s a o U f lt a„ a L P n iCeS *T » p " 
atlowrates. valuables of all kinds may be stored 

^H^RjWLANDTAKENC^ 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

CAPITAL PAID w , Incor > JOra 'ea by Royal Charter, 1862. 

RESERVE FUND...'.'.'. $3,000,000 

HEAD oFFICE heaStCCrner «n Sband8ansom e St^etsV ■ " , ' 390 - 000 

BMCHES vf ■■;; 6 ° LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

Washington. '' Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Tacoma 

Je^ *i££Z£%£ft?gg$^™™*^U opened suh- 
available in all part* of the P world Anorovp,? mn e . r S' al 0re ': lt , 6 grante o 
vances made on good collateral securitv P nS, 3, 1 - 8 dls eounted and ad- 
upon its Head Office and 1 Branehe f and L„J W , S d T ect at current rates 

NEW YORK-Merchants n?n? „1 S p, i n lts A «ents, as follows: 
Bank; LIVERPOOL-Sortn L Sn, ,h° w!?'' : CHICAGO-First National 
Linen Company; IRE^AND-Bank ol 'Ireland- M a FlTr S n° T TLA / D -„ Briti6h 
Mexico; SOUTH AMERICA-Londoi S „T„ BXICO— London Bank of 
CHINA and JAPAN-Chfrtel?d SSnV „, {^f x ' coanQ8 o ut h America; 
AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND-Eant J.?*!*' ( A " st ? alia an d China 
cial Banking Company of Sydney Ld DJrM?| t i a i a , 8ia a , nQ ' c ™™' ; 
(West Indiesl-Colonial Bank 7 ' " DEMBK AKA and TRINIDAD 



capital BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN 

Surplns and Undivided ProfitMJan.Visgsj, *I'?SS'2S22S 

Thomas Ebowk. W r*asW L J , K ?' Resident: S - 276 .«« B » 

S. Peentiss Smith,' Asst.' Cashier. ' Moulton, 2d Assistant Cashier. 

NatFoIfSaST^NrToN^ 

Messrs. De Rothschild F^eres viRGINIA cttv ™5 f S . ons - PA W8- 

Bank of California. CHICAGO-tTnion wJh™ IT \ (N , EV -)-Agency of The 

& &s. SrSErSn^'v-"- - 

holm Christiania, MelbouTne, Sydney AuoW.^d m ij Co Penhagen, Stock- 
Yokohama L Genoa L and all cities "lr! 1 IuSy A uckland - Hongkong, Shanghai, 

A ^~^F s " in N r SAT7Rlui^ 

Authorized capital ,3.500,000 | Capital paid .i^'.^o m 

Manager, ARTHUR SirSL^T, ?"«' ' ' M PaC "" : A,enue - 

THnE cS^^u E 8Tir^IED M E a B n i a c : H r ' WILUAM STML 

Ohange Business , Ie Knd^o?aadto I?rSnrt^ °i?l ne / al Ba h^ng and Ex- 
all parts of the world: Francisco, and between said cities and 

~THr™iTsAViN6s iNyToATsociEfy; 

QUARANTEECAP 5 iT G »P a i l L A n L^I ,,ee '- San F'ancisco. 

Depo.tt, Jan°*?8M L AND ""ERVE FUND | 1,770,000 00. 

Eggers, O. Schoemann F E Tjiim°S n °h «o C r t< S _Edw i K / U l e ' Q e° r Ke H. 
Simon, Ign. Steinhart, B^Jt^ S£SS^Ji£££?: ^ ^ 



Jan. 87, 1891. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



T?1E RoSEj^ 




THE END.-.)I( IA« )V.ir Round. 

'HE end draws near. It? I»tes unseen directed 
Oar paths diverging tend. 
To lives monotonous the unexpected 

Cornea as a friend. 
While (or a moment joyous smiles of meeting 
The gathering shades diapel. 
i Ave et Vale! " Lo! the ancient greeting: 
Hail and Farewell! 

A moment more! And sadness follows after, 

In bursts of keen regret, 
That put to silence all the happy laughter 

Wherewith we met. 
The past is dead, the present swiftly fadiDg, 

And in the future dwell 
Hopes faint and few, our longing glance evading, 

Hail and Farewell! 

The time has cornel 'Jlid alien scenes and faces 

Our lessening lives must lie, 
And pass henceforth through solitary places 

Beneath a stormy sky. 
Clasp hands, old friends! Against our best endeavor 

The tides of memory swell. 
Fart we as toose who part indeed forever; 

Hail and Farewell! 



SOLDIER'S SONG IN " MERCEDES."— T. B. Atdtieh. 

The camp is bushed; the fires burn low; 
Like ghosts the sentries come and go; 
Now seen, now lost, upon the height 
A keen drawn saber glimmers white. 
Swiftly the midnight steals away — 
Reposez-vous, bons chevaliers. 

Perchance into your dreams shall come 
Visions of love or thoughts of home; 
The furtive night wind, buirying by, 
Shall kiss away the half-breathed sigh, 
And softly whispering, seem to say, 
Reposez vous, bons chevaliers. 

Through atailit dusk and shimmering dew 
It is your lady come to you! 
Delphine, Lisette, Annette — who knows 
By what sweet wayward name she goes ? 
Wrapped in white arms till break of day, 
Reposez-vous, bons chevaliers. 

LOVE AND THOUGHT.— James Russell Lowell. 

What hath love with thought to do? 
Still at variance are the two. 
Love is sudden, love is rash, 
Love is like the levin flash, 
Comes as swift, as swiftly goes, 
And his mark as surely knows. 

Thought is lumpish, thought is slow, 
Weighing long 'tween yes and no; 
When dear love is dead and gone, 
Thought comes creeping in anon, 
And, in his deserted nest, 
Sits to hold the crowner's quest. 

Since we love, what need to think ? 
Happiness stands on a brink 
Whence too easy 'tis to fall 
Whither's no return at ail; 
Have a care, half-hearted lover, 
Thought would only push her overl 



-B-AJSTICS. 



SWEET, DEAR SINS SHALL LEAD ME.— Philip B. Marston. 

I said "To-morrow!" one bleak winter day— 
"To-morrow I will live my life anew," — 
And still " To-morrow! " while the winter grew 

To spring, and yet I dallied by the way, 

And sweet, dear sins still held me in their sway: 

" To-morrow ! " I said, while summer days wore thro' ; 
" To-morrow!" while chill autumn around me drew; 

And so my soul remained the sweet sin's prey. 

So pass the years, and still, perpetually, 

I cry " To-morrow will I flee each wile — 

To-morrow, snrely, shall my soul stand free, 
Safe from the siren voices that beguile I " 
But death waits by me, with a mocking smile, 

And whispers: " Yea! To-morrow, verily! ". 



WELLS, FAR60 & CO.'S BANK. 

W. E. « oriicr *mi»nm* hih! Nnlttr MriN-ln. 
JAH FRANCISCO. CAL. 

CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $6,150,000.00 

John J. Vai.intini . Prcnldcnt. 

Bllim 8, Kiso ... Manager. 

II. Wadmtokth cannier. 

F. I.. LiruAN . A»sl»taut Cannier. 

BRAHCHB8. 
Sew York Oily 11. M. PARSONS, Cannier. 

Salt Lake City J. K. DOOLY, Cashier. 

DIRECTORS * 
John J. Valentino, BenJ. P, Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge, Henry E. Hunting- 
ton. HomerS. Kills. Geo. E. ..my, John J. McConk, ('has, F. Crocker, 
Dudley Evans. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 



Geo. A. Low, 
N. Van Bergen, 
Thomas Jennings, 



IV \\ . Corner SaiiNome and HunIi Street*. 

Established 1870. U. S. Depositary. 

CAPITAL {PAID UP) ... $1,600,000 

SURPLUS $700.000| UNDIVIDED PROFITS $186,000 

8. G. MURPHY. President I E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT. Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

DIRECTORS; 

George C. Perkins, 8. G. Murphy, 

James D. Phelan, James Moffltt. 

John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking; BunIiicmn TranHacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 
Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 
the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p.m . 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES 1). PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-PresidentB 

Directors — James G. Fair, Edward Barron, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James D. Phelan, JameB Moffltt, 8. G. Murphy, ChaB. Cadwalader 
and Frank J. Sullivan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
securities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deporits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK. Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel ourt, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Sen man <fe Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking lusiness, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
worlu. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART ) Wo „ OM » B 

P.N.LILIENTHAL.i Managers 
A. L. SELIGMAN, Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cop. Sansome and. Sutter Ste. 

Sdbacrlbid Capital $2,500,000 | Paid UpCapltat $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $750,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Aoents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), No. 10 Wall 8t.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Laxard Freres A Cle, 17Boule 
vard Poissonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
merclal and Travelers' Credits issued. 

BIG. GREENEBAUM, ( Morio „„ D 
C. ALTSCHUL, \ Managers. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $1,250,000. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 
JAMES K. WILSON President 

J. L.N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. L. I. COWGILL, Cashier. 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, ytm. P. John- 
eon, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shi pley A Co. Paris— Drexel. Harjes & Co. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

322 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS: 

William Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin A. K. P. Harmon, 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones J.B. Randol. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL 11.000.000. 

nmECWRS: 

CHA8. F. CROCKER, | E. B. POND. 

WM. H. CROCKER PBB8IDBNT 

W. E. BROWN VICI-PBE8IBENT. 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashibb 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY- 

No. 18 Geary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November 24. 1869 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President | BRN3T BRAND Secretary 



18 



SAK FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan 27, 1884. 




SPORT and moral teaching wilt be happily combined if a chal- 
lenge recently issued bears fruit. Mr. Whittaker, who is 
eighty-one years of age, and has been a total abstainer for fifty- 
nine years, offered at a recent temperance demonstration in Lon- 
don to run a race with any one whohad frequented public houses 
for the same period. From the opposite camp has come a truly 
Bporting reply. Mr. Robert Musgrave, proprietor of the Royal 
Hotel, Workington, announces that bis father, who is ninety- 
three, and has drunk whisky for seventy years, is ready to run 
Mr. Whittaker 50 yards, if he is allowed one yard start for every 
year by which his age exceeds that of the tetotaler. As this 
means that the champion of " barley bree" has only to cover 38 
yards while his opponent runs 50, it is evident that his three- 
score-and-ten years' experience with alcohol has not dulled his 
faculty for making a bargain. 

The oft-tried matrimonial trick has been revived again in Paris, 
the dupe being a municipal councilor from a country borough. 
The swindlers were, as usual, a man and woman. The latter is 
Mdlle. Blanche, very good looking and still young. She was ad- 
vertised as a marriageable person with a dowry of £20,000. There 
was a hitch in her antecedents, for according to her male com- 
panion, who represented her as bis sister, she bad been deceived 
by a former lover. This (ache, as it was called in the advertise- 
ment, did not disconcert the provincial, who came, saw and 
thought he had conquered. After he had made the damsel costly 
presents of brooches and braceleis, and bpent in all £480 for her 
benefit, she decamped from her Paris address with her so-called 
brother. Blanche and her confederate have, however, been dis- 
covered in a pleasant suburb of the city, and they have been 
arrested. 

In a recent essay on " The Literary Cranks of London," by a 
member of the recently established Omar Khayyam Club, he 
Btates that while they are still as the sands of the seashore for 
number, they are at present rather inconspicuous. The Words- 
worth Society no longer meets, the Goethe Society not often, the 
Shelley Society has a ghastly burden of debt (as its illustrious 
namesake used to have) and the Browning Society, with its blue 
spectacled lady members, has spent most of its treasure in sugar 
plums. The most flourishing of the clubs or organizations of this 
sort are now the Sette of Odd Volumes, the Johnson Club, the 
Vagabonds and the Ghouls. 

Good shorthand writers are scarce in France. The post of 
shorthand writer in the Chamber of Deputies is vacant. The 
work n exceedingly laborious, and within the past few years four 
stenographers have become insane, two have lost their eyesight, 
and many were rendered helpless through overwork or » writer's 
cramp." Some of the speakers in the Chamber are so rapid in 
their utterances as to be the despair of the shorthand writers. 
A dozen stenographers succeed one another every two minutes 
at the foot of the orators' tribune. 

Of 1000 men married in 1891 ia England and Wales (according 
to the report of the Registrar-General), 886 were bachelors and 114 
were widowers; while of 1000 women who married, 919 were 
spinsters and 81 were widows. Tbe proportions of bachelors and 
spinsters were the highest recorded. The proportions of widow- 
ers and widows have been declining for many years. 



A dogs' tailor flourishes in Paris. The tailor is a woman, and 
in her reception rooms Prince Bow-wow has rugs, water bowls 
and biscuit jars to refresh him during the trying-on process. Here 
are the daintiest water-color pattern books to choose from, and 
anything from sealskin to chamois is provided. 

Some of the native women of Australia have a queer idea of 
beauty. They cut themselves with shells, keep the wounds open 
for a long time, and when they heal huge scars are the result. 
These scars are deemed highly ornamental. 

Queen Christina of Spain rises every morning at half-past five 
and goes out for a walk. The German Emperor gets up at six, 
Francis Joseph of Austria before five, and the Czar — who probably 
sleeps badly — generally as early as 3 a. m. 

Queen Victoria has a large and peculiarly shaped hand, and 
wears a 1\ glove. 

For a rest, a daintily cooked and neatly served luncheon or elabo- 
rate meal the ladies of the havt monde of San Francisco go to the 
Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street. Here one is assured of 
freedom from contact with unpleasant surroundings of every charac- 
ter, and it is here that dinners can be ordered for special occasions at 
home. 



UN" STTZR-A-HSTOIE . 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

IN8URANOE COMPANY, 

OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL, $1,000,000. | ASSETS, $3,000,000. 
AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., 
Gen'l Managers. 

40 to AA PINE STREET, NEW YORK. 

Assets {2,607,675 76 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,139,756 99 

HAZAKDS INSURED. 

EMPLOYERS AND PUBLIC LIABILITY, 
BOILER EXPLOSION, 
GENERAL CASUALTY, 
ELEVATOR ACCIDENT, 
SPRINKLER LOSSES. 
GENERAL ACCIDENT, AND 
FIDELITY. 
BOLGER & BURLING, General Agents, 

403 California Street. 

William Macdonald, Manager. D. E. Miles, Ass't Manager. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

C APITAL $10,63 7,50 

Net Surplus Over all Liabilities 3,116,305 

315 Montgomery Street. --■---. San Francisc o 
NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORTCOSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Ion». Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 
Office of the Company, 202 Sansome St.. over (he Anglo-Callfornla Bask. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OP HAMBURG, GERMANY. 

Geo. Leonard and II. Danker, Managers p. t. for the Pacific Coast 

Branch, 

230 Sansome St., S. F. 

Capital $1,500,000.00 

Infested in U. S 640,346.23 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
__^_ 333 California St., S.F.,€aI. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO- of New York., 
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO.. of Toronto- 

A. R. GURREY, Manager. | C. A. STUART, A88T. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 
BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL J6,700,000 

AOBNTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
No. 316 California Street. San Francisco 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, 

413 California Street, San Francisco 



.T u 



1894. 



san ri:\M isoo news i.i.i n i: 



18 



■&5UNBCAMS 




VA88AR girls bad a private laugh not long along at the eulogy 
bestowed by a French gentleman whose admiration for the 
young undergraduates considerably exceeded his ability to speak 
it In English. He had met the young women at one or two day ft-- 
tivities. and was sufficiently Impressed, hut when at an evening recep- 
tion they buret upon him in the bravery of full dress, the admiring 
Gaul felt at once the handicaps of his vocabulary. " 1 cannot say, 
he confided to one of his hosts, "how beautiful the young ladies 
appear in their nitfht-dresses." V 5 

Nellie's dainty, unshod foot 

In its gay red stocking, 
Is a sunbeam just allowed 
To peep from underneath a cloud, 

Glistening and mocking. 
'Spose the cloud should pass away, 
Wouldn't that be shocking! 

— Washington Capitol. 
" The young lady whom you propose as a suitable wife for Count 

X has no stain on her character or that of her family ? " " Not 

a shadow." " But I think I remember having heard that her father 
in Russia — " '" He died of apoplexy. Quite right* signora. One 
morning at 5 o'clock, it appears some practical joker perpetrated the 
foolish trick of placing a running noose around his neck and suspend- 
ing him to an apparatus in shape like an arm. He died very suddenly, 
poor man ! " — Z' Osservatore Romano. 

A very entertaining divorce case is likely to engage the attention 
of the courts ere long. The parties all move, or did move, in the high- 
est society. The co-respondent, it would appear, was caught by the 
injured husband in his wife's boudoir. The injured husband was just 
starting on a mammoth oath, when his wife rose with a stately uiein, 
and said with much dignity: '"I trust.. Tohn, you will have the common 
decency not to make a scene before a stranger! " 

— London Topical Times. 
An illiterate young man once got a friend to write a letter for him 
to his sweetheart. The letter was rather prosaic for a love-letter, and 
he felt that an apology was due to his sweetheart for its lack of tender 
nothings. It was as" follows: ''Please excuse the mildness of this 
here letter, as the chap ^vot's 'ritin' it is a married man, and he says 
he carn't 'bide any soft soapings; it alius gives him the spazzums." 

— London Spare Moments. 
She had called at her husband's office and she told him that in case 
he got home first he would find the key where she had hidden it on 
the porch. He did get home first, and he found this notice in his 
wife's handwriting in a conspicuous place on the front door : '■ Dear 
Fred : I have hidden the key so that no one can find it but you. It 
is under the left lower corner of the door-mat." — Chicago Record. 

"Woolly Wiglets— Wot makes yer pockets bulge out that way, 
Willy? Willy Winks— That's the result of one day's bracing— 
fifty-three meal tickets, twenty-eight cards good for pails o' coal an' 
bundles o' wood an' five certificates of character, each one good for a 
new suit of clothes, or an overcoat. —Brooklyn Eagle. 

" She is the flower of the family." observed the proud father to 
Straight-Griffin, as the latter had just completed a most fascinating 
waltz with the latest object of his affections. " Yes, she is that," re- 
plied Griffin, carefully brushing away yet another white patch from 
his coat sleeve. — London Topical Times. 

'• When Johnnie starts to use his voice 
He never will desist; 
I guess he'll be a Congressman, 

Or else a pugilist." — Washington Star. 

Mrs. de Fashion— Did you take (he medicine the doctor ordered ? 
Small Daughter— Yes, and it was horrid. Mrs. de Fashion— Did 
you take a teaspoonful ? Small Daughter — N-o, I took a forkful. 
Spoons are out of fashion, you know, mama. — Ex. 

"The death of her husband must have been a dreadful blow to 
Mrs. Musicale." '• It was, indeed." "I suppose she has given up 
her piano playing entirely ? " " No, she still plays ; but only on the 
black keys." — Ex. 

Mrs. de Sieve — Mrs. Newrich appears to have lost faith in Dr. 
Hightone lately. Mrs. De Sided — Of course ! Why, he didn't order 
her to go to Europe, or to do anything fashionable the last time she 
was ill. — Town Topics. 

" But how do you know that Fenderson is a fool ? " " Why, they 
selected him as a juryman in a murder trial without challenge on 
either side." — Boston Transcript. 



The Popular Winter Route. 
If you are going Fast it will be to your advantage to write to or 
call on the undersigned before arranging for your trip. The " Santa 
Fe Route " is the only line running palace and tourist sleeping cars 
Through to Chicago every day on the same train. Select excursions 
leave every Tuesday, with manager in charge, through to Boston. 
Accommodations and train service unequaled by any line. W. A. 
Bissell, General Passenger Agent, 650 Market street (Chronicle Build- 
ing) San Francisco, Cal. 

The popularity of Japanese ornaments for the house is one of the 
rare evidences of an artistic taste on the part of the people, and, un- 
derstanding this, George T. Marsh, on Market street, under the Pal- 
ace Hotel, keeps a large and varied assortment. 

Thousands of mothers give their children Steedman's Soothing 
Powders during the teething period. 



Th> bearing of a man with well-fitting, stylish clothes is easily 
distinguishable from ilmi <.f one wbOM Clothes fit bndlv. The mm 
who have their clothes made by Colonel J. M. Litchfield, the popular 
tailor at L3 Post street, arc noted ("T the elegance <■( their bearing, »•< 

well as of their clothea 



j: _r>r a u R.A. isr o :e . 



PACIFIC IDIEI'ARTIMIIEISrT 

6UARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1821. 
Paid-up Capital, ■ - - I .s.OOO.OOO. 
Cash Assets, %X,1'M,249. 



OF LONDON. 

Founded a. I>. 1710. 

Cash Assets, 110,044,712. 

Assets lu America, - - - $2,510,808. 



WM. J. LMDERS, flen'l .Unit, 20H Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 



THE NEW EN6LAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS. Assets 519.724.538.46. 

President, BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. | Vice-Pres., ALFRED D. FOSTEK 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 

Mills Build i nq Uontqomery Street, San Francisco. 
INSURE your property against FIKE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Co. Limited, of London. 
The Imperial Insurance Co. Limited, of London 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager 

Pacific Branch, 221 Sansome St., S. F. 

SWAIN & MURDOCH, City Agents. 

THE 



FIRE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BASLE. OF ST. GALL. OF ZUKICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 

_____ 410 California St. , San Francisco, Cal 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Llmltid) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000, 000 

Cash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 8,124,067.00 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 
305 California Street. San Francisco. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up $ 500,000 

Assets 8.181,768 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,526,16V 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 
City Offlce— 501 Montgomery St. General OMce— 401 Mont'g.St. 

AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. 

Established 1825. 
Capital, $2,250,000. Total Assets, 36,854,653.65 

United States Department; 204 SANSOME ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

YOSS, COXKAO A CO., General Managers. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1886.) 
Office — Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Street. 

G EO. F. BRAST, Manager 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH AMERICA 

«3^*01dest Stock Fire Insurance Company in the United States. 

Capital Fully Paid $3,000 ( 00 

OF PHILADELPHIA, Penn, 
Office Pacific Defabtment— 

412 California Street, San Francisco. 
JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jan. 27, 1894. 




SOME of the most wonderful costumes of the year are the 
dresses made entirely of fur. A costume made by a French 
designer is of Astrakhan, trimmed with black: Mongolian goat. 
The skirt is entirely of Astrakhan, with a band of the goat form- 
ing a crinkled fringe around the bottom, another band half way 
up, and a third a few inches below the belt. The bodice is a lit- 
tle jacket made of the Astrakhan, with two rows of fur-covered 
buttons and shawl revers of the crinkled Mongolian. A gown of 
Canada mink has a triple skirt, the lower division plain, the up- 
per two divisions each fringed with mink tails. The waist has a 
corsage of golden brown veloutine with large sleeves of the same 
terminating in mink cuffs, and the costume is completed with a 
mink cape. Many cloth street gowns have entire waists of fur 
in the form of double-breasted Eton jackets. A very showy 
Paris gown has a skirt of blacfc Astrakhan with a red Russian 
blouse falling to the knee and confined by a Russian metal belt. 
The straight collar and deep cuPs are of the fur. 

Underskirts grow more bewitching, and those in white cam- 
bric trimmed with yellow lace are lovely. Silk ones are always 
charming, but there is a perennial freshness about cambric which 
even silk cannot rival.- After each visit to the washtub the cam- 
bric renews its youth, while too many visits to the laundry 
brings the white silk petticoat to early ruin. Brocade underskirts 
are both pretty and durable, and we are glad to see there is no 
longer such a rage for petticoats that rustle. 

There have been very few of the coal-scuttle bonnet shapes 
worn this winter, although there were a few imported. They are 
becoming to very few people, and as the Salvation Army bonnet 
has somewhat the same effect (being worn further back on the 
head, however), the fashion, unless it is revived in the light 
straws next summer, faced with the roses and other flowers that 
our great-grandmothers delighted to wear, is not likely to become 
a popular model. 

There is a great variety in the cloaks worn with ball gowns. 
Some are made quite short and others reach the bottom of the 
skirt. White satin, white brocade, all sorts of fancy materials 
and velvets are nsed for these wraps. They are all made with a 
fall, fluffy effect about the collar, and many a girl looks much 
prettier inthem than in anything else she wears. 

A new fancy of the romantic sweet girl of leisure that brings a 
thriving trade for stationers is for silver or vellum bound dream 
books, which esoteric maids keep upon the dressing table, where- 
in they religiously note the wonderful dream phases of their 
nightly slumber. These are preserved for discussion and com- 
parison at a meeting of some psychological circle. 

It is now an absolutely settled fact that for a hostess to wear at 
her own afternoon receptions full ball-dress in very bad form. 
This year the reception dresses, while most elaborate in the mak- 
ing, being of handsome material and trimmed very elaborately, 
are made high-necked and long-sleeved, and are vastly better style. 

A scent bottle of nugget gold, over which are scattered reck- 
lessly rubies, sapphires and small garnets, is among the latest 
fads. The bottom of the case can be unscrewed, and it then can 
be used as a parasol handle. 

"We have seen two very pretty and most artistic hats this last 
week. They were made of silk beaver, black, the shape showing 
a large, curving front, the lines of which were most becoming to 
the face. 



The Overland Flyer. 



The Union Pacific is the only line running new Pullman 
double drawing-room sleepers and dining cars, San Fran- 
cisco to Chicago, without change, in three and one-half 
days. All tickets good via Salt Like City and Denver. 

Select Tourist Excursions through to Chicago, without 
change, every Thursday in charge of managers. 

Steamship tickets on sale to and from all points in Eu- 

For sleeping-car accomodations and tickets call on D. W. Hitch- 
cock, General Agent, 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco; F. R. 
Ellsworth, Agent, 918 Broadway, Oakland, Cal.; or G. F. Herr, 229 
South Spring street, Los Angeles, Cal. 




rope. 



The half tone engravings, which for a long time have been a 
popular and artistic feature of the News Letter, are from the studio 
of Bolton & Strong, of 430 Pine street. The firm, which give par- 
ticular attention to this line of work, are at the head of their pro- 
fession upon the Pacific Coast. Their half-tone engravings are un- 
excelled in the West. They have far more than a local reputation, 
being widely known as excellent artists and artisans. 



/WUR 



Q<?arar?ee Sale 

NOW IN PROGRESS. 

STARTLING 
REDUCTIONS 

IN 

EVERY 
DEPARTMENT. 

See daily papers for particulars. 




Murphy Building. 




IRS. W. E.SPENCER, 



HAIR 

STORE. 



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Elegant Manicuring and Hair Dressing Parlors. 
Pacific Coast wholesale and retail agent for 
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CREME BEATRICE, the most delightful toilet 
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WITCH HAZEL COLD CREAM, cooling, healing, refreshing; does not 
leave the skin greasy. You will like it. Price, 35c. 

"BEAU BRUMMELL" Finder Nail Polish; instantaneous in its effect; a 
beautiful polish and a delicate pink tint to the nail : beneficial . Price, 50c. 
The above and a full line of superior Toilet and Manicure Goods manu- 
factured by ISABEL CASSIDY, 30 West Twenty-third street. New York, and 
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26 Geary St., S. F., Cal. 




J\)e B<?st Scores 

ARE MADE WITH THE 

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For fine shooting they are simply perfect. V^arCrlayeS. 

ZISKA INSTITUTE, 

1604-1606 VAN NESS AVEME, San Francisco. 

French, German and English day and boarding school for young ladies 
and children. Next term begins August 3, 1893. For prospectus, address 

MME. B. ZISKA. A. M., Principal. 






Jan . 27, 1894 . 



s\\ n:\\. [» NEWS I i in l; 



21 



H 



THE HINTER. 

E mi o'er bis wine »nl he lold aa tales, 

All tbe usual Uddlfrtaddte, 
01 wonderful run> OTer distant dales. 

And thp progress be ibowad In the saddle; 
The jumps that he look were of wondrous size, 

The brooks little- lc*s than rirers— 
Lord save us all from the sort of lies 

That a hunliniMiisn delivers! 

He talked away with a peaceful smile 

And a look of the utmost candor; 
As he told us tales l>y the English mile 

In a way that raised -iur dander. 
Sure never a man hail such hair-breadth 'scapes 

From most imminent deadly danger. 
And none ever pulled through such hopeless scrapes, 

As our too loquacious stranger. 

He came to the meet on the following day, 

Josl to show us the an of riding! 
And got well to the front at tbe first "Gone Away! " 

A stout little brown bestriding; 
He kept in his place in the foremost ranks, 

Though the pace got quickly hotter, 
Till bis mount stopped short on the muddy banks, 

When we came to some open water. 

He described a beautiful arc in the air, 

As he rose to this great occasion, 
Then he sank with a splash and a sounding swear, 

And the roar of a Bull of Basban ; 
His horse, no doubt, tossed him in pell-mell 

As a hint, or a slight reminder. 
That he knew that Truth's in the deepsome well, 

For he sent him there to find her. 

LL the good Congressmen are not dead — they have not yet 
1 been elected. 



Your dealer in lamp-chim- 
neys- what does he get (or; 

\ ou can't be an expert in 
chimneys ; but this you can 
<lo. Insist on Macbeth's 
"pearl top" or "pearl glass " 
whichever shape yen require 
1 hi y are right in all those 

ways; and they do not bn ak 
from heat, not one in a hun- 
dred. 

I ■ ■ v MlinE to pay a nickel more for them. 
I'lltsl.urgh. (..,,,. a. Al m iikih Co. 




palo fUto Stably. 

E. R. MILES, Prop. 

320 O'Farrell St. S. F. 

Two blocks from the Baldwin Hotel. 

Telephone No. 2015. 



[ESTABLISHED 1862.J 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE, 

J. Tomkinson, Proprietor, 

Nos. 57, 59 and 61 Minna Street, between First aDd Second. 

Through to Natoma street, Nos. 64, 60 and 68. One block from the Palace 

Hotel, also carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, corner Post and 

StocKton streets, San Francisco. Telephone No. 153. 

Fine turnouts kept especially for calling. Also rockaways, buggies and 
vehicles of every description at reduced rates. 



A GRUMBLING ACTOR. 

SAY8 an English paper: "There is no 
grambler like your disappointed actor. 
Mr. Richard Mansfield, an Anglo-American 
who failed to convince the English public 
that he was a Kean, Macready, or an Irv- 
ing, and who played Richard the Third in 
the manner of Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde, 
seriously proposes a poll-tax on all distin- 
guished actors who visit America. He 
thinks that a prohibitive tariff on the 
Pattis, I)e Reskes, Calv6s, Kendala, Bern- 
hardts, Coquelins, and Irvings will give 
work to the unemployed American actors 
and aggrandize the fame of Mr. Richard 
Mansfield- A more absurd proposition 
was never made. America is never likely 
to boycott artists of distinction, and the 
increased prices that they command ia a 
perfectly natural feature in dramatic trade. 
The rule in America about prices is a very 
sensible one. There is a low normal price 
for every seat in a theatre, and it is in- 
creased whenever a star is announced. 
This is the rule that is observed in all pro- 
vincial theatres in England. A special at- 
traction commands special prices." 



CHILE is evidently determined not to be 
behind in the matter of national expo- 
sitions, and the announcement is now 
made that it will hold an exhibition of min- 
ing machinery at Santiago in April next. 
The proviso is of course understood, <• if 
peace prevails," which stands for the par- 
enthetic deus volens in this revolutionary 
part of the world. The eight sections of the 
exhibition will comprise electricity, min- 
ing machinery, mechanical preparations of 
minerals, metallurgy, chemical industries, 
statistics and plans, and mining and met- 
allurgical products respectively. 



THE depositors of the People's Home 
Savings Bank are to be congratulated 
on the decision of Judge Sanderson, 
which makes them richer by about $200,- 
000. He has confirmed their title to the 
old Pacific Bank property, on Sansome 
and Pine streets, in this city. 



What Our Most Eminent Food Authority Says. 

JVo. 111. OFFICE OF STATE ANALYST, 

BERKELEY, !?.°I.-. ?.L>. |8 9 3 ..:... 

Certificate ok Analysis. 



Dr. J. R. LAINE, See'y State Board of Health 

I have examined sample marked Gail Borden 

Eagle. .Br and? received. !l2Eii_i°j /<??..?... 

and report as follows : 

I have made a bacteriological exami- 
nation of this Condensed Milk, and find it 
remarkably free from any micro-organisms- 
This investigation has shown it to be free 
from any disease germs, and on this account 
I do not hesitate to endorse it as a healthy 
article of food for infants or adults. 

Signed, 





DUPLICATE. 



State Analyst and Prof. Chemistry, 

University of Cal. 



22 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 27, 1894, 




IT required no small amount of courage on the part of the ladies 
to leave the comfort of their own firesides and face the warring 
of the elements last Saturday, even though teas were the lure 
which drew them forth. Mrs. Pond's rooms were at times 
crowded to an almost uncomfortable degree, and the men showed 
forth in larger numbers at each reception than on any other tea 
day this winter. It is possible that the inclemency of the day 
made it more difficult to get from one house to the other, and 
hence visitors were not as well able to take them all in as if the 
day had been more propitious. Mrs. Foute, Mrs. Breyfogle, 
Mrs. Pond, Mrs. McAllister and Mrs. Rodolph were the hostesses, 
each of whom had a bevy of maids and young matrons tD help 
them do the honors. At Mrs. Rodolph's it was a sort of double 
entertainment to the Ladies Club of '93— tea from 3 till 6, and 
music from 8 till 10, after which there was dancing till after mid- 
night. 

Mrs. Alvord's pink lunch table was surrounded by eighteen 
ladies, a happy mingling of old and young matrons about equally 
divided. Mrs. Will Tevis's lunch and Mrs. J. F. Merrill's dinner 
were among the feasts of Thursday last. On Friday Mrs. George 
Pope was " at home " for the first time in her elegant new resi- 
dence on Pacific avenue, and several dinners took place as a pre- 
lude to the third cotillion of the Friday Night Club at Odd Fel- 
lows Hall, which was the last of the present series, as their final 
party will be an Assembly during Easier week in March. The 
night, in point of weather, was most unpleasant, but the dance 
was one of the best they have given, Mr. Greenway as leader 
having Miss Carrie Taylor as his partner, and the five figures gone 
through, while none of them were new, were all pretty and well- 
danced. 

The members of the Ban Francisco Verein Club had an enjoya- 
ble time of it last Saturday evening, when they indulged in a 
jinks and supper in their rooms on Sutter street. The entertain- 
ment consisted of music, witty addresses, topical songs, and a 
burlesque or two, which were received with unstinted applause 
and much laughter, and the whole affair was a most pronounced 
success. 

Mrs. and Miss Houghton's rooms at the Palace Hotel were 
pleasantly filled on Monday, when their second tea took place. 
The informal dance at the Misses Hobart's, on Monday evening, 
was a very pleasant little gathering of young people. A cotillion 
was the feature of the occasion, followed by supper, and a more 
delightful way of passing the time their guests declared it would 
be impossible to imagine. Among other events of the week may 
be noted the musicale at Madame Ziska's on Tuesday evening, 
the meeting of the Fortnightly Club at the Goads on Wednesday 
evening, the meeting of the Ladies' Club of '93 at Miss Virginia 
Stump's on Thursday evening, the party of the Entre Nous Club 
at the Palace Hotel, the Held b,y the Enemy, performances at Stock- 
well's Theatre, and the Oakland Cotillion Club dance on Friday, 
at which George Wheaton held the position of leader. 



Teas were this week rather conspicuous by their absence. Pos- 
sibly a feeling of surfeit after last week's crowd of them caused a 
revulsion for the moment. The most elaborate tea of the week 
was the one given on Thursday by Mrs. J. I). .Fry, who had at 
hand every concomitant to make it a success. The house is large 
and roomy, and was very tastefully decorated; the hostess was 
surrounded with a most attractive corps of assistants. There were 
delicious refreshments, excellent music to add to the charms, and 
a large number of guests present. The Joseph A. Donahoes are 
among the few who still cling to Rincrtn Hill, one of the old-time 
fashionable residence districts of San Francisco, and in their still 
handsome and very comfortable old homestead, on Harrison 
street, Mrs. Donahoe held the first of her "at homes" on Wednes- 
day, which also was the first entertainment, save dinners, that 
she has given for several years. 



The marriage of Miss Alvina Heuer and Fred E. Wilson was- 
solemnized last Friday afternoon at the Heuer residence, on 
Taylor street, the Reverend E. B. Spaulding officiating, the bridal 
party standing beneath a bower constructed in the back parlor. 
The invited guests at the ceremony were limited to the relatives 
and a few intimate friends, who, after the tying of the nuptial 
knot, were entertained at a wedding dinner, after which came 
the reception, which lasted from 9 till 11. The rooms were 
prettily decorated with flowers and foliage, and the bride looked 
charming in a robe of white brocaded silk, en traine, trimmed 
with mousseline de soic. The veil was of white silk moleine and the 
hand bouquet was formed of orange blossoms. Miss Bert Heuer 
and Miss Alice Mooser were two pretty bridesmaids, and George 
Heuer and A. F. 8chleicher officiated as groomsmen, two pretty 
little children acting as flower bearers. 



News of weddings and of engagements come from across the 
bay. Last week Miss May Phillips and Giles Nelson Easton, of 
New York, were united at the home of the bride's parents by the 
Reverend Robert F. Coyle, of the First Presbyterian Church, 
after which an elaborate supper was served in a specially-built 
room. Among the engagements are those of Miss Elsie Bennett 
to an Englishman, Mr. Eagelby; Miss Grace Wade to A. P. Hol- 
land, and Miss Fannie Scott to C. R. Selfridge. Hops and euchre 
parties continue to be the features at the Hotel Metropole. 

Miss Sarah Samuels, the pretty, bright fiancGe of Superintendent 
Stern of the Omnibus Cable Co., and whose marriage is set to 
take place on the first of March, was the guest of honor at a 
handsome luncheon given by Misses Berwin last week, to which 
a dozen other ladies were invited to meet the bride-elect. 



The week has been well filled with dinners and luncheons both 
large and small, and among them few pleasanter than the enter- 
tainments given by Mrs. O. P. Evans in honor of her sister and 
niece, Mrs. and Miss Worden, who are at present her guests ; and 
the dinner given by Mrs. W. H. Taylor, in honor of her niece, 
Miss Clara Taylor, of Sacramento, who is spending several weeks 
with her aunt, on California street. Music, too, has had its 
votaries, and one of the most enjoyable little parties of the week 
was the musicale given by Mrs. W. R. Hervey, of Jackson street, 
on Tuesday evening, at which the Chevalier de Kontski was 
guest of honor. On Wednesday evening Professor Jordan bad a 
very large attendance at his lecture before the Geographical Soci- 
ety on the Hospice of 8t. Bernard. 

Some surprise has been expressed at the unusual absence of 
teas arranged for Saturday this week, it being the day that men 
have the most leisure to attend such affairs. But it should he 
borne in mind that in view of the inaugural ceremonies of our 
wonderful Fair, any hostess who would attempt a tea would run 
the risk of finding herself decidedly left. Hence the probabilities 
are that parties will be made up to witness the parade, as it passes 
along the streets, from different locales; and these in a measure 
take the place of gatherings at one's own houses. 

San Rafael seems determined to keep its end up, notwithstand- 
ing flood, rain and tempest. Each week one hears of some new 
entertainment over there, designed for the pleasure of its resi- 
dents and their friends from town. The latest, which was also 
the most successful, of the season so far, was the affair given in 
honor of the Fortnightly Club by Mrs. Lichtenburg last week, at 
her handsome San Rafael home. The Fortnightly is a collection 
chiefly of bright musical people around Ross Valley and San 
Rafael, got up about three years ago by Mrs. Hall McAllister, Sr., 
and others, and every two weeks a programme, which had to be 
original, has been executed at one house or the other of the club — 
sometimes very unique. Mrs. Lichtenburg's gathering was to 
give pleasure to the club. The triumph of the evening was the 
grand tableaux of the History of Music, representing the differ- 
ent stages in the progressive ages, with appropriate selections of 
music with each. It is unnecessary to say the music was excel- 
lent, for Edgar S. Kelly and his wife had full charge of tbat part 
of the affair. The pictures were also excellent and drew forth 
enthusiastic applause. Miss Bradford, representing the Grecian 
epoch, was especially effective. Mrs. Evens, Miss Feebler and 
the Misses Lichtenburg also gave efficient aid. After the tableaux 
came the ever-favorite Kinder Symphony, conducted by Edgar 
Kelly. The elite of San Rafael performed on the toy instru- 
ments, Mrs. Carter Pomeroy's achievement on the trumpet call- 
ing forth shouts of merriment and appreciation. At the conclu- 
sion of the symphony refreshments were served, followed by 
dancing, and altogether the evening was one of continued enjoy- 
ment. Among the guests were the English Consul and family, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Pomeroy, Mrs. Montague Hankin, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. H. Morrow, etc. 



The second of the Fleishman-Landsberger concerts will take 
place at Golden Gate Hall Thursday evening, February 8tb, in- 
stead of Wednesday, the former day being the opening of Lent. 
An unusually interesting programme has been arranged. 

Awarded Highest Honors World's Fair. 



D* PRICE'S 




Baking 
Powder 



The only Pure Cream of tartar Powder.— No ammonia ; No Alnm 
Used in Millions of Homes — 10 years the Standard 



Jan. 27, 1894. 



s\\ I i;\\< BOO NEWS LETT! K. 



28 



The latt «oclelv «veni to Uke plac* t( the (Irand Opera HoaM 
will b« Ibe third concert t>f the Saturday Morning Orchestra, 
under the direction of Mr J. H. Rouwtld. Monday evening, the 
Alb pr.>x.. in aid of the PiooMf K iilrrgarlen and the Ohlldnn'fl 
Ul. The orchestra wilt he tulltod by the 8an Kranciaro 
QU* Olob, Miss Annie I. vie and Mr. Andrew Hoeart. and a good 
programme has been arranged. The Saturday Morning Orchestra 
i« oompOMd largely of the -anu' young ladies who gave 90 phe- 
Domenalty successful concerts in 1892 in aid of various chanties. 
Tbelr numbers have been increased, and good progress in their 
art has been made. The Ban Francisco Glee Club is an organiza- 
tion of nin*» young ladies who are gifted with excellent voices. 
In giving Mr Uogarl a place on the programme the young ladies 
taav« departed from their old ruie of having only ladies to take 
part. Mr. lioeart, though ouly eighteen years of age, has a bari- 
tona voltn of tine quality and excellent finish. This will be bis 
first appearance before an audience in tbe city of his birth, edu- 
cation and rearing, and those who have heard him sing predict 
that he will take foremost rank among tbe great singers. One of 
the young ladies of tbe orchestra. Miss Anne Lyle, will give a 
Bute solo. 

reparations are now going on for an entertainment to be 
given in Easter week for the benefit of the Helping HanJ Kinder- 
garten Society. Tbe society numbers about thirty young ladies, 
who support three free schools, at an expense of about fifteen 
hundred dollars a year. From various causes the treasury has 
been running down, until almost the last dollar is reached. One 
of two courses confronted the members — to relinquish tbe work 
and turn their kindergarten children into the street, or make a 
mighty effort and refill the empty box. With characteristic 
energy the young ladies decided promptly on the latter course. 
The entertainment, to be given at one of the theatres, will take 
the form of a musical fantasy, under the name of a "Midwinter 
Wedding." Solly Walter is stage manager and general director; 
Donald de V. Graham has charge of the songs and choruses; and 
"Connie" Gerichten will look after the libretto and music. With 
three such managers the affair is bound to be successful. A very 
clever advertising scheme is worked up in the production, the 
advertisers being represented in a very novel and uuique manner. 
A more detailed account will be given later on. 



The first concert of the Alhambra Bandurria Club and Las Gui- 
tarriatas will be given at Golden Gate Hall, 625 Sutter St., Thurs- 
day evening. February 1st. It will be under the direction of 
Professor J. Sancho, Professor J. Lombardero, assisted by Miss M. 
P. Kuner (mezzo-3oprano,) Sefior Rtnaldo Kebagliati (violinist), 
and Mr. Frank Coffin (tenor). The club is composed of well- 
known San Franciscans, who have acquired remarkable profi- 
ciency as performers on Spanish instruments. The bandurria 
players are Prof. Lombardero, Miss Josephine Blair, George A. 
James, Miss Elsie Liebes, Miss Leoni Liebes, W. J. McLean, F. 
Parks and Miss Hattie N. Rood; mandolin — Misses Emily Horst- 
man, May S. Mugan and Martha Wood; guitar — Prof. Joae San- 
cho, Misses Susie M. Blair, Marie L. Deal, Ellen Hawkinson and 
M. P. Kuner, Mrs. A. L. Whitney and Frank H. Vaalit; cello, 
Charles Kuss; violin, R. B. Howe. The Guitaristas are Prof. 
Sancho, Misses Blair, Deal, Edna Cotrel, Dorothy Cotterill, Ellen 
Hawkinson and Blanche Letcher, Mrs. Whitney and Mr. Vaslit. 
The programme is highly attractive. Tickets are on sale at Sher- 
man & Clay'a. 

"Thimble bees " are one of the projects proposed for Lenten 
diversOD, and should our maids and matrons take kindly to it 
there appears to be no reason why not only a great deal of pleas- 
ure but a great deal of profit might not result. Each lady does a 
dainty piece of fancy work, or even plain sewing, on the occasion 
of the weekly meeting. Music and readings are given by those 
not so occupied, and there are light refreshments. At the end of 
Lent the articles made are to be sold for the benefit of the poor. 



The fifth and last party before the Lenten season was given by the 
members of the the Ladies' Club of "93, last Thursday evening, the 
25th inst., at the residence of Miss Virginia Stump, 1424 McAllister 
street. The early part of the evening was devoted to a musicale, and 
then there was dancing to the music of a splendid orchestra. Among 
those who assisted were Mrs. Irwin C. Stump, Mrs. J. L. Bradbury, 
Mrs. W. V. Bryan, Miss Behlow, Miss McLaine. Miss Taylor and 
Miss Smith. 

ALL picture frames and framed pictures are made with nice or- 
namented corners at a small expense, adding much to the 
style and beauty of the frames. Finished in any color desired. 
Paints, brushes, canvasses, plaques, panels, studies and every- 
thing else required to paint with and paint on. Writing paper 
and stationery of every description for either office or home use. 
Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741, 743, 745 Market street. 



Abell & Priest, the photographers, 131 Post street, have the 
most spacious and elegant gallery on the Coast. Their facilities for 
group and club work are unequaled. A specialty made of college 
class work. The photo parlors lately arranged for this firm are com- 
plete, and without doubt the finest in the State. Their work is un- 
excelled, if equaled, on the coast. Give them a call and be convinced. 



TBE ooDvploaoQi •xoellenoi of tb« Obriitmu number ol 7V 
TntmUr, an Illustrated monthly journal ol travt-l and i. 
Hon published In ifalsclty, ha* drawn wide attention to a pnblli 
which, though It la not two yeei ol6Maai knowledged lobe the 
arUatio produol ol tl ■ ountry. 



Fashion decrees thiit n palm in nn Indispensable article of parlor 
decoration. It gives a tone <>[ tropical softness thai nothing el 
secure, it* dark green combining with almost any ol tbe warmer 
colors. There i- a pre 't variety o! palm* suitable f<>r this purpose. 
John If. Slevers, al 25 Posi street, makes a specialty of these plants, 
keeping a largo variety, which embraces every desirable kind. Their 
beauty is greatly enhanced by the care which he takes In rearing 
them, and purchasers may feel assured that palms from him will 
retain that rich, soft coloring which denotes health and vigor. 

People who are fond of good oysters are generally honest in busi- 
ness, and that is why the oysters sold at Moravian's oyster stalls, (13 
to 67 California Market, are so populnr with good peopie. 



The Marked Success 

of Scott's Emulsion in consump- 
tion, scrofula and other forms of 
hereditary disease is due to its 
powerful food properties. 

Scott's Emulsion 

rapidly creates healthy flesh — 
proper weight. Hereditary 
taints develop only when the 
system becomes weakened. 



Nothing in the world 
of medicine has been 
so S2iccessful in dis- 
eases that are most 
menacing to life. Phy- 
sicians everywhere 
prescribe it. 



Prpp.'ired by Snntt A Bnwno, N. Y. All dmpcists. 



REMOVAL NOTICE. 

The General Agency of the 

TRAVELERS' INSURANCE CO. 

HAS BEEN REMOVED TO 

KOOMS 21, 22, 23, 24, (eighth floor.) 
MILLS BUILDING. 

ajtyAgnor, W. W. HASKELL < M c *S£ t 

Plumbing, Drainage and Gas fitting in the latest 
and most improved method. Fine Sanitary 
Goods. Suggettions for plumbing improve- 
ments furnished upon application. 

Repairing of all kinds promptly attended to. 
Per&oual supervision over all work. Estimates 
given and repairing done in any part of the 
city or STATE. 

Charles E. Anderson, 

1G1G Polk, near flay. Telephone 2107. 

Branch, 1214 Polk, nr, Sutter, Tel. 2107-2 S. P. 



SANITARY 
PLUMBING. 




UNION GAS AND 
GASOLINE ENGINES. 

1600 IN USE. 

For LAUNCHES, 
PRINTING OFFICES 
PUMPING 

And all purposes where power is required. 

UNION GAS ENGINE CO. 

221-223 First St., S. F. 
Send for Catalogue. 



24 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 27, 1894. 




VI60R * MEN 

Easily, Quickly, Permanently Restored. 

Weakness, Nervousness, 
Debility, and all the train 
of evils from early errors or 
later excesses, the results of 
overwork, sickness, worry, 
etc. Full strength, devel- 
opment and tone given to 
every organ and portion 
ofthebody. Simple,nat- 
ural methods. Immedi- 
ate improvement seen, 
failure impossible. 2,000 references. Book, 
explanation and proofs mailed (sealed) free. 

ERIE MEDICAL CO., Buffalo, N.V. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trams Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO : 

Leave] From Jan. 74. 1894. I Arbive 

7:00 a Atlantic Express. Ogdea and East 6:45a 

7:00 a Benicia, Vacaville, $Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento and Redding via Davis. . 7:15 P 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Napa, Calis- 

toga and *Santa Rosa 6 :15 p 

8:30 A Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, 'Oroville, 
and Red Bluff 4:15 P 

9:00 a New Orleans Express, Santa Bar- 
bara, Los Angeles, Doming, El 

Paso, New Orleans and East 8:45 p 

*9:00 a Stockton and Milton *8:45p 

110:00 A Haywards, Niles and San Jose.. . 16:15 p 
*12 :00 M Haywards, Niles and San Jose ... *6 :15 p 
*1:00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00 p 

4:00p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano, and 
SantaRosa 9:15a. 

4:00 p. Benicia, Vacaville, Esparto, 
$$Rnmsey, Woodland, Knight's 
Landing, Marysville, Oroville 
and Sacramento 10 :45a 

4:30 p. Niles, Livermore and San Jo^e. 8:45 a 

5:00 p. Martinez, Stockton, Modesto, Mer- 
ced and Fresno -. 10:45a 

5:00p. Los Angeles ExpresB, Fresno, 
Bakersfield, Santa Barbara and 
Lob Angeles 10:15a. 

5:00 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mojave and East 10:45 a. 

6:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East. . 9:45a 

6:00 p. Haywards, NileB and San Jose.. 7:45 a. 

17:00p. Vallejo +8:45 p. 

7:00 p. Oregon Express. Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and E ast. .. 10:4 S A 

Santa Cruz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

8;15a. Newark. Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 6:20 p. 

*2:15 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New 
Almaden, Felton, Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 

stations *11:50a 

4:15 p. Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos. 9:50 a. 

+11:45 p. Hunters' Train for Newark, Al- 
viso, San Jose, Los Gatos and way 

stations j7:2Qp 

Coast Division (Third a idTownsend Streets ). 
6:45 a. San Jose, New Almaden and Way 

Stations 2:45 P. 

8:15 a. San Jose, TresPinoB, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
San Luis Obispo and principal 

WayStations 6:26p. 

10:40a. San Jose, and Way Stations... 5:06p. 

12:25 p. Palo Alto and Wav Stations.. 4:15 P. 
*2:20p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 

Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, I 

PacificGrove *10:40a. 

*3:30 p. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions.. 9:47 A. 

*4:25p. Palo Alto and Way Stations.. *8:06a. 

5:10 p. San Jose and Way Stations *8:48a. 

6:30p. Palo Alto and Way Stations. 6:35a. 

+11:45 p. Palo Alto and principal Way 
Stations... +7:26 p. 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

FromSW FRASH SCO— Foot of Market St. (Slip 8)— 
*7 00 *S 00 9 0") *L0 OOaud 11 00 a. m., *12 30 
11 CO *2 00 3 00 *4 00 5 00 and *d 00 p m 

From OIKIiAXD— Foot of Broadway. 

*6 00 *7 00 8 00 *9 00 10 00 and Ml 00 a. m. 
112 00 *12 30 2 00 *3 00 4 00 and "5 00 p. M. 

A. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. +Saturdays only. 

tSundayponly. 
{Monday, Wednesday and Friday only. 
(, ft j Going— Saturday and Sunday only. 
u I Returning— Sunda y am i Mond ay only. 

The PACIFIC TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other information. 



A GREAT PARISIAN HOAX. 

iN 1890 an advertisement appeared stat- 
ing that a deceased Russian princess 
left a million fraDes to be given to the per- 
son who would remain one year and a day 
in the little cbapel over her tomb in Pere 
La Chaise and watch ber body, which was 
in a glass coffin. The watcher should see 
nobody during tbe time he or she remained 
in the castle, and should not even speak 
to the servant that would be employed to 
supply tbe refreshments. Candidates were 
politely requested to communicate with 
the superintendant of the cemetery. That 
unfortunate functionary soon found him- 
self deluged with letters from fools in all 
parts of tbe world. Paragraphs began 
to appear in the papers stating that several 
intrepid watchers had already abandoned 
the task on account of the uneasiness of 
the dead princess. In other words, she 
has a disagreeable habit of getting out of 
her glass coffin, and walking about in her 
shroud. It is almost too bad to clip tbe 
wings of a canvasback canard that flew so 
long and so far. But it has turned out, 
just in time to save the superintendent, of 
Pere La Chaise from going crazy, that the 
Russian princess, the little glass coffin, 
and the generous bequest never existed, 
and that the tomb which was supposed to 
contain berinterestine and restless remains 
really belongs to a French family named 
De Beaujour. 




TRAMP— Say, boss, don't yer want ter 
hire a man? Farmer— Wal, I dunno; 
I s'pose I might use you as a scarecrow. 
Tramp— Thank yer, boss. That's the first 
encouraging word I've had since money 
went up ter a premium in New York. 

— Boston Transcript. 

Wooc bin's Facial Soap 

For tbe Sfcin, Scalp and Com- 

i plexlon. The result of uO 

[years' practical experience in 

(dermatology. For sole by all 

I Druggists. Send 10c for a 

HSamplo Size Cake and 150 

/page Book on Dermatology and 

Beauty, Illustrated; on Skin. 

Scalp. Nervous uii'l B'.ood DIs* 

ei^es.Bin h Marks. Moles, Warts, 

Plmp:es, Freckles, Superfluous 

Hair, t»v\ r> l Pkfn ' lemtshes. 

JOHN H. WOODBURY, Dermatologist, 

125 U. 42nd »t., N-V. Coubuliailou free. 

Indispensable in 
Every good Kitchen. 

As every good housewife knows, 
the difference between appetiz- 
ing, delicious cooking and the 
opposite kind is largely in deli- 
cate sauces and palatable gra- 
vies. Now, these require a 
strong, delicately flavored stock, 
and the best stock is 

Liebig Company's 
Extract of Beef 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN 
NAN STREETS, at 3: 00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with SteamerBfor SHANGHAI: 

Gaelic Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1894 

Belgic Thursday, Feb. 8, 1894 

Oc«ANic(via Honolulu) ..Tuesday. Feb 27,1894 
Gaelic Tuesday, March 20, 1894 

ROUND TRIP TICKET8 AT REDUCED RATE8 
CabiD flans on exhibition and Passage 
■rlckatB for sale at S. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
streets. San Francisco. 

For freight apply at offices of Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company, at wharf, or at No. 202 
Front street, San Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gcn.Pass.Agt. 



For Clubs 
and HotelSo 

j No wine room or any first-class ho- S 
i tel, club, cafe, or gentleman's cellar ( 
I is complete without this valuable ad- ( 
1 junct. Served on the side and at 5 
i afternoon and evening entertainments \ 
and receptions, hot or iced. 



flT^™ 



CLAM 



MUM 



| It is now recognized as Indispensable j 
, in all well-regulated establishments. [ 

i Sold by leading Grocers and Wine Merchants. < 
i Put up only in glass. Pints, $6.00 per dozen. ( 
I Order from your dealer or direct. Discounts ( 
) ti^the trade. 
' E. S. Burnham Co., i2oGanesvoort"St.,N. Y. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 

Oal'Ing at various ports of Mexico and Central 

America. 

SAILINGS— At noon. 

S. S. " San JuaD," January 29, 1894. 

S. S. "San Bias," February 8, 1894. 

8. S. "Colima," February 19, 1894. 

8.3. "San Jose," February 28, 1994. 

Note.— When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA 

AND HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc. : 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

S. S. "China," via Honolulu, Tuesday, January 

30, 1894, at 3 P. M. 

S. S. '-Peru," Saturday, February 17, 1894, at 
3 P. M. 

S.S. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Thur&day, March 
8, 1894, at 3 p. M. 

S. 8. "City of Peking," Thursday, March 
29, 1894, at 3 p. M. 
Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 
202 Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 
General Agent 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch Bteamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a. m., Jan. 10,25; Feb. 9, 24; 
March 11, 26; j\pril and May, 10, 25. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
Jan. 5th, and every 5th day thereafter. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Augeles, (Santa Monica,) 
Redondo, (Los Angeles), and Newport, every 
fourth and fifth day, at 11 a. m. 

For portB in Mexico, 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOOPALL, PERKINS A CO., Gen '1 Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The splendid 3,000 

tou steamers of the 

•cv Oceanic Steamship Co. 

"°. sail for HONOLULU, 

\CL AUCKLAND and SYD- 

\° NEY as under: 

For HONOLULU, 
APIA. AUCKLAND 
and SYDNEY, S. S. 
"MONOWAI," Feb. 
8lh, 2 p. M. 
For HONOLULU, 
S. 8. •' AUSTRALIA," 
Feb. 17, 1894. 
For passage apply to 138 Montgomery Street. 
For freight apply to 327 Market Street. 
J. D. SPKECKELo & HK03. CO., Qeneral Agts. 




SfiVETJ 



Pri ca par Copy, 10 Cinu. 



Annual Subaortptton, »*00. 




Newsletter 




Ko/. xm// 



S/ltf FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY ::, IS 94. 



Number 5. 



Printtd and Published nery Saturday by the Proprietor, Knr.n 
.Marriott, 606-609-613 Merchant Street, San Francisco. En- 
tered at San Francisco Post-office at Second Class Matter. 



The office of the News Letter in Nat Tork City is at the « Evening 
Post " Building, 204-206 Broadway, Room 1. trhcrc information 
may be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 



Communications intended for publication should be in the hands of the 
editor by noon of Thursday. 



TALM AGE bas resigned from ihe pulpit in New York, and now 
London is making a bid for him. Has Donnybrook nothing 
lo »ay? 

IT is now quite evident that JlcWhirter committed suicide, was 
murdered, and shot himself accidentally. Mr. Clerk, call the 
next case. 



ANEW French explosive has been tested and found to be 
stronger than dynamite. Of course the anarchists will lay in 
a new supply. 

A REPORTER for the Los Angeles Herald disguised himself as 
a tramp, and met with the usual experience. He was 
taken for the editor. 



IN Chicago, the other day, a criminal was hanged twice, but 
here in San Francisco a murderer cannot get hanged even 
once. Chicago might well be imitated in other matters besides 
fairs. 



"I 



NEVER meant it!" choleric William aaid ; 

"No more did I!" exclaimed the crafty Bizzy; 
Immortal Truth, dumbfounded, turned and fled 
At such a pace it made the nations dizzy. 



THE unemployed are still with us, and their needs are as great 
as ever. Hundreds of men have secured work in the Park, 
and now that we have cared for them, we must not forget the 
hundreds who are starving by the wayside. There is plenty of 
idle money in this city, and it should be put out, and then, 
starvation is not an agreeable exhibit for the Midwinter Fair. 



GENERAL ALGER, who wants to be President of the Qnited 
States, declares that he began life as a barefooted boy. The 
General ia on the right path, and when he showed his good 
sense and came into the world unshod, be fully demonstrated his 
wonderful capacity for the office of President. Had he been born 
with a pair of hob-nailed shoes, he could never have aspired to 
such honors. But we are afraid that had he made his start in the 
world as a barefooted girl, he could never have been more than a 
sister to the President. 



THE report comes from Germany that Great Britain, France, 
Germany and the United States are likely to enter into a 
monetary union at an early date, for the purpose of putting 
silver on its feet again. This is important, if true. However, 
the action taken by India and the United States against silver in 
1893 is leading to a condition which will probably compel the 
great nations of Europe to do something toward increasing the 
employment of that metal in the coinage, and of bracing up the 
market. When Europe gets ready to move in the matter, the 
United States will lend a helping hand. 



THE woman with the cowhide is becoming uncomfortably 
numerous and active in these days. The latest was heard 
from at Cripple Creek, Colo., where ahe beat a man until the 
blood flowed. Man is practically powerless against enraged 
woman with a cowhide. There is a peculiar association of dis- 
grace with a borse-whrpping. A sensitive man would prefer be- 
ing knocked down, pummelled, run over, or even shot, to the 
slightest stinging from the horse-whip. The stigma of the latter 
can be wiped out only by a return in kind with good interest, but 
that sort of a return a man cannot make to a woman. When a 
strong man receives the severe and unexpected sting of the whip- 
stroke, it is the most painful of the reminders that show him 
how helpless he is, in many caaes, against weak woman. 



A STANFORD i niveralty student has committed suicide. It ia 
believed that his reason was dethroned in a vain attempt to 
reconcile President Jordan's pronounced convictions on evolution 
with the same gentleman's extreme reverence for the first chapter 
of Genesis. 



THE Khedive, buckling up his belt another hole to make less 
conspicuous his amplitude, protrusive with a surfeit of 
humble pie, hastens graciously to make known his affectionate 
approval of the British army, to which he is as rootedly attached 
as a tail to the dog that waga it. And Lord Chromer, aolemnly 
patting him on the back, aoothingly whiapera: "Good boy, 
Khedive; you recited that little piece I wrote for you almost as 
well aa 1 could have done it myself I" 



COLORADO is always to the fore as the butt of ridicule of the 
United States. At a meeting of the State Legislature last 
week, one of the Senators openly declared that a fellow Senator 
had never earned an honest dollar in bis life. The assailed 
Senator responded that unless his co-worker retracts the state- 
ment be will beat his brains out with a club. So it is quite pos- 
sible that the Colorado Legislature will learn whether or not one 
of its members really has any braina. 



THE Princess of Wales has become hopelessly insane." — Press 
Despatch. 

And thou, too, gpntle Princess, patient, mild, 
Thou type of perfect womanhood, beguiled 
By fifty years of pageantry to glance 
From thy high place of old historic chance 
Far down upon a base-born world! At last 
An iron hand hath crushed thee; so all paat 
la thy divinity of right by birth, 
And thus thou standest, poorest of the earth. 
Ah, well! the memories of all men dwell 
On the sweet light which shone ere darkness fell. 
And now that thy poor head ia stricken low, 
Beata not a heart that hath not felt the blow. 



IT is interesting to observe that so eminent a man as Dvorak, a 
foreigner, should have come to America and discovered the 
fact that wonderful music resides in the negro's throat. It haa 
really been known to Americans for centuries, but what great 
American musician or musical instructor has taken notice of the 
fact? While the scientists may be right in declaring that the 
sutures in a young negro's skull knit at a much earlier age than 
in the Anglo-Saxon race, and that therefore the growth and de- 
velopment of the brain are arrested earlier, intellect has com- 
paratively little concern with the quality of the voice and the 
ability to sing. It is not at all unlikely that oat of Dvorak's en- 
thusiasm will grow a fashion for negro singers, and that out of 
the fashion will rise voices which will ring throughout Christen- 
dom. We might have known, without the aid of a Dvorakan 
intelligence, that of all the gifts which nature has bestowed upon 
mankind, that of song to the negro places him preeminently 
above all the other races of men. 



THE real reason that the steamship Miowera ia to be sent to 
England for repairs is, not because the local tenders were ex- 
cessive, but that the steamer is to be lengthened by some forty 
feet, which will give the vessel about five hundred tons more 
measurement. This spece will be utilized for the carrying of 
frozen meat and fish, and refrigerating machinery will be fitted. 
The Canadians are making big bids for the Australian trade, and 
arrangements have been made for placing Australian meat on the 
Canadian market, and for sending British Columbia fish to Aus- 
tralia. The vessel will go to England without any repairs to her 
damaged bottom, and on arrival at Newcastle-on-Tyne will be cut 
in two and lengthened by her builders, Messrs. Swan and Hunter, 
who are also large shareholders in the ship. The owners have 
accepted a sum of money in satisfaction of all claims for insur- 
ance, and the steamer will go to Europe uninsured and at the 
owners' risk, unleaa they can cover her by new insurances, she 
being unclassed and not seaworthy according to Lloyd's rules. Of 
course, the Miowera would not be allowed to carry any passengers 
or cargo, but will take in enough coal at Vancouver Island to 
last the voyage. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 3, 1894; 



THE BANISHMENT OF CUPID. 



STANDING far above all other social problems in America (and 
to a considerable extent in England alao) is the decline of 
marriage. Falling in love has become a lost art, and students of 
sociology are casting about to discover the cause and suggest a 
remedy. So far as we are concerned, we do not agree with those 
sociologists who regard this condition of things as an evil, nor, in 
our opinion, is it difficult to discover the cause; hence we would 
not suggest a remedy. It is interesting, however, to analyze the 
situation and speculate upon iis outcome. While it is the women 
from whom this Macedonean cry is coming, it may be cheering to 
them to reflect that they themselves are the most important 
factor in an extraordinary evolution, which gives promise of 
producing, in America at least, within the next hundred years, a 
social condition in contemplation of which all continental Europe 
will stand aghast. What, after all, are the "decline of marriage," 
the loss of "the art of falling in love," and the half-accepted 
aphorism that "marriage is a failure" — what are these but the 
expression of an educated instinct which is antagonistic to them? 
If women, by individual and organized endeavor to "emanci- 
pate" themselves and take a place side by side with men in the 
struggle for existence, are not giving substance to a divine in- 
stinct within them which rebels against the bondage of matri- 
mony, then the voice of God is not recognized when it is heard. 
With freedom comes iconoclasm, the breaking of those chains 
with which the hoary lares et penales of other times and condi- 
tions have bound us. Nurtured by the spirit of the people and 
their laws, the sense of freedom in the American heart is large 
and aspiring, and it dares more and more to compare the will of 
nature with the customs and traditions of the people. And it is 
to the gentle hearts of women that this still, small voice of free- 
dom sings with alluring sweetness. 

What is love but romance, and in whose hearts except those of 
youth is wholesome romance possible? But this is not the age of 
romance. Can it, then, be an age of love and early marriage? It 
is a utilitarian age. The scientist has supplanted the school- 
master of the people, and is sweeping religion and other traditions 
from the field. Even in literature realism is seeking to throttle 
romance. In the old 8outh, slavery, the duello, romance and 
early marriage were vitally inseparable; with the overthrow of 
slavery the others were struck to the ground. In short, chivalry, 
with all that it means — the strict accountability of man to man, 
without an appeal to the law; the cultivation, among men, of a 
spirit of absolute self-reliance, regulated by an inflexible public 
sentiment which punished wrong-doing with the sword or social 
ostracism; the cherishing by the men of modesty and virtue in 
the women ; their adoration of the women, their tender, affection- 
ate and respectful care of them — under what conditions could 
romantic love, early marriage, domestic peace, confidence and 
sweetness, and refinement and gentleness among the women, 
have been more surely accomplished? But slavery fell, and with 
it chivalry; and the emancipation of the slaves in the South 
struck the shackles from all the women in America. For thereby 
was patriarcbism destroyed and cosmopolitanism erected in its 
stead. Man is no longer the custus morum for woman. Discov- 
ering at last the real pusillanimity of man when he is stripped of 
the glory with which his patriarchal robe invested him, and real- 
izing at last that God has given her the right and the oppor- 
tunity to exercise her individuality — to construct a code of 
morals for her own conduct, and to decide for herself whether or 
not a passive and unquestioning submission to the assignment 
which man has made for her — woman has taken matters into her 
own hands, and is determined to ascertain for herself whether 
they rightly correspond with the heaven-given instinct within 
her. She is abandoning the old standard and erecting one of her 
own; and who dares to question her natural right so to do? It 
is incredible to her that by nature "man is a polygamist and 
woman a monogamist," and she regards as the specious plea of a 
rou6 the aphorism that "what is folly in a man is crime in a 
woman." 

Suppose that all this does help the tendency toward the de- 
struction of romance, the loss of the art of falling in love, the 
abolition of early marriage, the weakening of the marriage bond, 
and the lessening of the number of births; who can say that it is 
not right and best? The more that men seek to throw discredit 
on the "women's movement," the more they disclose their own 
vanity and a resentment that their pusillanimity has been at last 
discovered. The dethroned tyrant always is pusillanimous. 

To what lengths this shattering of idols and erection of new 
standards will go it is impossible to foresee. Likely it will be 
overdone, as all reformations are; but out of it all will come 
light and truth. Like all scourges — take cholera, for instance — 
it will purge society of the weak and the vicious; and although 
by so doing it will break many a heart, of what moment is that 
when the strong and the upright shall remain to work out the 
will of Providence? 

TAX-COLLECTOR James W. Block is angry at the city because 
he is a°ked to collect $2,000,000, aided by five deputies. We 
wonder how many men there are who would not like to collect 
that amount single-handed and alone just now. 



BETTER REDUCE THE CHARGE. 



FROM the 1st till the 27th of January the charge for admission 
to the Midwinter Fair was twenty-five cents. Since the 27tb, 
when the formal opening occurred, the admission fee has been 
fifty cents, and apparently the increase has had a bad effect. 
Making all allowance for the incompleteness of everything, and 
for the fact that likely a majority of the people attended on 
the dedication exercises, the very small attendance which has 
been seen this week, when the weather was so delightful, must 
be taken to mean something. It has been so much smaller than 
that which preceded the doubling of the admission fee, that there 
is reason to wonder what it means, especially when it is reflected 
that since the formal opening the fair has been so much belter 
than it was before. Fifty cents was the charge of admission to 
the Columbian Exposition, but that was a very much larger 
fair and Chicago is the greatest railroad center in the country. 
Many of the concessionaires at the Midwinter Fair pay for their 
privileges a fourth of their gross receipts. It is clear that the 
larger the attendance the larger the receipts of the concessionaires, 
and hence an increase of the income of the F'air managers from 
that source. The simple problem, then, is this: Would the man- 
agers, by reducing the general admission charge to twenty-live 
cents, get larger receipts throngh the increased attendance upon 
private shows than they would by maintaining the present 
charge of fifty cents? Apart from the financial aspect of the case, 
which appears to favor a reduction to twenty-five cents, is the 
consideration that the lower charge would permit a larger number 
of persons to enjoy the fair, and to that extent the reduction would 
be a benefit to the city and State, which would be altogether inde- 
pendent of present financial concerns. More than that, if one 
visit all the private shows one cannot expect to spend less than 
$12, and hence any particular expenditure — especially the initia- 
tory one, if it appear large — will have a deterrent effect upon the 
attendance. The business men of San Francisco have been prin- 
cipally the ones who have furnished the money which made the 
fair possible. They are interested in seeing as many people as 
possible induced to visit the fair from the country. At present 
they are not in a pleasant frame of mind over the effect which 
the increase of the admission fee has had, for they believe that, 
trivial as it may seem, it is keeping and will continue to keep 
many country people from visiting the city. Taking into account 
the fact that although for the four great Fair buildings no 
separate admission fee is charged, it is nevertheless true that 
these same builaings are filled with pestiferous hawkers, who en- 
deavor to make all visitors stand and deliver, and that whatever 
freedom of access is given to these buildings is nullified by the 
insistent cadging of these hucksters, who pay the managers 
handsomely for the privilege which they enjoy to the discomfort 
and impoverishment of the visitors, it does teem to the contribu- 
tors to the fair fund that a charge of fifty cents, with this serious 
drawback attached to it, is too great in proportion to the com- 
forts and benefits enjoyed. We would respectfully inquire, 
therefore, what conspicuous rights are enjoyed ar.d what superior 
benefits will accrue from the charge of an admission fee of fifty 
cents. If these are inadequate, then the charge should be reduced 
to twenty-five cents. 



MR. STEAD'S GHOST. 



WILLIAM T. STEAD, the editor of the Review of Reviews, re- 
cently startled Chicago by delivering a ser.es of strict lec- 
tures on the moral and social status of theplace. The other day, 
in the same city, he told a most remarkable story. He said that 
he was a spiritualistic medium and had communications with the 
spirit of the late Miss Julia Ames, editor of the Union Sijnal. 
Whatever the people may think of the credibility tf Mr. Stead's 
statement, it is wonderful. After all, these few thousand cubic 
miles of matter floating about a small sun far away in an Insig- 
nificant and thinly starred part of the universe may not contain 
all the laws of force and life and consciousness. Spirits may 
walk and write, and people may see them. It is, as any 
student of physics knows, much easier to believe in the re- 
currence of the sheeted dead than to give credence to the idea 
that matter, as we know it, can exist at a temperature of 300 
degrees below the freezing point of water. We can wave a wire 
before an electro-magnet and drag out of their bed in the ether, 
vibrations that defy every law of our experience. When Mr. 
Stead claims that a ghost has used his band to write, he pledges 
his word to a very wonderful and a truly remarkable fact — a fact 
that, coming from Mr. Siead, we are prone to believe. The age 
of miracles is still with us. It may sound a bit preposterous, but 
it is a fact that when we come up to ihe end of our oasis of 
natural law and human experience, we find it shading off into the 
unthinkable unknown, which defies the most subtle theories of 
philosophy. 

JUSTICE BREWSTER'S allusion, at the Yale alumni dinner, to 
"Mrs. Hayes' husband" and Balaam's ass, reminds us that 
though Balaam is dead, his ass still survives. And at the Yale 
banquet he opened his mouth and spake. 



'. 1894. 



SAN FR VN< 1- NEWS I ETTER, 






THE OPENING OF THE MIDWINTER FAIR- 



LaVST Saturday the boHdlng \ lion I V Iwinler Fair 

were formally *• dedicated " t » the o?e» intended for them. 
The ceremonies were of the customary fashion, and need not here 
be described particularly — there wai ft great parade of military 
and civic bodies, speeches were made by various persons, ft 
gracious woman touched an electric button which was presumed 
to atftrt machinery somewhere, cannoo boomed, llan." were un- 
furled, the blaring of brass band? rent the air, and in the evening 
there were glorious fireworks. 1 1 was the story of all " openings." 
*• inaugurations " and "dedications." expanded to fit An even! of 
uncommon magnitude. The daily papers having consumed all 
possible big adjectives to describe it. we are powerless to rind an- 
other, and helpless to depict the enthusiasm of the people. It re- 
mains, therefore, only for us to say a word about the fair itself- - 
what it means, what its dimensions, proportions, perspective and 
side lights are. and how best it may be seen. 

There is one sufficient reason why it is better than the Chicago 
fair — it is not so big, and hence it will not produce so large a crop 
of foolish visitors. To see as little of the Chicago fair as possible 
was to understand it best; the opposite condition holds good 
here. In all things there is a golden mean; it is fortunate that 
sometimes, in spite of the American — particularly the Western — 
tendency to produce monsters, we are compelled to be rational. 
At Chicago there were walled sheds of inconceivable vastness. 
They were built and arranged on tbe rectangular principle, as 
though Hogartb in form and Vandyke in color had never lived. 
TheChicago bouses were called the « White City," because the 
vast buildings were all white; and thus, glittering in the burning 
bud. they ate out the eyes of the beholders. Here the houses and 
the show are not so vast, and hence they are comprehensible; 
belter than that, the touch of color which has been given them is 
indescribably beautiful; still better, the half-tropical character 
of the local climate has been accepted, not only for novel and 
striking arboreal effects impossible in any other part of the 
United States, but also for the introduction of an Oriental luxu- 
riance in architecture, color and arrangement. All this means 
to say that the impression created by the externals of the Mid- 
winter Fair is strangely restful. A sweet, soft, languorous pic- 
ture this grouping of form and color makes, perfectly suited to 
the softness, gentleness and winsoraeness of this strange, beauti- 
ful and alluring place. Nothing like it would be possible in any 
other city of America. In this harmonizing of nature and art, tbe 
managers of tbe Midwinter Fair have created a work which, for 
fine understanding and artistic effect, the world has not seen 
heretofore. 

8o much for the externals. Within the great buildings one sees 
the regulation fair, amplified prodigiously, but not bewilderingly. 
Everything can be seen, studied and understood. Larger artistic 
effects in arrangement, grouping and setting than are familiar to 
those who did not see Philadelphia or Chicago are here observ- 
able, and that is something. The best of everything that indus- 
try has produced has been put on exhibition, and that means a 
tremendous investment and a corresponding gorgeousness of 
show. Hardly more need be said of the main buildings which 
house the "liberal arts" {a queer conventional term !), the manufac- 
turing and agriculture, except to say that a very grievous 
plague exists throughout them in the form of persons (generally 
foreigners) who industriously and savagely offer their wares for 
sale. They are an insufferable nuisance. Not only do they de- 
tract much from the pleasure of a quiet stroll through the build- 
ings, but they so thoroughly disgust and alarm sightseers that 
those exhibitors who give away chocolate, coffee, tea and other 
pleasant little things to advertise their business, are passed over 
by the visitors and classed among the clamoring highwaymen who 
cry their wares for sale. The advertisers who give away things 
will have the support of the public if they demand that the 
pestiferous hawkers be made to keep their mouths shut and de- 
cently await purchasers. It is not alone in the buildings that 
these pests abound ; they infest the highways and the grounds of 
tbe concessionaires, and those of them who happen to be clad 
woroanwise are the most offensive of all. One might slap a ma'e 
ruffian in the face, but in the presence even of a painted wearer 
of a petticoat one is expected to suffer in silence. 

The fourth of the great buildings is ihe one » devoted" to art. 
When we visited it the other day tbe exhibits were not nearly all 
in place; but if we may pass judgment on the prospective whole 
from the present part, then— but the exterior of the house is very 
handsomel In these hard days of Chicagos, Milwaukees, St. 
Pauls, and Denvers, it is pleasant to find opportunity for con- 
gratulating an architectl With regard to the inside of the art 
building— but it is soothing to hear the plaintive cry of the quail 
in the shrubbery of tbe park, and to listen to the sad soughing of 
the wind through the pines I And if one likes fireworks and can- 
non, one need not wait for the Fourth of July— they may be en- 
joyed in the art building every hour in the day. The spectacular, 
the bold, the lurid have their place; they are useful in war, pan- 
tomimes, circuses and politics. The girl in a red jacket always 



ovcr>hadowa the d imort, tine. sensitive littlr Mm in brown, but 

HtM Brown ■ marries firat and gets the baal has band 1 

Irown is In thr art building, it is true, and she la serj dainty 

and Una and winsome, but Mtus Red Jacket— ah, what a wild, 

brar.en flirt she is I 

After all, what is a clrcoj without Ins sideshows? We would 
not give up the giant. the fat woman, tha make- charmer, the 
loose-skinned man ■. - wonder why there are no loose-skinned 
women!) for all tin- < l- phantH and bareback riders and yellow- 
Wlgged lairiea of the circus ring. And so it is here and so it wan 
at Chicago. The " concessionaire" was not known nt tbe I Vn- 
tennlal; he was born at Paris (whence his nnim ), and at Chicago 
he was a roaring lion, overshadowing tbe Columbian Pair itself. 
The greater and best part of his litter are with us at the Midwin- 
ter Fair, aud how they do roar! They are the buffoon of the 
drama, the FalstaiT of Shakespeare. If one may learn in the four 
great buildings, one may laugh In the score of private shows. 
They are the evolution of tbe Punch and Judy of old English 
county fairs. If, in the four big buildings, one may observe the 
evolution of serious genius, in the " concessions'* one may see an 
equally wonderful development in the fun-making talent. Nor 
is it all fun. The most remote corners of tne world have been 
raked to find queer people, things and occupations. Whole vil- 
lages from Turkey, Egypt, Hawaii, Japan, Esquimault and God 
knows what other places have been pulled up from their native 
anchorage and planted here under our noses. Tbe genius and 
daring of the showman are marvelous. Queer modifications, too, 
are in evidence. The ricksha of Japan is drawn at the Midwin- 
ter Fair by Americana in blue tights, instead of Japanese in brown 
skins. Pretty Yankee girls sell tickets for Oriental shows, and 
charge nothing extra for the smile which they give with each 
ticket. And the bewildering lot of pretty women everywhere! 

While many of the sideshows were those which were at Chi- 
cago, some are new. The "'49 Mining Gamp" is chief of the 
novelties. It represents a mountain village in the rough mining 
days of 1849, when money was plenty, morals were lax, laws 
were unknown and a human life was held in light esteem. Both 
the dead and the living features of the show are strange, even to 
the present civilization of California, and incredible toithose who 
never saw the gold fields in the early days. Not alone have we 
the identical cabins and trappings of such poor miners of other 
days as J. W. Mackay and George C. Perkins, but we have fan- 
dangos danced by pretty Spanish girls, a variety show, a thea- 
tre and many other things true to the old style. 

Of the ventre dancers and the queer scenes of the Cairo Street 
who has not heard? As for the slant-eyed maidens who writhe 
to wierd fiddl ng and lomtomming in minor keys, to call their 
work dancing is a queer misnomer. They are not dancers, but 
contortionists. As contortionists they are wonderful, because 
novel. Nice women might prefer sword-swallowing, but men do 
not. If it comes to a question of honh soi, why — but those un- 
dressed tan-colored giris cast ravishingly languorous glances! 

Colonel Boone not only roars with his lions, but he flutters 
with his almost human cockatoos, squeals with his clown pigs, 
and altogether (Mmlle. Carlotta of course excepted) is the most 
interesting trained animal of tbe wonderful lot. As for the lions, 
if they do not eat Mmlle. Garlotta someday, they have mighty 
poor taste. 

The Firth Wheel is a solemn affair. Its business ia to go 
around, and it attends to that, and is in no hurry about it. It 
seems to worry very little about the people whom it takes away 
up and showB the earth and the fullness thereof. What an ele- 
gant place for suicide this would be .f the cruel guards would not 
lock the car doors ! But of course it would be awkward to have 
the machinery all gummed up with headlong people! 

The Colorado Mine is a wonderful show. A mountain in 
miniature is sliced down the center, showing hundreds of little 
mannikins of men delving in the depths for gold, besides all the 
hoisting machinery, the shafts, pumps, tunnels, winzes, slopes, 
sumps, drilB and heaven knows what not, all in activity by in- 
genious machinery. 

In the Hawaiian Village you may eat one-finger poi, served by 
a pretty Hawaiian woman, and see mauy curious things, while 
alongside is the panorama of the great burning crater of Kilauea, 
a wonderful show, with striking effects from artificial light be- 
hind the canvas. 

The Mirror Maze, where there are so many of you that you 
never know which is the sober one; the Egyptian Mystery, 
where a stone statue turns slowly, before your eyes, into a 
beautiful girl; the Haunted Swing, the occupants of which 
think they are being turned up side down, to the screaming dis- 
may of the ladies; the wonderful Japanese Village, with red- 
cheeked girls in tea-gardens and with hoary old pines and cypress 
twelve inches high; the E.quiraau Village, with imitation snow 
hut and the queerest of little men, women and children, all clad 
in furs; Dame's Inferno, which takes people in through a big 
hungry mouth full of fangs — these are but a part of the great 
array; and besides them are the beautiful houses of the counties 
and Western States. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb . 3, 1894. 



AN ART STUDENT IN PARIS. 

Pauis, January 18, 1894. 
T AM entitled to be a student in the Ecole des Beaux Arcs now. 
1 I went there and showed some drawings to the great G£rome, 
and he said " Pas tnal," and wrote a letter admitting me to the 
great school. Bat I don't go regularly. I am going to wait till 
next summer, when all the boys are away, and I shan't be both- 
ered. That letter from Gerome will admit me any time I want to 
go. If I should start in to work there now, I would receive the 
most dreadful hazing imaginable. 

I attend the anatomy lectures at the Beaux Arts. They are 
quite interesting and instructive, as a corpse is brought in and 
dissected for the benefit of the art students, to show them the 
muscles and bones. It is quite grewsome at first, but one soon 
gets used to it. The other afternoon, when I was there, they 
brought in a fresh cadaver from some hospital, and removed the 
skin from the neck to the middle, exposing all the muscles of 
the abdomen, the shoulders, and one of the arms. The professor 
had a long paper knife with which he loosened and lifted up the 
muscles, and he moved the limbs so that their action could be 
studied. A nude Italian model stood beside him, and worked 
his muscles at the same time and in a manner similar to the pro- 
fessor's manipulation of the cadaver's. The professor poked 
around the subject and then put his wet fingers on the poor model 
to illustrate bis point, and the living subject turned pale and no 
doubt wondered if he, too, would be cut up some day. A cadaver 
is kept about three months, and is left in pickle between times. 
One student got very sick at the ghastly demonstration, and we 
had to take him out to the fresh air. 

The American female art students in Paris are quite a queer 
thing, but one gets used to them as to all other queer things. 
They have a peculiar walk, by which one can identify them a 
long way off, and wear their hair very long and not well combed 
— the more around the eyes the better it suits them. Then, of 
course, there is the big paint box always slung across their shoul- 
ders, with paint smeared on the outside, and three or four can- 
vases of studies in their hands. Occasionally one sees eyeglasses 
on them. 

From some of the models who pose for the girl students it has 
been learned that the girls have gay times among themselves at 
the studio, smoking nice little cigarettes, and saying an uncon- 
ventional word now and then to break the monotony. Over at 
Collrossie's night academy there are several American girls draw- 
ing with the boys, while they have a class of their own, and al- 
though the boys carry on and talk, and draw "shocking" pic- 
tures on the walls, the girls do not appear to be disturbed in the 
least. The other night one of these damsels asked me, " Do yon 
really have thanksgiving away, away oat in San Francisco ? 
Why, how can you? " She was surprised when I told her that 
we did, as she thought that Westerners did not know what it 
meant. 

To-morrow night is to be » Ladies' Night" at oar club, and of 
course all the girl students will be there, and dancing will be the 
feature of the evening. Many of the boys have dress suits and 
" low-neck shirts," and patent-leather shoes, bat I shall not be 
there, as some of the girls are dreadfully "stuck up," although 
there are several who are fall of fun and talk, and not afraid of 
a fellow's clothes. I have met several of these at Dr. Newell's, 
who runs the girls' club. Every Sunday night he preaches a 
sermon and the girls sing for a while, and then dry sweet cakes 
and lemonade are served, and every one is presumed to partake 
of each and look pleasant. As soon as the lemonade comes in 
the girls all rise and look pleasant, then they go over and talk to 
the boys, who are all invited. One night there one of the girls 
asked me if I could make caramels, and when I told her •' no," 
she informed me how they and all sorts of candies are made, and 
several kinds of pie (including pumpkin), and said that she was 
so fond of pancakes and syrup and mush. One dear thing asked 
me if I didn't think Dr. Newell was "just too lovely," and I 
said " yes." Such is the girls' club, but there are some pleasant 
girls there just the same. 

I went to the Theatre GaitiS Montpa/nasse with several of the 
boys, and saw a French variety show. Here the students hang 
out, and nearly half of the Julian AcadCimie were there. You do 
not pay as you go in, but take your seat according to the price 
you waat to pay, and then the waiter comes around later with 
something to drink, and takes your franc. A drink is thrown in. 
I must say that the show was not of the highest order, in a moral 
sense, as the conversations were a bit Frenchy; but it is aston- 
ishing to see how many respectable women and families go and 
listen to such things. 

My little room is very cosey since I fitted it up for the winter's 
work. I bought a stove and its appurtenances for eight francs. 
Having made up my mind to do a great deal of illustrating at 
night instead of spending all my evenings at the club, I got oil 
for my lamp, coal for my stove, a cup and saucer, knife, fork 
and spoon, a frying pan and a saucepan. Then I laid in a stock 
of provisions— a can of condensed milk, sardines, ham, a pound 
of sugar, Swiss cheese, cocoa and other things, for I have supper 
in my room now. It is delightful. I arrive from school about 
5 o'clock, start a fire in my petit fourneau, and put on the sauce- 



pan full of water to heat. While it is getting hot I light my lamp, 
and set the table near the stove. I make two or three cnps of 
fine cocoa, broil a chop or a slice of ham, fetch out bread and 
cheese— and there you are! 'Gad, but it is fine and cosey I While 
I am eating, I warm my feet by the fire, read the papers and 
make toast. After supper I wash things up, light my pipe and 
then get to work. The supper does not cost much, and often we 
boys unite and sup around among ourselves in tarn. 

T 1 who used to be an artist on the 8an Francisco Chronicle, 

had a deuce of a time the first two days he was here. You see, 
he cannot speak French at all, and when he got hungry he went 
to the nearest restaurant. In order to make the garcon under- 
stand him he had to draw a picture of what he desired. He 
wanted some cheese, and he drew a piece of cheese on paper, and 
had to make it look as natural as possible before the waiter couid 
understand him. Then he had to draw a plate of soup and a 
beef steak. He had a deuced hard time trying to draw the steak, 
and the waiters had a great deal of fun out of it. 
^ You never saw so many beggars as there were out on New 
Year's day. The streets were crowded with them. There were 
thousands of women in rags, with their shivering babies and 
children around them, while at every step were cripples of every 
degree lying on the sidewalk, showing some diseased or ampu- 
tated limb for public view. This was sickening in many in- 
stances. They gathered in a good harvest, too, as everybody was 
liberal on that day. Edoukd Cucuel. 

VAILLANT AS A POET. 



THE Revue Liberlaire publishes the following lines by Vaillant, 
who was condemned to be executed for the bomb outrage in 
the French Chamber of Deputies: 

Eeves Etoiles. 
Ami, pourquoi douter? car I'anrore s'enflamme, 
Les peuples vont briser le joug des oppresseurs; 
Hourra, cent fois hourra, le genre hurnain proclame 
Les frontieres bas et ies nations sceurs. 

L'autorite n'est plus, 1'HatnanitG s'avance, 
Guid£e en son chemin par la saine raison; 
La science foornit li l'homme l'abondance, 
L'on n'entend dans les airs que rires et chansons. 

Allons, rejouis-toi, car voici l'Harmonie, 
Le regne de justice et de fraternity; 
La terre heureuse, enfin, dans sa coarse infinie 
Emporte son bonheur parmi l'imrnensite'. 



COLONEL J. M. LITCHFIELD was tried before a jury in Judge 
Campbell's Court this week, on a charge of battery, and was 
found not guilty. T. Harowitz, who brought the charge, was one 
of a number of tailors with whom Colonel Litchfield had had 
some trouble. On November 23rd, last, he followed Colonel 
Litchfield and annoyed him, whereupon he received a well- 
deserved blow on the head from Litchfield's cane. 



IT was a happy inspiration which led George T. Marsh, the 
dealer in Japanese art goods under the Palace Hotel, to set up 
the Japanese Village at the Midwinter Fair. This is one of the 
most picturesque, interesting and instructive of the private shows. 
It has tea gardens, peasants living in their cottages, bazars, arti- 
sans at work, a lake, a waterfall, storks, pretty Japanese girls, 
and wonderful specimens of microscopic gardening. 



IT is curious to reflect that the Japanese here deemed themselves 
too good to draw the jinrickshas at the Midwinter Fair, and 
that plenty of worthy white men readily undertook the work. 
The public might show their appreciation of this admirable step. 
It is honest, decent work, of which no good white man need 
be ashamed. 



The Overland Flyer. 



The Union Pacific is the only line running new Pullman 
double drawing-room sleepers and dining cars, San Fran- 
cisco to Chicago, without change, in three and one-half 
days. All tickets good via Salt Lake City and Denver. 

Select Tourist Excursions through to Chicago, without 
change, every Thursday in charge of managers. 

Steamship tickets on sale to and from all points in Eu- 

For sleeping-car accomodations and tickets call on D. W. Hitch- 
cock, General Agent, 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco; F. R. 
Ellsworth, Agent, 918 Broadway, Oakland, Cal. ; or G. F. Herr, 229 
South Spring street, Los Angeles, Cal. 




The greatly enlarged and improved facilities of Abel & Priest, 
the photographers, 131 Post street, place this popular establishment 
in the lead on this Coast. Among its specialities is college class 
work, some splendid specimens of which have been turned out. All 
other kinds of artistic work are done, the posing, finishing and other 
details receiving the closest attention from the most skillful operators. 



Thousands of mothers give their children Steedman's Soothing 
Powders during the teething period. 



!, 189-1. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



LIGHT CAME WITH THE DAWN. 



LIL stood with drooping hcml. It was late and the moon bad 
risen, making the mountains look black against the violet 
star set skt. Now and then one of the large wagons belonging 
to Wells. Fargo <fc Co. rumbled tbrongb the narrow street, Un- 
sound of the heavy wheels dying away In the distance. The sa- 
loons weie all lighted, and fitful ibouta came from behind their 
closed doors. Two Mexicans, both drunk, were quarreling on the 
corner, the wife of one of them mingling her angr.' voice with 
their oaths. They jostled Lit, but sbe ooved patiently out of 
their way, shivering a little, for the Arizona nights are cold. 

Her soft brown eyes were fixed with pathetic tenderness on the 
door through which came the sound of discordant music. "Thea- 
tre Varieties" was painted over it in gaudy yellow letters, and the 
flaring gas jets displayed a poster depicting a disheveled-looking 
woman, with streaming hair, arrayed in a few gold chains, 
which hung from ber waist, and a yard or two of gauze. Under 
this remarkable production it wa- announced in large red print 
that "Carlotta, the Queen of Serpentine Dancers," would edify 
the residents of Tombstone with an exhibition of ber skill. 

Poor Lil! She bated the picture, for did she Dot have to stand 
before it night after night waiting for Rex ? And did be not al- 
ways come out flushed and excited, his handsome young face 
weariDg a look that did not belong there? It was not altogether 
bis fault. He could not stay in his lonely cabin, a prey to doubt 
and dispair, and there was nowhere else to go. Lil always wait- 
ed, no matter how cold the night. She never reproached him, 
never upbraided, but only laid her soft head against his shoulder 
lovingly. Sbe knew all about it, for he bad told her — how he had 
loved a beautiful girl, and bow his suit had been refused because 
he was poor; how, roving to make his fortune, and thus win his 
love, be had come to Arizona, and like many others, was left, 
when silver went down, penniless, reckless and desperate. 

Yes, Lil knew. She knew that he had given up all hope, and 
she sorrowed over him, longiDg for some friendly hand to save 
him. Hers was the one heart faithful to him, bis the one hand 
to which her wild will bent submissive. But he needed more 
than her love to make him content. 

It grew later. The bursts of music and shouts of laughter from 
inside the music ball seemed out of place in the solemn moon- 
light. Pete, the doorkeeper, called out to ber as she moved im- 
patiently: " Keep quiet, can't you, Lil?'' But she did not care 
for Pete, and she seemed to listen to what he was saying to the 
two persons to whom he was talking — quite civilly, for him. A 
man was inquiring for Hex Hardwicke. Lil listened eagerly. 
Then followed a good deal of broken talk, and then a woman's 
voice, soft and sweet. 

" Never mind, papa," it said; "we will find him to-morrow. 
Let us get away from this place." 

Tbey passed close to Lil, and as sbe turned her aoft eyes 
toward them, the girl whose voice she had heard stopped, 

» Whom are you waiting for?" she asked, softly. " Is it cot 
cold out here?" She laid her hand caressingly on Lil's face. "To- 
morrow," she whispered, "to-morrow;" then passed on with 
her father, who had called her impatiently. 

Lil mused long after the incident. Who was the girl with the 
soft voice? Sue was different from the girls Lil knew. And why 
were they inquiring for Rex? Perhaps they were friends, per- 
haps they would save him; and Lil's heart grew sad as she 
thought that, if all this came to pass, he would have to leaveber. 

At last the green door flew open, and the noisy crowd pushed 
their way out, bringing with them the close air of the music hall. 
Rex came with them. He looked weary and disgusted, and did 
not answer the coarse pleasantries his companions called after 
him, He threw his arm around Lil's neck and pressed his hot 
face to hers. 

» Little one," he said, " I am tired of it all. How can we end 
it?" Lil looked at him lovingly, and her eyes said what her 
tongue could not, for although she could not speak his language, 
she understood it. " Poor little girl! " he went on remorsefully. 
" You have waited a long time for me, haven't you? " 

They left the town behind them, and went slowly up the rocky 
trail which led to Rex's cabin. For three years he and Lil had 
lived there together, vainly searching for the fortune which was 
to make him happy. For three years he had worked his claim. 
There was a rich vein somewhere, he knew, but he bad never 
found it. For three years Lil had been his one companion, who 
shared his sorrows and his hopes, the one friend who did not de- 
sert him when it was told over the bar of the " Total Wreck" 
that Rex Hardwicke was " dead broke." 

He did not talk to Lil as usual as they wended their way up 
the mountain, but was silent and abstracted; and when they 
reached the cabin door he did not enter. Seizing his pickaxe, he 
went to work as he had not done for many a day. Lil watched 
him wistfully, drooping her head sadly as at last, with a mut- 
tered curse, he tossed his tools aside, and, going indoors, threw 
himself on the cabin floor. 

Lil stood where he had left her, thoughtfully turning over the 
loose rock with her foot. The east had been growing bright, and 



suddenly the tir»t r»yi <■( the nun fell on the tumbled rocktt, niak • 
ing two or three of tbem gliaten and glow In a peculiar way. Lil 
OOOld not andante nd It, and she called softly to Rex. They 
OOnld DOt speak eft. li other*! language, these two, but they talked 
in a language of tin ir own. 

He rose wearily and went to ber. " What do you want, Lil?" 
be asked, hut not impatiently; be waa never Impatient with ber. 
She pushed the broken Atones toward him with her little foot, 
looking at him lovingly with her soft eyes. Kneeling down, he 
examined them eagerly ; then, with a low cry, he threw his arms 
around her. » We have found the velnl " he exclaimed. "Lil, 
oh, Lil, ruygirl!" and she fell the hot tears on her neck. "We 
will go down. Lil, ami find out if it is all true," he said finally, 
springing to bis feet, and Lil rejoiced as sbe saw his face, usually 
so downcast, bright with joy and hope. 

As they went down into the narrow street, Lil saw, standing 
in front of the music hall, the tall gentleman and the fair girl 
whom she had seen the night before. Here were the friends who 
would help Rex, and in spite of his remonstrances she went to- 
ward tbem. He tried to hold her back, but in vain. She, usu- 
ally so obedient, bo submissive to him, paid no heed to his voice. 

The girl and her father were talking to Pete, evidently inquir- 
ing their way. Rex did not see them until Lil, hurrying forward, 
brushed against the girl's dainty skirts. Then he glanced up. 

" Why, Lill" he said, reproachfully, pulling ber back. 

At the sound of bis voice the girl turned and looked straight 
into his eyes. There was a moment's silence, then with a cry of 
" Lilian! " Rex left Lil, and, seizing the girl's bands, kissed her. 
At this, the gentleman also turned. 

" Well," he began angrily, " of all infernal — " But here he 
stopped. " Rex ! " he exclaimed, holding out his hand. •« So we 
have found you at last! We've come to take you back, fortune 
or no fortune. This girl of mine declared that she would wait no 
longer, and that if I did not come with her she would come alone. 
So here we are. Will you come back with us, my lad ? " 

" Yes," he answered, his eyes devouring the fair face before 
him. 

But he felt a soft touch on his arm, and turning, he saw Lil re- 
garding him with a sad reproachful face. His heart smote him 
for his neglect. 

"Did you think I was going without you, little girl?" he 
asked tenderly. " I would not leave you, dear," and, loosening 
his hold on Lillian's hand, he laid his arm around Lil's neck. Do 

you think his sweetheart was angry ? Ah, no! for Lil why, Lil 

was only a little brown, white-faced Indian ponyl 

San Francisco, January, 1894. Beatriz Bellido de' Luna. 



However elegant and carefully made his outer garments, good, 
well-fitting underclothing, such as that sold by John W. Carmany, 
25 Kearny street, is essential to comfort. 



Mothers be sure and use "Mrs. Winslows' Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething. 



Unlike the Dutch Process 

No Alkalies 

— OR — 

Other Chemicals 

are used in the 
preparation of 

W. BAKER & CO.'S 

reakfastCocoa 

tvhicJi is absolutely 
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i It has morethan three times 
\ the strength of Cocoa mixed 
j with Starch, Arrowroot or 
_ * Sugar, and is far more eco- 
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It is delicious, nourishing, and easily 

DIGESTED. 

Sold by Grocers everywhere. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mais, 




FINE ART 



113 QEARY ST. 



Goods in Great Variety. Vases, 
Bronzes, and Marble Statuary. 
Mirrors, Pictures, and Framing, 
OUR Specialty. 

S. & G. QUMP, 



FRANK KENNEDY, LAW-OEFICE, ROOM 66, MURPHY BTnlMNG 
(Third floor), 1286 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



Feb . 3, 1894. 




fetJg&lto 



'We Obev no -Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



THE week's play at the Baldwin, Saints and Sinners, ia 30 well 
known here, both aa to its dramatic strength and intereat 
and the almost incomparable personation ol ita leading character 
bv J H 8toddart, that it requires no farther discission than 
that' of the new people in the cast. Mr. Wilton Lackaye 
makes of Captain Fanahaw a thorough villain, who deliberates 
upon the expediency of being bad, and after duly balancing its 
advantages and disadvantages, decides in favor of the former 
and goes in for villainy with a set purpose. He is a hard villain, 
too, whose utter selfishness is so transparent to the audience as 
to make Letty's trust, or even half-trust, Incomprehensible but 
for the little touch of art which inspires his fitful lapses into the 
half common-aenae, half passionate, and wholly persuasive plead- 
ing which renders such men so dangerous aa to make it almoat a 
safe wager that no woman in love will find herself able to resist 
without the warning light of previous experience as to the inevi- 
table end of such baseless faith. If this is an intentionally drawn 
antithesis, it is an artistic one, while, alas also a "toncho 
nature." At the same time, Mr. Lackaye endues the character 
with an unrelenting hardness and calculation which are doubtless 
better for moral purposes than the serious and gloomy longing 
which Herbert Kelcey gives to philandering "villains, and 
which so enlists the auditor's sympathy as to make him (or her, 
for that matter) almost wish that he may succeed, and to ahare 
the diacomfiture which alwaya overtakes finally this class of vil- 
lains on the stage— and elsewhere, let lis hope even while we 

°Mias Arthur'a rendering of Letty Fletcher, the minister's 
daughter, ia as differently shaded from that given in its last pre- 
sentation here. She gives it more force, more depth, more char- 
acter. The interval between the flight and the letter, which ia 
left to the imagination, fits in not more unnaturally with this 
characterization than with the weaker and less self-assertive one. 
Letty, as Miss Arthur presents her, seems to have yielded rather 
to the force of circumstances with which her lover has sur- 
rounded her by the change of trains-as those circumatancea ap- 
pear to an inexperienced girl— than to his persuasions, ibis de- 
lineation also comports better with her subsequent "righteous 
wrath" and the resolution which makes her leave the false hero 
and return with her old father to the bitter expiation of neigh- 
borhood contempt or pity. 

One of the strongest and most finished pieces of acting in tne 
play is done by George Fawcett in the ungracious role of Samuel 
Hoggard. From first to last, in the pompous assertiveness of 
the "self-made" man, in the wily oilinesa of hia persuasion of the 
good minister that he be left free to appropriate the widow a for- 
tune, in his coarse and brutal threats of vengeance and the mean 
and narrow means used in its execution, even in the expression 
of his Bmug countenance when others " have the stage, tne 
Bounderby of Bethel Chapel is before ua, both as an individual 
and a type. The presentation ia one to be remembered. 

Mr Bell, in Ralph Kingsmill, demonatratea anew the fact that, 
despite hia fine and manly stage presence, there is something in 
his voice aud personality which makes him unauited to atrongly 
dramatic and inten8e roles. 

• » » 
If San Franciscans are to have on their hands another Lillian 
Russell affair, it may be as well to put in onr plea and submit the 
caseou its merits from the beginning. No one who saw Miss 
Collins on Tuesday night could doubt that the wonder of two 
continenta was aeriously "put out" about something. Whether 
it was that the Tuesday morning papers had not gushed over her 
sufficiently, or whether she resented the demand for "la-ra-ra 
(she should have felt flattered) on the Bcore that the flutter of 
Lottie Collins' akirta in anything sne chose to give ought to satisfy 
San Francisco, certain it is she confronted her audience with a 
greeting which was defiant, not to aay vixenish. The expression 
increased aa ahe went on and culminated in unconcealed rage 
when, evidently after a akirmish with her manager, she came 
hack and, with an audible and vicious, "Well, if youwill have it, 
gave a few flops and leaps which suggested, perhaps, the famous 
dance. 

The simple fact ia that Miss Collins has mistaken the situation. 
The San Francisco public did not care a rap aoout seeing Lottie 
Collins in her individual capacity. What it did want to see was 
the famous dance which had startled the BaBtern and European 
world into apasms of amazed delight or ridicule. Lottie Collins 
meant to us simply "Ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay," and when instead ot 
that scarlet nightmare she gave a flat-toned sketch in more than 
questionable taste, the applause was naturally tempered by tne 
fact. Even then had she gracefully and good-naturedly yielded 
to the clamorous demand she might have won double recognition 
A San Franciscan audience ia above all good-natured and quick 



to recognize good nature, and Miss Collins had a chance to launch 
her cockle-shell craft at once on the high tide of popular favor 
with no danger of future swamping. But the fatal diaeaae that 
attacka none so virulently as the variety actress— an occipital 
elephantiasis, so to speak— blinded Mias Collins to the facta. She 
has issued her imperial ukaae, "Take that or nothing," and the 
public will naturally aasert ita right to take the latter alternative. 

* * * 

Mi88 Lottie Collins' management announces that she will give 
her " Ta-ra-ra" every night next week. If she had condescended 
to say so when it was demanded, instead of giving an evidently 
unwilling and indefinite half-promise qualified by a " perhaps," 
she would have made herself more popular. It ia well for the 
public that with the managerial bit in their mouth8 even the 
variety "prancers" must yield to the rein now and then. The 
Boom-de-ay performance is not an intellectual treat, not even an 
£esthetic one, but if it ia what the public wants and paya for, 
there is no good reason why it should be balked of its wish. The 
Ta-ra-ra dance will be given at 8:30 and A Naughty Substitute 
at 9:30 every evening. 

# * * 

The California will doubtless continue to be crowded aa it haa 
been ao far, deapite this contretemps. The theatre is a popular 
place of resort. While the prices are not prohibitory, even to 
moderate meana, it ia one of the handsomest houses in America, 
and strictly firat-class in management. The same may be said 
of the Howard Athenasum company. Catering to every taote, it 
muat present specialties which, to aome auditors, are unattrac- 
tive; but all, or nearly all, are the best in their respective linea. 
Shaeffer, athlete and equilibrist, certainly deserves to be placed 
at the head. We have never seen a better here, and there 13 
probably no better in the world, since all that he does is done 
with absolute perfection, and perfect admits of no comparative 
degree. His work is not only marvelously clever, but each act 
is neatly finished off, and there is a dash and spirit about it all as 
captivating as the unfailing bonhomie of his manner. The audi- 
ence roars itself hoarse over his performance, and it takes some- 
thing to shake San Francisco out of ita apathy. The College 
Athletes have a neat and pretty act; the Avolos bring more fire 
and music out of a xylophone than ia usually evoked from that 
instrument; Arvillo gives some good musical imitations and a 
clever ventriloquist song; Terry ia an amuaing shadowgrapbist; 
and Mr. Albert Christian sings a capital song of monkiBh jollity 
in a noble voice and excellent style— decidedly the best ainging in 
Miss Collins' " musical sketch," A Naughty Substitute. 
* * * 
The Tivoli is having a good second week with its excellent 
production of Milloecker'a beautiful opera, The Beggar Student. 
Next week Nanon, Genee's melodious comedy opera, will be put 
on with a very promising cast, including Gracie Plaisted as 
Nanon, Tillie Salinger as Ninon de L'Enclos, Fannie Liddiard aa 
Madame de Maintenon, Robert Dunbar aa Count d'Aubigne, and 
the other parts as well assigned. 

The panoramic view of Yosemite on exhibition at the corner 
of Tenth and Market streets, is one of the most realistic things of 
the kind yet shown here. Standing on the central platform, it 
is hard to realize that one is not in reality surrounded by the 
wonders of the famous valley, or that the rushing of lis stupen- 
dous cataract cannot be heard. No visitor to the Midwinter Fair 
should omit the Yoaemite Panorama from his round of sight- 
seeing. 

* * • 

The Wigwam Theatre is still one of the best patronized of our 
cheaper places of amusement, a firat-class vaudeville performance 
at one-tenth the uanal price of admission seeming to be exactly 
suited to the present "stringency." The "Rooster Band," Gilbert 
and Goldie, and other features delight the crowd nightly. 

* * * 

The Vienna Prater is one of the most attractive resorts on the 
Midwinter Fair grounds. The famoua Imperial Austrian Band, 
probably the greatest musical organization of the kind in the world, 
with the Tyrolese warblera in coatumea of four hundred years 
ago the wild Hungarian "Czardas," and other striking novelties 
make this a wonderland to the untraveled visitor, aa well aa a 
treat to the music-lover. Refreshments of the most elaborate 
kind are served in the immense hall capable of seating 4000 
people— aoon to be increased to 6000— and altogether the Vienna 
Prater ia sure to become one of the most popular features of the 
Fair. ; 

The first production in America of Henry Pettit's latest drama, 
A Woman's Revenge, will be given at the Baldwin next week, and 
will donbtless have a typical first-night audience on Monday 

evening. John T. Kelly, in McFee of Dublin, will follow the 

Howard Athemeum company at the California. James O'Neill 

will open Stockwell's Theatre February 11th. An attractive 

programme will be rendered this afternoon at the Carr-Beel con- 
cert at Golden Gate Hall. The Becond Fleiahman-Landsberger 

concert will take place next Thursday evening at Golden Gate 
Hall. 



■ . 1894. 



-AN Ki: VNCISCO NEWS I UTTER 



THE CX)RRECT YOl'Nu MAN OF FASHION. 



I HEAR on excellent authority <«yj • writer In * leading Lon- 
don piper). Hint ibe Idiotic stare la still In favor among out 
gilded youth, and IhoM wbo dtairi lo Iw in the van 01 tuhlon must 
cultivate it carefully. There ar.- sensible, honest, kindly taoea which 
refuse to wear it permanently, though a MobUooa of it may be 
donned, after considerable effort (..r half an hour or so at a time. 
This is useful for wearing at one's clob or in the stall of a theatre, 
and it at once stamps the proprietor of the stare as l>ein>: " in it." 
The fashion is not confined to England. It reigni In New York, and 
even in far Australia there is a select coterie ol golden or gilded youth 
who are beginning to learn how to abstract every atom ol expression 
from the countenance, and to look on vacancy or seem to do so. As 
yet. there is no considerable expertness achieved In the matter in 
Antipodean circles, but in New York a very fair impression of imbe- 
cility is conveyed in the look of the ullra-fasbionable yonng man. 

There are various other important matters on which a transatlan- 
tic authority has been instructing the youth of his generation. The 
one involving the most serious responsibility is connected with car- 
rying a cane, or stick, as it is better form to call it. It must be left 
at home when going to business, to church, or to make calls. The 
idea of the latter prohibition is that, if a call is made on a lady, 
cane in hand, the inference would be that the caller is on sufficiently 
intimate terms to look in on her casually at any time. There is cer- 
tainly snbtlety in this view. 

It is well that the novice should be made aware that the lowest 
depths of vulgarity is touched by carrying an umbrella in a case. It 
is also an important item of information that the gloves and cane 
must be carried in the same hand. To do otherwise is seriously to 
err in social forms. Our instructor declares that to attend oratorios 
and philharmonic concerts is thoroughly bad form, indicating a ten- 
dency to be pedantic. It is much better to go to a horse show. 

It is by no means considered correct to shake hands. The proper 
way is to take hold of the fingers of one's acquaintance at the second 
joints, and bestow upon them one or two decisive little jerks, as 
though testing their strength. " No, 1 thank you," is a form of words 
no longer heard in good society, having some time since been re- 
placed by " No, thanks." No man with any claim to social position 
would consent to pronounce the " g " at the end of the present par- 
ticiple of verbs. "Comin' and goin' " are the correct forms just now. 
" Don't you know " is ridiculously correct. Men of perception do 
not care to be more accurate than others of their set. " Don't-chi- 
know" is more customary, and the pronunciation marks the man as 
riding on the topmost crest of the social wave. There must be a 
staccato sound about the phrase, which alternates pleasantly with 
the languid drawl. The latter is still in favor, and accompanies ad- 
mirably the studied lack of animation in the expression and general 
wooden look of the face. 

To revert for a moment to the cane, or walking stick. There is 
much to be deduced from the manner in which it is carried. The 
correct style is to hold it at an angle of forty-five degrees, with 
the ferule uppermost and forward. This is the sort of thing that no 
man could possibly discover for himself. The natural man would 
incline to cany his stick in such fashion as would tend to direct its 
point to the ground. This unsophisticated mode would at once re- 
veal him as uninitiated in the minor morals of good manners. 

The latest mode of arranging the male hair, as practiced in New 
York, and possibly nearer home as well, is worth noting. First it is 
made thoroughly wet, then brushed and parted, after which the 
head is swathed with linen bands, which is kept on until the hair is 
thoroughly dry. This method produces the plastered appearance 
which is now recognized as good form. Though cordiality of manner 
is rapidly becoming obsolete, and is utterly condemned by all who 
have studied the subject, yet it is a recognized fact that amiability 
has now superseded sarcasm, and the up-to-date young man prac- 
tices a careless superficial benevolence of pronouncing every woman 
charming, and every man a good fellow. The scathing, satiric wit 
of the last century was as the nadir to this zenith of appreciative 
recognition of the best that is in every human being. After all this 
minute detail of what is correct in minor matters, who shall say that 
feminine etiquette is more involved and difficult than masculine? 



No well-appointed house can show a finishing touch unless it has 
a number or Japanese vases, bronzes, Satsuma ware, curios, etc. 
Geo. T. Marsh, under the Palace Hotel, on Market street, has assort- 
ment so large that every taste can be pleased. 

D I A Al »•> C A - L BANCROFT & CO. 
t^lMI«W^ 333 Sutter St, S.F. 

Knabe, Haines, Bush & Gerts, and others. 
Cash or installments. Please call or correspond. 

nyfliW BANCROFT 

THE GRANDEST ON EARTH. SEE 

YOSEMITE PANORAMA, 

(Corner of Tenth and Market Streets.) 
NOW OPEN. Admission 25ots 



- .. — GR *N0 OPERA HOUSE. 

Mondar Henln, .Frhrii.ry Mb 

CONCERT Under the Direction of 

Given l.y the J. II KOSKWAI.D. 

SATURDAY 

MORNING 

ORCHESTRA 

For the Joint benefit ol t lie 
CIIILMKVS linsNTU. «nd the NMMR UIDBRfiAEHI SOCIETY. 

RESERVED SEATS, SI BO. 

Sale of scats will benln at Koblcr & Chase's music store, 20-30 OTarrell 
Street, this Saturday mor ning at nine o'clock. 

HlETwiLirORNIA THEATRE. 

AlHaykanACo.. ..Proprietors. | J. J. Gottlob Manager. 

Monday, February 5th— Second and last week of 

LOTTIE COLLINS, 
In conjunction with the NEW 

HOWARD ATHENJEUM 

SPECIALTY COMPANY. 

Monday, February 12— John T. Kelly, in the merry eccentricity, 

McriiB or m'm.iN 

BALDWIN THEATRE. 

AlHayman&Co Lessees and Proprietors 

A. M. PALMER'S COMPANY (From Palmer's Theatre). 

Monday, February 5— Announcement extraordinary. First presentation 
in America of Henry Pettit's successful drama, 

A WOMAN'S REVENGE. 

Now running in London to crowded houses. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Keeling Bros Proprietors and Managers. 

Last nights. Second and last week ! 

An emphatic hit. Millocker's charming opera, 

THE BEGGAR STUDENT. 



Big hit of ROBERT DUNBAR. 
Monday, February 5— NANOBJ. 
Populab Prices 



.25 and 50c 



WIGWAM THEATRE, 

Mrs. Chas. Meyer, Proprietor. Frank and Albert Meyer, Business Managers. 
San Francisco's Recognized Vaudeville Family Resort. 

Commencing Monday evening, February 5th— First time here of Dolph 
Levino's sensation on border life, entitled 

THE FRONTIER. 
After which will appear the following specialties: Our latest importation, 
Allilab ABailila'B Novelty Company; the great Rooster String Band: the 
Musical Masons, playing on cobble stones, shovels, wheelbarrows, picks, 
etc.; Madame Cordelia, the peerless empress of the tight rope: Spider 
Kelly, light-weight champion, and Young Choynski, welter-weight; Ver- 
non Sisters, burlesque vocalists; Harry A. Emerson, the German mimic; 
Frank Johnson, the wonderful colored cornetist; second week of Mont- 
gomery, Brumage and Little Jim ; Clements and Boyd . the premier Yankee 
comedy duo; the 'Frisco favorites, Gilbert and Goldie; ninth week of 
Dolph and Susie Levino; Al Leech. 

Every evening at 8. Matinee Saturday and Sunday at 2. 

General admission, 10c. Reserved seats, 25c. Opera chairs, 35c. 

Matinee Prices— General admission, 10c. Opera chairs, 25c. 

60LDEN GATE HALL — 625 Sutter St. 

Thursday evening, Feb. 8th— SECOND CONCERT (first series) given by 
NATHAN LANDSBERGER (Violinist) and 
SAMUEL G. FLEISHMAN (Pianist) 

Assisted by Miss Etta Bayley, vocalist; Louis Heine, 'cello; 3. Jaulus, viola. 
Under the management of Philip Hastings. 

Subscription, 3 remaining concerts, $2 25, Single Reserved Seat, $1 00 
Admission, 50 cts. 
Seats on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s, Wednesday morning, Feb. 7th. 

THE VIENNA PRATER.— MIDWINTER FAIL 

VIENNA LIFE. U]m nm mm Hill> 

"VIENNA DANCE. The finest Cuisine in the city of Ban 

"VIENNA MUSIC. Francisco to-day. 

THE IMPERIAL 

String Concert. Xl E ^?^™. ATBR Military Conoert, 
0KCHC.01KA. 

64 SOLOISTS. 
Court Director— DAILY CONCERTS 

FRITZ SCIIEEL. From 3 to 11 f. si. 

I II I I AM CmnADH Tne English actress, coaches ladies and 
LILLIAN DLUURnU. gentlemen for the dramatic profession ; ap- 
pearances arranged. SHAKESPEAREAN ACADEMY, 1007 California 
Street, opposite the Flood Mansion. 



SAN EEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 3. 1894. 



Jf^ looker-op. 



THERE was a party of Arizonans at the Lick House the other 
day who were discussing the untimely death of poor Charley 
Leech up at Grass Valley. Some reference was made to the story 
which has been published, that Leech, who was a fortunate and 
popular miner, had recently, in connection with others, purchased 
the famous gold mine of "Diamond Joe," down near Prescott. 

"By the bye, Toppy," said Si White, addressing "Toppy" John- 
son, a well-known prospector and expert, "it seems to me I've 
heard that you were one of the original locators of 'Diamond 
Joe's mine; is that true?" 

"Yes, that's so, Si," said Toppy, "and yet I never got a dollar 
out of it, though the first time it was sold was for a hundred and 
fifty thousand, and Joe, when he got it, took out more than a 
million and a half." 

"Did they freeze you out, Toppy?" some one asked. 

"Not a bit of it," he replied. "You see, it was this way: Me 
and Nick Palmer located the claim, but after prospecting the 
ledge didn't think it worth the cost of recording the notice. The 
croppings were solid yaller sulpburets, and they stood out and 
shone like a twenty-dollar paralyzer on a 'dobe wall. We 
roasted the stuff and horned it out, but couldn't get a color. It 
was too derned mean, and we threw it up. One day a couple of 
tenderfeet showed up in camp, and wanted to know where they 
could find a mine to locate. Nick and me thought we'd josh 'em, 
so we told 'em there was a ledge of solid gold down on the creek, 
but that it was too heavy for us to carry. Well, them derned 
fools thanked us as polite as a basket of chips, after which they 
went down and put up their notice. Then they got to work, 
hired some greasers, took out a lot of the rock, shipped it East, 
and I'll be blowed if it didn't go six hundred dollars to the ton. 
When I heard of it I wanted to get a nigger to kick me, but 
there wasn't one in camp. The meanest thing about the whole 
thing, though, was when some feller come out there and told as 
that after the boys sold out to Diamond Joe, they used to go 
around telling what a liberal people them Arizonans was, and 
how they just give mines away, because they had more of 'em 
than they wanted." 

# » *■ 

There is a station on the Southern Pacific Railroad down in 
Arizona called Mammoth Tank. Some time ago, when the court 
was in session at Tucson, several lawyers were sitting around in 
the Marshal's otfice when Attorney General Herring came in. 
Herring, who was once an assistant District Attorney in New 
>ork, and who came out to the Territory as a mine owner, but 
who has gone back to his profession, is as ponderous as he is 
pompous, and as rubicund as red wine itself. The conversation 
turned on the railroad and what the corporation had done for 
this one and that one. Presently some body asked Herring what 
the company had done for him. He replied with severity that he 
had received no favors from the Southern Pacific, not even a pass. 

"But," said Colonel Zabriski, " the company has certainly dis- 
tinguished you above every other member of the bar in the Terri- 
tory." 

" How is that? " asked Herring, with interest. 

" They have named a station after you," replied Zabriski. 

" Why, I never heard of that! " exclaimed Herring, quite sur- 
prised and pleased. » Where is the station? " 

"Just up the road," answered Zabriski. " They call it Mam- 
moth Tank." 

* # # 

Mr. E. L. G. Steele contemplates a novel banquet, which can- 
not fail to be interesting. His guests will be confined to those 
gentlemen who have been decorated by foreign governments. 
Mr. Steele himself is a Knight Commander of Kalakaua, and the 
majority of the American Knights to be present will wear that 
order. General W. H. L. Barnes has a decoration from the King 
of Sweden, and George Hall wears the handsome red and green 
button of a Knight Commander, a third degree in the highest 
Turkish order. As the guests will wear the stars and crosses of 
their orders, all of which are of more or less value, a squad of 
police as a protection against footpads, to escort those nobles to 
their respective homes, would not be unadvisable. 
■* * #■ 

The Honorable Sam Parker, the Hawaiian Queen's Minister 
of Foreign Affairs, left for those stormy islands by the China on 
Tuesday. The Honorable Sam, who has entertained in his time 
every man, woman and child from this city worth entertaining, 
had an adventure on this trip which did not get into the dailies. 
He is a man of unusually stalwart frame, standing about six feet 
two in his "vamps," with a frame in proportion. Mr. Parker 
was returning home from a dinner at the Bohemian Club Mon- 
day, and when a block from the Palace, on the south side of 
Market street, halted to light his cigar. An ill-looking ruffian, 



possibly conjecturing from Parker's duBky complexion that he 
was a new arrival, a contingent of the Midwinter Pair, stepped 
in front of him and demanded a dime. Footpad tore had consti- 
tuted part of the after-dinner conversation, and the result was 
that Parker, without a word, caught the fellow in his arms and 
passed him over his head and pitched him into the street at leaBt 
ten good feet from the curbstone. Then the Minister coolly fin- 
ished lighting his cigar, and without a single glance at the pros- 
trate tramp, strolled into his hotel. 

At 8tockwell'8 Theatre, beginning the 11th inst., the popular 
actor, James O'Neill, will open with la first-class company in Monte 
Crista for the first week. Virginius and Richelieu wlli fill the 
second week, and after that, for an indefinite time, the actor 
and his strong company will play an Irish drama, written by 
Mr. William Greer Harrison, of this city, called The Prince of 
Ulster. This play was written for Mr. O'Neill, the two men 
being old friends, and has been under the careful study of the 
actor for a year past. Many competent critics who have read 
this play pronounce it one of the strongest that has been written 
in many years, not only as a drama which complies with all the 
best requirements of the dramatic art, but also as a literary pro- 
duction of the highest merit — a combination which is painfully 
rare in these days of thin and catchy plays, which depend so 
largely on the trickery of the actors. Certainly no one is more 
capable than Mr. Harrison of writing a fine play, and he is es- 
pecially fortunate in having so intelligent and painstaking an 
actor as O'Neill to interpret his work. Mr, Harrison will person- 
ally assist O'Neill with the rehearsals, and will have practical 
charge of the public production. One of the New York dramatic 
papers states that O'Neill had failed to appear at some of the per- 
formances announced. This is false, for he has never missed a 
date. He is supported by a new leading lady, Miss Lillian Daily, 
who was formerly with Wilson Barrett. 

# # » 

A strange and totally unexpected incident threw the usually 
quiet town of Sausalito into a "fever of excitement" on Sun- 
day last. Business in the cracked crab and clam chowder kiosks 
was totally suspended, as the inhabitants rushed to the water 
front to feast their eyes on the extraordinary spectacle. People 
on the hill, beholding the tumult beneath, conjectured that a sea- 
serpent had invaded Richardson's Bay, and fled precipitately to 
the sea board. And when they saw Senator Jeremiah Lynch 
bending his lithe frame lustily to the oars, bis coat off, his vest 
open to catch heaven's blessed breeze, and his noble and intel- 
lectual forehead crowned with a brand new silk hat (spring style), 
they blessed the heaven that had made them such a man. The 
Senator had totally reformed Sausalito rowing styles. No gentle- 
man, who calls himself a gentleman, will henceforth row along 
the water front with a lady in his boat without the adornment of 
the silk hat. 

* # * 

The nominating committee elected by the Bohemian Club last 
week to select the names of those members who will serve as 
president, vice-president and the other officers, has not yet an- 
nounced the result of its deliberations. Horace Piatt for presi- 
dent represents one faction of the club, and William Greer Harri- 
son another. The following of the latter gentleman argue that 
in addition to being of literary tastes and an accomplished writer, 
he is also possessed of business qualities, and the latter the club 
will require in making a move to its new quarters on Mason 
street. This will be an expensive affair, and the income neces- 
sary to run successfully the new establishment must be an in- 
crease on the present resources. Mr. Piatt iB spoken of as an 
agreeable and fairly talented young lawyer, who can write a 
clever paper and make a good speech. But the interest in the 
matter is, by comparison with past elections, limited. 

* # # 

Consul Hall's speech at the Midwinter Fair banquet was a 
pleasant surprise. Mr. Hall never appeared as an orator before, 
and his effort was decidedly good. He termed the Ottoman Em- 
pire the domain of conquest and victory, and made a brilliant 
defence of the much-abused "Sick Man of the East." Concluding, 
he said: "It has been often said that the Turk, the Moslem, is 
still groping in the depths of ignorance and fanaticism, that he 
clogs up the wheels of that complicated machine called modern 
civilization ; in fact, that he is opposed to every form of advance- 
ment and progress. What an error! What an injustice! Let 
me but call your attention for an instant to one fact: Of all the 
governments of Europe which were called upon to recognize 
officially the California Midwinter Exposition, the Sublime Porte 
was the first to respond." 

# * » 

Colonel Boone, the lion-tamer at the Midwinter Fair, is the bouI 
of chivalry. A very pretty reporter for a local daily begged that 
he permit her to enter the lions' cage. He politely refused, say- 
ing that the beasts would surely dismember her. She pleaded all 
the harder, and then he said: 

" My dear young lady, you are really asking too much of me! 
I cannot afford to Lose those animals, and if I should feed them 
anything bo aweet as you it would surely kill theml" 



It.. 3 1894. 



s.vN n:\\. in, ,> m.ws 1. 1:1 11 1: 



GOTHAM OOS81P. 

""• Siw York. Jar. 

Til Kit K la sometime* glory in an investigation. I had no sooner 
sent off my l»"t letter to you ilian I heard that the Hoard ol 
Directors of the House of Refuge were so well pleased with the 
resnlt ol their inquiries concerning lieutenant Jnngen's manner 
of disciplining the boys under his .are that they are urging him 
to accept the Soperintendency which, owing to Mr. Lnwrey's 
resignation, will soon be vacant. The salary is somewhere away 
np in the thousand?, and the positloD Is deemed a desirable one. 
But Mr. Jungen has not yet made up his mind to accept. A 
sailor lores the sea, and there never yet was an officer in the 
navy who was not happier on his ship than anywhere else in 
the world. Mrs. Jungen is in Philadelphia, where she has been 
visiting Mrs. Cogbian (formerly of Mare Island) and Mrs. Hard- 
ing (born Miss Llllie Jonesi. Mrs. Harding has been entertaining 
also Mrs. Josephine de Greayer. who left for California a few 
days ago, having bad quite enough of the Eastern winter, 
although thus far we cannot really be said to have had any 
winter. 

But it has been cold, moist and variable, and grippe and pneu- 
monia are reaping heavy harvests. Only yesterday that beauti- 
ful and cultivated woman. Madame Laura Scheriner Mapleson, 
was carried or? after an illness of ten days by the dread disease, 
pneumonia. She had a most eventful career, which was so 
full of success and distinction, that it is hard to under- 
stand how she could have accomplished so much in her 
brief life. It was Madame Mapleson (at that time Mrs. Arthur 
Byron, and known on the stage as Laura Scheriner) of whom 
that absurd tale was written five or six years ago, when the 
cables were busy sending trans-Atlantic messages of her having 
been poisoned and her body thrown into the Bosphorus by the 
order of the Sultan, some stories going that that magnate and 
power had himself administered the poison. It was a cruel hoax 
and cost her her position as court singer in Constantinople, with 
the pension which that position commanded. Mrs. Mapleson had 
this year been singing in The Fencing Master, and her charming, 
refined and graceful impersonation of the rdles had been highly 
applauded everywhere that she appeared. 

Singers in New York are very much the fad at present, and 
every one who is any one is entertaining them. Both Madame 
Melba and Mademoiselle Calve have been the guests of honor at 
numerous receptions. Thnrlow Weed's granddaughter, Mrs. 
Davison, gave an "at home" for Jeau and Edouard de Resk6, and 
Mrs. Eames-Story has so many old friends here that she has had 
innumerable invitations, which of course she has recently, owing 
to the death of Mrs. 8tory's mother, been obliged to decline. 

I am told that there is a possibility that Massenet's new opera, 
Werther, may be produced during this season. 1 know for a fact 
that de Lucia is studying the role. Quite the most interesting 
concert in a way that New York has heard for many a day was 
the one that introduced the negro pupils of the National Con- 
servatory. The only white person who appeared (aside from the 
conductor) was a little girl of twelve, Bertha Viska, who can put 
many older pianists who call themselves artists to the blush. 
The firmness, truth and purity of her touch are marvelous, her 
sentiment intelligent, and her attack thoroughly well balanced. 
She played with the orchestra a Hungarian rhapsody of Liszt. 
The colored choir of St. Philip's Church sang the chorus while 
Mme. Sistieretta Jones — the black Patti, who has a really beauti- 
ful voice — sang the solo of Inflammatus from the Rossini Stabat 
Mater. The concert was given for the numerous charities which 
are so active in New York just now, and was arranged by Mrs. 
Thnrber and directed by Dr. Dvorak, who, ever since his arrival, 
has been enthusiastic about the musical talent amongst the 
negroes, and whose American Symphony is based upon negro 
melodies. 

One is always meeting old Californians here, who, although 
they have for many years been absent from the Pacific Coast, are 
always eager to hear of old friends in San Francisco, and so I take 
it for granted that the old friends there are equally anxious to 
hear of them. One of these is jovial "Tim" Hubbard, erstwhile 
playfully termed the "Pacer." He has just returned from 
Georgia, where he ha8 a large plantation, and he is as hearty and 
whole-souled, and as young looking as in the golden days of 
bonanzas, when he had no thought, I fancy, of quitting his 
"Western home. In Delmonico's, a few days ago, I met Mrs. 
John Lockwood, who looks very handsome with white hair 
above her very youthful face. Mr. and Mrs. Lockwood have 
been living for a year in Boston, but propose establishing them- 
selves permanently in New York. With her was Mrs. Secor, 
who, long years ago, was accounted one of the very prettiest 
girls in San Francisco. She was Miss Gussie Nolan. She has a 
very beautiful home in Flushing, Long Island, and is the proud 
mother of three handsome children. 

General 0. 0. Howard has gone on a tour of inspection to the 
Dry Tortngas and Fort Taylor. It is reported that Lieutenant 
Commander Heald is about to succeed Lieutenant Mason on the 
New York in Rio Janeiro harbor, as Lieutenant Mason has been 
put on the list of Invalid. Lieutenant Mason will be well re- 
membered in San Francisco. Passe-Pabtout. 




YALE 



/GENTLEMAN5 -SMOKED 

VALE MIXTURE SMOKING TOBACCO 
15 manufdc|ured of |h 
|rown. selected especi 
I brand, regardless of 
\MARBUR(i BROS.. BALTIMORE.! 



I 





UNTIL FEB. 24th 

There -will be offered for sale, at prices 
dealers pay at wholesale, the entire 
stock of the Silverware Establishment 
formerly known as 

Schulz & Fisher, 

414 flarket Street, 

Below Sutter. 
This sale is by order and for account of 

W. Schulz, Esq., 

To close the business. 

HUGH MAULDIN, Manager. 



P.&B 



FRUIT DRYING PAPERS, 
BUILDING PAPERS, 
I ROOFING AND PAINTS. 



PARAFFINE PAINT CO., 116 Battery St. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG & CO., 
The Model American Caterer. 

1206 SUTTER ST., S. F. Telephone 2388. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 

For sale by all first-class "Wine Merchants and Grocers. 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast, 

123 California Street. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 3, 1894 




EVIDENTLY the Executive Committee of the Impromptu Club 
ball have a head for business, or else they are not given to 
" trust" mankind—or, as Hamlet says, " women either." For it 
is distinctly stated that no cards will be issued until the subscrip- 
tion is paid in, and, furthermore, no admittance gained unless the 
card is presented at the door, 

Apropos of bringing your invitation along, a somewhat amusing 
incident occurred at a recent fashionable "function," where a 
man was stationed at the bottom of the steps to prevent farther 
approach to the mansion unless the card of invitation was pro- 
duced. A lady had not thought of bringing hers, and wonld 
have been obliged to turn back, but fortunately her visiting card 
was recognized as a pass-port. 

" What can be the matter with the < swim ? ' " asks an outside 
barbarian. " Has society become so completely unrestrained and 
unconventional that people are in the habit of imposing upon 
hospitality, and going 10 places uninvited ? " It has that appear- 
ance, certainly. 

If the guests at the Fortnightly Club gathering at the Goad resi- 
dence last week were disappointed at not hearing Jim Phelan's 
burlesque on the Hawaiian question, they were more than 
charmed with the clever adaptation of Lord Ullin's Daughter, by 
Dr. Harry Tevis, and the capital manner in which it was handled 
by the different characters of the cast. Miss Ella Goad was, of 
coarse, the star of the evening, her great talent being conspicu- 
ously shown both in acting and singing. 
# * * 

Those who visited Dr. Harry Tevis's excellent work in his 
farce the other evening at the Goads', will be convinced that the 
histrionic honors of the family do not all fall to Hugh. Young 
Milton Latham was not to be laughed at in one sense, and Miss 
McKinstry was also acceptable in what she undertook. 

Now that crests and armorial bearings are so largely supersed- 
ing monograms on carriage panels, a correspondent suggests furn- 
ishing a few for those who are in doubt as to the antiquity or au- 
thenticity of those already in use by them, and will send exam- 
ples upon request. 

It ia said that through the influence of a well-known singer, 
the new ballroom of the De Young residence will be offered to the 
Fortnightly Club for its Eastertide gathering. 

Les extremes se touckent was verified by a glance at the corps of 
assistants surrounding the golden-robed hostess at her successful 
tea lately. " From grave to gay, from lively to severe," all ages 
and all styles. So varied a combination has not been seen this 
season. 

The old girls do not intend to be left behind, apparently, as the 
latest " club " formed Is one for married women to learn how to 
dance the last fashion in the pointing of the " light fantastic." 

To dance well is no doubt a pleasure, not alone to one's self, bnt 
especially to one's partner. Yet it has drawbacks at times. Even 
that master of the art, Ed. Greenway, has sometimes more of it 
than he craves, and he has now double dnty in leading not only 
the fashionable cotillions, but school-girls' germans as well. The 
girls declare that he says, with a sigh, "something too much of 
this." 

On dit, the quiet little nook for "a little game of draw," which 
was the finale to a recent high tea, was not vacated till Sunday 
morning broke. 

* * * 

By the latest gossip from Washington society, it seems that a 
match is on the tapis between the little ex-Persian Minister, 
Truxton Beale, and the pretty young daughter of Silver Senator 
Stewart. Private letters to this Coast say that the young lady is 
the object of Truxton's devoted attention. 

* * * 

Oft dit, the Hobart girls will give a Mardi Gras reception, com- 
bining several unique features sure to be enjoyed by the young 
folks. 

The chatter of the swim is that, notwithstanding the vigorous 
denials of the young man's mater as to her son's engagement, Mr. 
Hicks and Miss Florence Borock will be married soon after 
Easter. Society gossips further declare that there is every possi- 
bility of a reconciliation between fair Miss Emily Hager and her 
long-time admirer, Walter L. Dean. The approaching visit of 
the Dean family to the Coast gives color to this report. 



The increasing extent of fashionable punch-drinking is becom* 
ing alarming. Girls are frequently seen taking their half-dozen 
"sips" between dances; and as to the champagne morning cock- 
tail, called " vitiliser," which has become a feature of the femin- 
ine luncheons after a dance the night before, they, too, are now 
regarded as a necessity by the girl of the period. 
* * * 

The worn nerves and fibres of a veteran belle or matron may 
require stimulant after a night's dissipation; but that the strong, 
fresh young bud standi in need of such things is not for a mo- 
ment to he credited. 

Although the military were a great attraction in the procession 
the day of the opening exercises of the Midwinter Fair, by all 
odds the feature of the parade was the high yellow four-in-hand 
drawn by four beautiful horses, with coachman and footman, 
and inside the Director-General and the Episcopal Bishop- of Cali- 
fornia. The equipage was admired by all, and one pretty girl 
declared, as it passed, "My! won't Mrs. De Young have that 
thing filled with gay parties during the Fairl" Judging by the 
hospitable reputation of that lady, the pretty girl was no doubt 
correct in her surmise. 

The Popular Winter Route. 
If you are going East it will he to your advantage to write to or 
call on the undersigned before arranging for your trip. The " Santa 
Fe Route " is the only line running palace and tourist sleeping cars 
Through to Chicago every day on the same train. Select excursions 
leave every Tuesday, with manager in charge, through to Boston. 
Accommodations and train service unequaled by any line. W. A. 
Bissell, General Passenger Agent, 650 Market street (Chronicle Build- 
ing) San Franc isco, Cal. ^^^^^^^^ 

"DEUTZ & QELDERMANN" 




CflAMPAONt 



3DO 
-3TOTT 
PLAY 
THE 

ib-aust jo ? 



A.SHi'ozrsr ip. STEVEiirs 

Has resumed instruction. 
Studio: No. 26 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

Room No. 8. 



J\)e Bi?st Scores 



ARE MAUE WITH THE 



United $tates <5artrid<£e Qo.'s 

For fine shooting they are simply perfect. \3rCnatjeS. 



UNION GAS AND 
GASOLINE ENGINES. 

1600 IN USE. 

For LAUNCHES, 

PRINTING OFFICES 

PUMPING 

And all purposes where power is required. 

UNION GAS ENGINE GO. 

221-223 First St., 8. F. 
Send for Catalogue. 




I, 1894. 



SAN FRAN MEWS LETTER, 



11 



LONDON NOTES. 

WHEN Crtwc Hall »i< burn., I down lomi ;iui i|0, Lord 
t'rur* • iDlblifi aooolnw rqnal lo lh»t dlapUyad 
•Irollsr occasion hj Shcnd»n. Ho , -,1fr»d • Uble to l>* pl» 
Ihe l»«rn. »nd. culling (or ink an. I a telegraph form, wrote lb a 
to M owlag ammgl ■■■:. R \ — •■ I»r»r tstreel — I'rewe Is 

bnrnlDR. Come and build II up •(•In " In accordance with his 
Instruction., the minute*! detail. ••', iha Hall— a fin.- old Bilta- 
betban structure — were care fully nnoducod. One o( bis pecul- 
iahlies was to talk to himself aloud about the people he was with, 
and this was sometimes very embarrasaing at his ecclesiastical 
dinners. On one occasion the l»ie Mr. Spencer l.yttleton ridiculed 
this failing while at table, whereupon Lord Crewe (who never 
permitted anybody lo take a liberty with him) quietly ordered a 
fly for bis guest, and firmly requeued him to leave the bouse. By 
the death of Lord Crewe the peerage bas become extinct, and it 
is supposed that the Crewe estate." have been bequeathed to his 
nephew. Lord Houghton, who was summoned to his deathbed. 
The late Lord Crewe was only distantly connected with the mil- 
lionaire Bishop wbo held the See of Durham for nearly half a 
ceDtary, and was the last Baron Crewe of another creation. 

Where was it that we read a few days ago of the architectural 
beanty of the Empress Eugenie's residence at Cap Martin? Why, 
it is rather a seaside box than a villa, much less a residence. 
Some French papers spoke in the coarse of this winter of the 
Empress lending it lo the Queen. One might as well think of 
her Majesty and suite Biting into a sixty or seventy pounds a 
year bouse in the suburbs of London. The rooms are few and 
Dot spacious, and mere is only one stranger's room with a garret 
room connected wilh it for a servant. Tbe Duchess of Aosta and 
her maid are welcome to bolh. So would be 1'rince Louis and 
his valet. Prince Victor is not in Ihe high favor that he used to 
enjoy when the codicil of the Prince Imperial's will was fresb, 
and Victor bad not yet been tested by a difficult and conspicuous 
situation and found wanting. 

Mr. Gladstone will have to find a Cambridge man possessed of 
considerable private means to till tbe Deanery of Ely, as the in- 
come Is now altogether inadequate to the 
office, there being a large house and gar- 
dens to maintain, and much hospitality is 
expected from tbe Dean. In the old days 
tbe Deanery of Ely was worth nearly 
£3000 a year, bnt the Church Commission 
reduced the stipend to £1600. Agricultural 
depression bas so greatly diminished the 
income from the Chapter estates that the 
incomes of the Deao and Canons have 
already been cut down twenty-five per 
cent., and this year it is unlikely that the 
Dean will get more than £1000. 

TheDucbeSB of Sutherland is the only 
literary lady entitled to be called " Your 
Grace" in Great Britain. When a child, 
Lady Millicent 8t. Clair Erskine, as she 
then was known, was an active contribu- 
tor to the writing competitions in various 
young people's periodicals. Shortly after 
her marriage she went on a yachting 
tour, and on her return published a vol. 
nme of travels, » How I Went Pound 
the World in My Twentieth Year." 

There are, it would seem, 195,038 aliens 
in England and Wales; of theBe 23,626 are 
Russians, 21,448 are Poles, 20,797 are 
French, 9900 are Italians, and 50,599 are 
Germans. Some, of course, have capital 
to support themselves by means of trade; 
the greater number, and this is specially 
applicable to the Russians and the Poles, 
are obviously men who are competing 
with British workers in the labor market. 



l\fa< ; -th's ■ pearl top" and 
lamp-chimneys 
»1" ii"i break from hi .it 
n .! hundred. 

rin\' arc in. ulf of > 
clt ar gla s, clear as crystal. 
They lit tin- I. mips they are made 

■ Is till' ill. lit. 

Him,: h :> . t,. proper com- 

bustion ; thai makes li.ulu ; they 
improve the light of a lamp. 

nigh. Guo. A. Macbeth Co. 



palo /Mo Stably. 

E. R. MILES, Prop. 

320 O'Farrell St. S. F. 

Two blocks from the Baldwin Hotel. 
Telephone No. 3G15. 



IE8TABLISHED 1862.J 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE, 

J. TOMKINSON, PrOPRIKTOB. 

Nos . 57, 69 and 61 Minna Street, between First aDd Second. 

Through to Natoma street, Nos. 64, 6G and 68. One block from the Palace 
Hotel, also carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, corner Post and 
Stocston streets, San Francisco. Telephone No. 153. 

Fine turnouts kept especially for calling. AIbo rockaways, buggies and 
vehicles of every description at reduced rates. 




The marriage statistics are curious. 
Taking all above fifteen, there are 8,716,363 
unmarried males, 4,851,548 married males, 
and 484,990 widowers, against 8,908,665 
unmarried females, 4,916,649 married fe- 
males, and 1,124,310 widows. Marriage, 
therefore, apparently agrees better with 
women than with men, unless we are to 
assume that a good many of the widows 
are of the grass grassy. 



Few save the poor feel for the poor. — L. 
E. Landon. 

Our enemies are our outward con- 
sciences. — Shakespeare. 



What Our Most Eminent Food Authority Says. 



No. 111. 



OFFICE OF STATE ANALYST, 

BERKELEY, M?Z.". ?.L» i8q 3 ..! 



Certificate or Analysis. 



Dr. J. R. LAINE, See'y State Board of Health 

/ have examined sample rnarked..®.^.?:.}....^.?.?.!?.?.?}. 

Eagle Brand, received. ?®£l;...i?..« i8gl... 

and rebort as follows : 

I have made a bacteriological exami- 
nation of this Condensed Milk, and find it 
remarkably free from any micro-organisms- 
This investigation has shown it to be free 
from any disease germs, and on this account 
I do not hesitate to endorse it as a healthy 
article of food for infants or adults. 



Signed, 



DUPLICATE. 



State Analyst and Prof. Chemistry, (/ 

University of Cal. 




12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 3, 1894. 




The Boon} The condition of the mining market is not very 
Still satisfactory to dealers who jumped in at top prices, 
Lingers. laboring under a wild and unwarrantable exeite- 
ment over nothing. If common sense had prevailed, the mere 
fact that the Rule drift was about to be started, there would not 
have been euch a wild scramble for the shares of Con. Virginia, 
which suddenly became scarce when everybody considered that 
they wanted a few. A little patience would have been exer- 
cised, until the situation at the front, with the work well ad- 
vanced in the drift towards the objective point, warranted the 
investment. If ever there was a case of putting the cart before 
the horse, this was one. Now is the time when the prospect be- 
comes interesting. The drift has been carried into the locality 
where it is expected that ore will be found eventually. A great 
many people can be found ready to make the blunt and off-hand 
assertion that Rule will never find any ore. Sheer assurance is 
admirable and interesting, at the same time showing the extent 
to which some people are ready to go at any moment, carried 
away by an excess of egotism. They know it all every time, and 
even the history of the past has no lessom which might be of 
service to them. A conservative opinion from an authority well 
versed in mining matters would probably incline a little to the 
chances for finding ore at any time when working through a 
highly mineralized section of ground. Con. Cal. -Virginia has pro- 
duced a little ore from time to time since it was first opened up, 
and as it is certain the section where Rule is now working is vir- 
gin, it does not seem at all unreasonable to believe that the 
chances are as good now for a bonanza as they were in the past. 
With the exception of the Gold Hill group, the market outside 
the North End shares has been quiet recently. Belcher shows a 
little strength, and Sierra Nevada has been favored by many 
dealers as a likely investment for a turn. The only assessment 
levied during the week was one of 15 cents on Gould and Curry. 
$ $ $ 

THE bullion output of the Utica mine for the present month is 
expected to be the largest on record. A plaster cast will be 
made of the bar for exhibition at the Midwinter Fair. 
$ $ $ 

Solid The reports of the savings banks of the State have 

Saui'qgs been filed with the Bank Commissioners, and the 
Barjks. statements show a very flourishing state of affairs, 
the total assets amounting in the aggregate to $149,825,048. There 
were four new savings banks incorporated during 1893, and all 
these went into operation in the first half of the year. They were 
the Encinal Savings, at Alameda; Farmers' and Merchants' Sav- 
ings, at Oakland, and the Columbus Savings and Loan and Union 
Trust Companies in San Francisco. There were fifty-seven sav- 
ings banks in full operation in California on January 1st, 1893, and 
sixty on January 1st, 1894. The savings banks, as a rule, had a 
hard time of it for a few months during the middle of the year, 
and this accounts for a decrease in their resources of $7,330,436 
since January 1st, 1893. The way in which these banks weath- 
ered the financial storm which swept all over the country is the 
best evidence of their strength, and the capability of their differ- 
ent managements. Not one of them succumbed under the pres- 
sure brought upon them. All demands for coin were honored, 
and to-day it can safely be said that one and all are in a stronger 
position than they ever were before. Money is again being 
loaned freely, and deposits are increasing rapidly. There is a 
great deal of money still secreted on the outside which was with- 
drawn during a period of excitement. We use the word secreted 
for the reason that the money has certainly not been invested 
here, the possessors belonging to a class who never consider their 
treasure secure unless it is where they can look at it now 
and then and handle it. On the 1st of January, 1894, the sixty 
savings banks of the State held $5,941,891 in ready cash, of which 
$4,521,458 was in the eleven savings b*nks of San Francisco. The 
amount of money held by the fifty-seven savings banks of the 
Stale on the 1st of January, 1893 was $3,816,288. 

9> $ $ 

The People's The report of Attorney-General Hart, based 
fjome upon the careful examination of the atfairs of the 

Bank. People's Home Savings Bank, has again concen- 

trated public attention on the Bank Commission of this State. In 
view of the fact that the People's Home Savings Bank has been 
found by disinterested experts to be not only solvent, but in pos- 
session of assets a long way over and above its indebtedness, the 
vicious attempt made a short time ago to throw the bank into 
liquidation became more glaring than ever. In commenting upon 
the fact that the Commissioners, in their zeal for the welfare of the 
banking community, had wiped out $300,000 of collateral as worth- 
less, which proved to be good, the Examiner says: "That there was 
an idea that in forcing the Savings Bank to follow the Pacific into 
liquidation fat jobs would be provided, has been more than hinted 



at." As it is, the depositors are to be congratulated on their escape, 
and also that the trouble which has obstructed the business of the 
bank turns out to have been purely imaginary on the part of 
Governor Markham's pets on the Bank Commission. Colonel 
R. H. Warfield, who was retained to sift the wheat from the chaff 
among the bank's securities, has bad a long experience as a 
banker in California, and is accredited with being a man pos- 
sessed of uncommonly good judgment and common sense. If 
men of his calibre were selected for such an important position as 
the Bank Commission, there would not be instances to record 
of such a disagreeable nature as those which have transpired 
during the past six months. Colonel Warfield made his report 
under oath, and the statements of all others engaged at the ex- 
amination were also sworn to before turning them over to the 
Attorney-General. 

THE bank also holds, and not included in the above statement, 
twenty-five $1000 bonds of the Los Angeles Electric Road aa 
collateral for any deficiency that may arise on account of any of 
the Pacific Bank transactions. It also holds a guarantee by the 
Pacific Bank, properly passed at a meeting of its Board of Direc- 
tors, legally called, duly signed by its officers under the seal of 
the bank, in re 165 $1000 bonds of the Phcenix City Electric Rail- 
way bonds ; also a similar guarantee in re Los Angeles Electric Rail- 
way bonds, and a similar guarantee in re thirteen mortgage loans 
in San Bernardino and Riverside counties, aggregating $244,283. 
Since the reopening of the bank on August 29, 1893, it has paid 
in full 2567 depositors, many of whom had but small amounts on 
deposit, and other depositors have been paid amounts, so that in 
the aggregate there has been paid out $365,163 15, of which sum 
$84,719 has been paid since this investigation began. In the face 
of the disadvantages under which the bank has labored during 
the past year, the total volume of its business for 1893 reached 
the sum of $12,495,871 58, with depositors numbering 10,654 on 
January 25, 1894. In conclusion, the Attorney-General says that 
the People's Home Savings Bank is solvent, and entitled to con- 
tinue doing business as a bank; also that all matters complained 
of by the Bank Commissioners have been remedied and the ex- 
penses materially reduced. This decision practically gives the 
bank a clean bill of health, and puts it out of the power of any 
ill-disposed persons to interfere with its business in the future. 
Deposits are again piling up with the bank since this decision has 
been rendered, and it is once more in the way of becoming one 
of the most flourishing institutions of its kind in the city. 

$ $ 3 

IN the statement of assets at the close of business on January 
25th, 1894, the report of Colonel Warfield shows as follows: 
Loans on real estate in Oregon and California, $939,370 75; on 
collateral, $102,177 49; loans, commercial, $36,133 53; stocks and 
bonds, $367,000; real estate owned, $288,336 98; safe deposit 
vaults, $18,000; furniture, fixtures, etc., $11,772 44; cash on 
hand and in other banks, $27,354 59; accrued interest on solvent 
loans, $70,632 26. This brings the total assets up to $1,860,777 04. 
The value of the Los Angeles Electric Railway bonds has been 
increased of late, the road being in a far better condition, the 
annual cash increase having been increased by at least $30,000. 
The ability of the road to pay the interest on its bonds now and 
for the future being fully assured, the value of the twenty-five 
$1000 bonds held as security for the $200,000 loaned to the Pacific, 
is now placed at 90 cents on the dollar — a very liberal discount, 
it will be admitted by all who are acquainted with the road and 
its prospects. It is certain that the bonds could not be pur- 
chased for anything like the sum they are appraised at on the 
open market. In arriving at the statement, the Attorney-Gen- 
eral directs attention to the effect that he has not included in it 
the sum of $168,660 62 which is classed as doubtful, but of which 
a large proportion should be realized with a revival in business 
within two years. In addition, the bank owns 3157 shares of 
its capital stock, which is an asset for the purpose of sale, and 
the amount realized thereon would increase the paid-up capital 
to that amount. The excessive expenses have been materially 
reduced, at the suggestion of the Attorney-General, and the regu- 
lar salary list and running expenses have been reduced at least 
$400 per month. 

$ $ $ 
Spriqg The Spring Valley Water Company has filed its 

Valley's annual statement with the Board of Supervisors, 
Profits. showing the name of each water-payer, the residence 
and amount paid for water by each rate-payer during the year 
1893, and also showing its revenue derived from all sources, and 
an itemized statement of expenditures made for supplying water 
during the period named. The receipts for the year from water 
rents of private consumers amount to $1,555,886.03, which, to- 
gether with the city's bill and revenue from other sources, brings 
the total income up to $1,655,339.04. The total disbursements, 
including dividends amounting to $663,500, were $1,694,621.23, a 
loss of $39,282.19 to the company, which is also out of pocket 
$327,343 paid on account of new construction and permanent im- 
provements. The statement will be taken up by the Board of 
Consideration at a special meeting of the Committee on Water 
Supplies on next Wednesday. 



Feb. 8 



SAN FRAX4 ISOO NEWS LETTER. 



18 




" Hetr the Crier" M What the dtTtl art thou?" 
"One that will p!»t the devil, »1r. with you." 



TBLL as not. wen scientific such ft doleful tale as this. 
That diseases most terrific gain diffusion by a kisa. 
Tell ns not in long, long page?. osculation's had its day — 
Twas the bliss of by gone ages. Must we cast it, now, away? 

Doubting doctors' adjuration. Phyllis lightly to me trips; 
If there's death in osculation let me meet it on her lips. 
When a merry maiden fair is, sach advice she will decline, 
Let her sweet obicularis oris lightly rest on mine. 

Yet since kissing surely please?, we, by .Escnlapian art, 
Can prognosticate diseases — soft affections of the heart. 
Kissing was by nature taught us; kiss the maidens as they 

come, 
Though a kiss be ride Piautus Acherontis pabulum. 

IT is a mistake to suppose that because a man occupies 
a pew at church he is to be regarded with suspicion. A great 
many do so from sheer good nature: some to avoid being bored 
by pious neighbors with calls to repentance; some to please their 
wives and daugLters, and a large proportion for lack of occupa- 
tion of a Sunday — in short, there is an endless variety of motives 
which may induce one to appear pious besides actual hypocrisy. 
One of the best men in the ciiy attends church as regularly — and 
about as profitably — as the Assessor visits him. He has been 
heard to remark that he has found it impossible to sleep any- 
where else during sermon time. A lady of our acquaintance, in 
whose goodness we have great confidence, says that Bhe would 
not, for the Kohinoor, miss hearing sinners abused once a week; 
it is her only consolation since her poodle died and life became a 
burden to her. It is thus shown that there are various motives 
that cause people to travel Zionward. Some do from principle. 

THE man who invented photography was doubtless a harmless 
and guileless fellow, upon whose memory we shall cast no as- 
persions. If he deserved anything bad, he probably has it by 
this time. But the men who have improved on photography de- 
serve to have their names handed down to the bitter scorn of a 
nauseated people. Every one likes to see a fine-looking young 
woman, but by the time that she has been taken sitting, standing 
and reclining, with her eyes rolled up and turned down, and peer- 
ing out sideways, with her hat on and her hat off, with side face, 
front face and three-quarter face, with no face at all, but a boun- 
teous supply of back hair, in all sorts of rigs and all sorts af post- 
ures, the thought cannot help suggesting itself to a well-regulated 
mind, that in order to run the gamut, it remains only for her to 
be taken in an inverted position. Therefore, photography is a 
baleful influence when it comes to that. 

HAROLD BOLCE did a wicked and malicious thing when he 
drew the attention of the godly to the heterodox system of 
philosophy taught by Professor Howison of the State University. 
Slyly to teach the truth is all right, but to be caught at it I Shade 
of Bruno I what an awful situation. No wonder the learned but 
modest Professor, filled with visions of inquisitorial vengeance, 
hastened to propitiate the offended clergy by kicking tne imperti- 
nent Bolce off the University grounds. Howison is nothing if 
not consistent: as a philosopher, he has the utmost contempt for 
the Christian theology; as a Christian, he holds philosophy in 
worse dread than a scotched snake does the fire. In his present 
religio-philosophical embarrassment he has, of course, the deep 
sympathy of those Christian scientists and scientific Christians, 
Brers Jordan and Le Conte. 

ATTORNEY MOREHOU8E'8 attempt to quash the indictment 
against Leonard, the man who smashed the Santa Clara Bank, 
on the plea that the Grand Jury which filed the indictment had 
not been legally impaneled, was one of those quibbling devices in 
behalf of rogues that have brought the law so conspicuously into 
contempt. And the natural inference is that Morehouse is afraid 
to have his client brought to trial. Omnia praesumuntur contra 
spoliatorem may not exactly apply to Leonard at this stage of the 
proceedings, in his attempt to evade the issue between himself 
and justice, but Mr. Morehouse may find at least something sug- 
gestive in the maxim. 

TWINS born to Mrs. de Zon in St. Luke's Hospital, Jackson- 
ville, Fla., have been named James Corbett and Charles 
Mitchell de Zon. After this, the pugilists ought to thank the ex- 
pectant parents and stand as godfathers for their namesakes. 
IT is a great shock to a young husband to find out that his wife 
has been praying for him. The inference which he draws is 
that she thinks he might be improved. 



THAT DOV«l-wr1tln|t gentleman. K.d.rrl Loulg 8teven»on. did 
the *onin-l»w ol hit wife an III turn when he rencned Joe 
Strong from Bono! a I . I'nder the law of the inlands, Btrong 

I tliem except by swimming, b* he 
*M » debtor, but lh< • ininenl novelist MUM rruising along and 
ravished Strong from the natlvei. Over a dozen yeara ago Joe 
Btrong bad 10 Pint street. He was fresh from Mnni.li, 

and the people expected something from him. Hi- did 
painting here, but wont to the Hawaiian Islands, where he be- 
came the favorite of the late King Kalakaua, because of his 
capacity to mix punch. Strong trilled with his Majesty and 
with his own brains, for, neglecting bia art, he gave himself up 
to mixing punch, ami from being master of the bowl, was mas- 
tered by ii. He never had much strength, and it was wrong for 
Stevenson to rescue him from bis debts, which were his best 
guardians. A good heart, a weak head and a strong thirst — 
where, in the name of heaven, can any man find a stronger triad 
to lean on for a living? 

LOVE is never practical. Leander was wont to fold Hero in 
his arms, made chaste by contact with five miles of Nep- 
tune's flood. Had be sensibly used a boot, history would be 
minus one briny chapter, and Hero might have been plus a bus- 
hand. In these degenerate days, California is the only place that 
can boast a repetition of legendary heroism, in the person of a 
young sailor, who jumped twice from the deck of the China the 
other day to swim to his lady-love, who stood, all tears, watching 
his departing ship. He, unfortunately, was caught both times 
and brought back. Such unquenchable ardor deserved a more 
appropriate fate than double capture. The blind god never 
makes his followers practical, else this smitten youth would 
have hugged the shore and not the water, even at the risk of 
dimming the brilliancy of our history by one sparkling page. 

EDITOR COLNON, of the Stockton Mail, is a large, fine-looking, 
dignified, broad-minded man, and be has refused to submit to 
the condition of securing a pass to the Midwinter Fair. Recog- 
nizing the fact that the papers give many columns of free adver- 
tising to the enterprise, and the further fact that the rule requir- 
ing an editor to have his photograph affixed to Ms pass presumes 
him to be a scoundrel who would sell or lend the ticket to some 
one, Editor Colnon said to one of the Board of Managers: » I 
will neither submit to the ridiculous rule of furnishing a photo- 
graph by which the gatekeeper may identify me, nor would 1 ac- 
knowledge by such submission that any man shall to assume that 
I am a thief. Whenever I visit the Midwinter Fair I will pay my 
way, preserve my self-respect and remain a gentleman." 

THE tamale vendors are complaining of hard times, and say 
that the sales of the mysterious and highly flavored delicacy 
have suffered a serious decline. To us this is not singular. At 
best, the tamale is an article of food which is eminently calcu- 
lated to fill the average epicure with distrust. This doubt is not 
born of the fear that the alleged chicken may be veal, but that 
the black-hearted compounder of this highly-spiced mystery, this 
Mexican hash, does not pause at veal in his attempt to increase 
the difference between the cost and selling price. It is possible 
that these suspicions are unjust, and that the meat in the corn 
husk is really chicken. But people will, nevertheless, continue 
to have their doubts, especially as long as the contest for the 
captives of the Poundkeeper's rialta continues as lively as at 
present. 

JUDGE HEBBARD is of the opinion that $69,000 is about the 
right amount to pay the San Pablo ranch referees, their law- 
yer gentleman and their surveyor. This opinion is backed by 
the able and disinterested expert testimony of other surveyors, 
lawyer gentlemen and men who might, could, would or should 
be referees themselves some day. But it is the belief of the ranch 
owners, in whom the habit of being bled has become chronic, 
that a great injustice has been done; they are fully convinced 
that the referees, the referees' lawyer gentleman, and the referees' 
surveyor have fairly earned a title to the entire ranch. 

MAN is a strange mixture. He can roar like a lion, bellow 
like a bull, grunt like a hog, bray like an ass, coo like a dove, 
crow like a rooster, cackle like a hen, howl like a fiend. He can 
be cunning as a fox, oily as an eel, harmless as a lamb; he can 
love to-day and hate to-morrow. Poor devil, he may, within 
forty-eight hours, be inflicted with gripes, lumbago, gout and 
yellow fever! But he is plucky, and never dies before his time 
comes. 

THE latest thing in the manufacture of paper is banana peels. 
The journal that uses this paper should have for its motto, 
"Pride goeth before a fall." 

IT is estimated that the cucumber crop is worth $7,500,000 a 
year to the growers. We should like to know what it is worth 
to the doctors. 

A KENTUCKY college has graduated a young lady who can 
speak eleven languages. Fortunately for some one, she is 
not married. 

BRUGGY and his companion, the papers say, are now at sea. 
So are the officers. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 3, 1894. 




THE short visit made by Prince Bismarck to the Emperor Wil- 
liam last week, while it carried on its face all the appearance 
of an opera bouffe victory for the former, was in reality a triumph 
for the diplomatic tact of the latter. For years and years, nnder 
the old Emperor William, Bismarck appeared to rule Germany; 
and he ruled with a rod of iron, too. So skillfully did he obtrude 
Mb strong individuality into the control of governmental affairs 
that to the average German mind it seemed as though he was the 
government and that all the other surroundings of the throne, as 
well as the throne itself, were mere puppets in his hands. Noth- 
ing could be further from the truth than this. Bismarck was un- 
questionably an able man, but he was merely one of the instru- 
mentalities in carrying forward the policy out of which the modern 
empire grew, instead of the central figure around which the policy 
developed. He carried out his own functions, however, in such 
a capable way that most observers got into a habit of thinking 
that he was the creator of the empire and absolutely essential to 
its maintenance and stability. The bulk of the German peo- 
ple fell into this error of regarding the servant as greater than the 
master he served, and it is said that while the old Emperor Wil- 
liam winced under the implied reflection, he tolerated it because 
of his regard for the man whom he had found to be such a loyal 
and useful agent in building the great governmental structure over 
which he dominated. But when the present Emperor ascended 
the throne a different situation arose. The young, untried, and 
decidedly egotistical ruler was restive under the prevailing sus- 
picion that his Chancellor, rather than himself, was the real head 
of tbe empire, and that things would go to the bow-wows if Bis- 
marck were away, That, rather than any material difference of 
opinion upon questions of public policy, was the real cause of 
Bismarck's retirement. Now the young man has demonstrated 
to his people and to the world that he is quite capable of govern- 
ing without Bismarck, and so he has called the old man back into 
favor and made his reception a sort of triumphal fete. This really 
is no advantage to Bismarck, for he has lost beyond the possi- 
bility of regaining the prestige of carrying the empire on his 
shoulders, while, on the other hand, it makes the Emperor more 
popular with that section of the German people who regard the 
ex-Chancellor as a sort of national hero who has been harshly 
treated. The whole transaction shows that tbe new Emperor is 
a pretty shrewd diplomat. Beyond that, it has no significance, 
except that it will placate some dissatisfied political elements and 
make the work of administering domestic government easier. 

Owing to the unpopularity with which tbe new scheme of tax- 
ation has been received in Germany, Dr. Miguel's proposed re- 
formation of the financial system of the empire has been aban- 
doned for the time being. The leading feature in this reformation 
was the abolition of the matricular contributions from tbe States 
to the imperial treasury, and tbe substitution therefor of a scheme 
of direct taxation entirely under tbe control of the imperial au- 
thority. The matricular contributions from the States amounts 
to forty millions of marks per annum, and the removal of this 
source of income at the same time that the new army bill makes 
such a serious inroad upon the public revenue, was found to be 
too great an undertaking. As a result of this change in policy, 
the unpopular duties on wines and tobacco will probably be 
abandoned. 

For the present the danger of trouble in Egypt is over, but the 
causes which really operated to create that danger are still in 
existence. The principal of these is the desire of the old ring of 
court Pashas to get rid of the British control of the public finance3 
in order that they may again have a chance to loot the treasury 
and plunder the felleen. This ring keeps a propoganda at work 
stirring up the national Egyptian sentiment of opposition to 
foreign interference, and in this it is materially assisted by French 
agents. The ring and its French allied seem to have considerable 
influence over the Khedive, but it goes without saying that the 
object of the movement is not to promote the welfare of the 
Egyptian people, but rather to embarrass a regime under which 
the poorest native enjoys protection in the exercise of his jnst 
rights. A well-known and educated Egyptian said recently, in a 
communication published in El Mokattam, an Arabic journal, that 
"Egyptians high and low are well content with theirpresent con- 
dition, except a small section who long for the power which they 
have lost." Continuing, the same writer asserts that " we fear, 
too, that the occupation may cease before we become strong 
enough to resist the oppression of old times." It is also unde- 
niable that under the present control the taxes have been honestly 
collected and applied, and a great many valuable and productive 
public works created and put into operation. The occupation of 
Egypt by a British army has, therefore, been a real and practical 
advantage to the country, and the present fictitious expression of 
deBire for an end of that occupation is not the outgrowth of 
genuine patriotism or animated by an honest regard for political 



liberty and national freedom. In so far as it is a popular desire, 
it fills the definition of a French official, who recently said that 
his endeavors to promote a genuinely patriotic spirit among the 
Egyptians had resulted in exciting mere fanaticism against 
Europeans generally. 

In the slight conflict which took place this week in the harbor 
of Rio Janeiro between our own warships and a portion of the 
rebel fleet, our arms seem to have maintained the dignity and 
rights of tbe national flag in a creditable and vigorous way; but 
the extravagant manner in which the comparatively trivial inci- 
dent has been dished up by our daily press bids fair to make us 
a ridiculous laughing-stock the world over. At the time of writ- 
ing it does not seem possible that tbe incident can have any 
practical effect upon tbe armed conflict which is in progress 
among the Brazilians. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

* * 

.SHIPPING and COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

* * AND 

* « 

'. GENEBAL INSURANCE AGENTS.: 
i * 

Nos- 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco- 
National Assurance Company . - - - - }f Ireland 

Atlas Assurance Company ------ of London 

Boylston Insurance Company ------ of Boston 

Ocean Marine Insurance ------ of London 

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ZH-A-S K,E3^EO"S7-EI3 
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Telephone 207.] [Residence, 1331 Leavenworth. 

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Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Consu'tation Hquts: 4 to 5. 

r\R. R. CUTLAR, DENTIST, 

Removed from Phelan Building, to 
NO. 416 GEARY STREET ----- San Francisco 

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135 Montgomery St, near Bush, San Francisco, Cal. 



'■. 1894. 



.\* FRANCISCO NEWS I ETTER. 



L5 



NOT TO THE MANNER BJRN 



(Bt Hi Vnmon.i 

ONK of lb* atock •ubjects of ihc funny paragraphs Is the rich 
parvenu wbo does not feel at boat with bis butler. Tb« 
world laughs, but lo the pirveim there ft more misery than mirth 
In the truth. There can be nothing more disturbing to one* 
equanimity (ban the knowledge that bis money can buy him 
everything but the respect of his servants. •■ No man i-* a hero 
to bis valet." says the old a-Jat;e. bat for a man to feel that he 
not only has, but deserves, the contempt of bis menials, is a very 
large-sized fly In the apothecary'* ointment. 

Our new rich, of necessity, make many social blunders. 8ome 
of their errors cause them mortification. Tbey know that they 
do not know what Is good form, and they are correspondingly 
uncomfortable for fear they may betray their social ignorance. 
There have been women amo-p the new rich who, recognizing 
tbe fact that their early surroundings were not of such a nature 
as to fit tbera to become society lea.iers. have endeavored to fit 
themselves for their new environment by securing some member 
of the opper circles to act as lady's companion and Bocial mentor. 
In Washington there are many women whose social standing has 
not been impaired by their financial reverses, wbo bave consented 
to act in this corrective capacity for some of tbe new rich and re- 
cently elevated members of the cosmopolitan society. 

But where there is one of the new rich who Is conscious of the 
lack of proper social knowledge, and seeks to make good the de- 
ficiency, there are hundreds who are perfectly content with them- 
selves. They fancy that money is everything. The mistakes 
that tbey make are many, ludicrous, and generally offensive to 
people of good taste. 

In the first place, having been lifted from poverty to affluence, 
tbey seek to dazzle by a grand display of their wealth. They 
graciously permit a few of those who knew them in their humbler 
station to visit them once or twice in their new home, so as to 
dazzle them with their new magnificence. Then they cut them 
entirely, and reach out after greater things. Their efforts, at once 
presumptuous and ill-advised, are more apt to fail than to succeed 
at first. But by a succession of lavish entertainments, good din- 
ners, copious punch bowls and plenty oi champagne, they fre- 
quently find themselves enjoying what is to them a pleasurable 
prominence. 

One of the easiest ways to detect the parvenu is by tbe general 
lack of good taste in the matter of dress. They are overdressed, 
wear diamonds to breakfast, and talk overmuch of money and 
the cost of everything. 

They do not know how to take care of their clothes. A woman 
not to the manner born will don the elegant dress sent home from 
her dressmaker, and wear it till it would shame a self-respecting 
servant. I have seen such, the loopings out of their draperies, 
trimming ripped and hanging loose from the garment, jet orna- 
ments half broken, rips in the seams. The dress is never mended 
or restored in any way to its original shape. The new rich often 
fancy that by a carelessness, real or assumed, in regard to their 
possessions, they are proving their right to be numbered among 
tbe elect. It is the same spirit that moves them to an affectation 
of self-depreciation. " What, you admire this old dres>s ? I just 
hate it," I heard one parvenu say to another, with a look of sat- 
isfaction. 

Those who know the value of money by 
long acquaintance with it, do not need to 
pretend indifference to it, or to over-value 
it. To take care of good things is not an 
evidence of meanness or of parsimony; it 
is only a proof that people are accustomed 
to the best. To take care of a garment is 
in perfect taste. A lady will always keep 
her dress from dragging in the mud of the 
street, even though she have an extensive 
wardrobe. But the new rich, anxious to 
show that money is no object with her, 
will let her skirts slap through tbe mud, 
because she is rich enough to afford a new 
dress every day if she wishes. At the same 
time a lady to the manner born will pre- 
serve her calm dignity should her dress be 
ruined through an accident. A parvenu 
will rage. 

The new rich should have homes of their 
own, for they are to be dreaded as tenants 
or as guests in a hotel. They say, " We 
pay for it," as if that were any reason for 
flinging chairs into the plaster, letting tbe 
wash-basin overflow, striking matches on 
the walls or on the furniture, or for stain- 
ing the carpets and hangings with grease 
or wine. People who have been accus- 
tomed to live in a kitchen are apt to bring 
some of their ways with them into the 
parlor. 

Those not to the manner born show their 
ill-breeding at places of amusement. They 



seem lo think that by talking, laughing and turning tbelr backs 
on the lUg*< ".IK their ability to pay for m many 

theatres and optrti a* they wl»h. They UM their lorgnettes In a 
b<»lt I md obtrnslvt way, * taring others out of countenance. 

Hut it i* in Tr^*- kfitl tbftt IbOM not to tbl manner born 

betray lhem«elvc». In nrdef to glvt the tdea that they have been 
wealthy all their live*, they Minme a manner peculiarly their 
own towards Hi"-.- no) ill tli*»ir tOOtal set. They adopl ft lordly 
air, and cive their orderi «* if they were delivering Kusrdan ukases. 
They affront a servant n* a human being. They seem to imagine 
that a haughty air, a commanding tnnt, ami ruddy expressed dis- 
satisfaction with whatever service is rendered will prove their 
right to belong to those born above their fellows. Or they go to 
tbe opposite extreme. And nre familiar with those who, for the 
lime being, at least, an- their social inferiors. They joke familiarly 
with the servants, gossip with them in the hall, or permit tbesn 
to be familiar in their rooms. There is a wide difference between 
treating servants with consideration, and with familiarity. Noth- 
ing is more difficult than to regain ground once lost through lack 
of dignity. There is a thought In this, even for those who are to 
the manner born. 




Fresh Air and Exercise. 

Getallthat's 

possible of 

both, if in 

need of flesh 

strength 

and nerve 

force. There's need.too, of plenty 

of fat-food. 

Scott's Emulsion 

of Cod Liver Oil builds up flesh 
and strength quicker than any- 
other preparation known to sci- 
ence, 

Scott's Emulsion is constantly ef- 
fecting Curt of Consumption, 
Bronchitis and kindred diseases 
where other methods FAIL. 

Prepared by Scott & Bowne, N. Y. AH dniggistB. 



ZISKA INSTITUTE, 

1604-1G06 VAN MESS AVENUE, San Francisco. 

French, German and English day and boarding school for young ladles 
and children. Next term begins August 3, 1893. For prospectus, address 
MME.B, ZISKA. A. M., Principal. 



More than a Million Ladies after trying one cake have become constant users of BUTTERMILK TOILET SOAP* 

Buttermilk 

Toilet Soap 

contains all of the healing, cooling and soft- 
ening qualities which have always followed 
the use of pure Buttermilk. 

These qualities make it a pleasing soap 
to use, and give the face and hands a beauty 
and clearness that is so prized by Ladies. 

For Sale Everywhere. 

It ij offered at a popular price, and yet 
excels any 25-cent soap on the market. 



BEND 12 CENTS IN STAMPS FOR A 
FULL-SIZE CAKE FOE TRIAL. 



Buttermilk 
SHAVING STICK. 

The Gentleman's DellRht. 
The Purest, Soothing. 

Healing. The Best. 

Sold Everywhere. 
10 Cents for Sample. 




COSMO BUTTERMILK SOAP COMPANY, 

185=187 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO, ILL. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 3, 1894. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Hour is steady; Extras, *3.40@t3.50. Superfine, ?2.40@»2.60. 

Wheat is slack; Shipping, 97VjC.; Milling, $1.02%'g$l. 05 per cental. 

Barley is slack ; Brewing, S2 1 .oc.@92 1 -ic. Feed, 70c.i^72^c. per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, »i.l5@n.22'.£; Feed, |i.00@* 1.10 per ctl. 

Corn. White, WAc. ; Yellow, 85c.@90c. per ctl. 

Rye is quiet, fair demand, 95c. Cement. $2.00@S2.25. 

Hay is steady; Wheat, *10@S14; Oats, J10@tl2; Alfalfa, *8@fl0. 

MillBtuffs, good demand. Bran, $16@$17 per ton. 

Beans, light request, $1.65@$2.10 per ctl. Potatoes, 35c.@75c. per ctl. 

Butter is firmer ; Choice, 2oe.@30c. ; Fair, 17c.@18c. 

Cheese, light stock, 10c.@13c. Eggs, free supply, 25c. 

Honey, Comb, 10c.@12c. ; Extracted, 4c.@5c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth 51.2>@$1 50. Beeswax is steady, at 22c.@23c. 

Fruit — all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Hides are steady ; Dry, 5c.@6c. Wool is in lignt demand at 7c.@12c. 

Provisions move otF steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 7^c. 

Coffee sluggish at 20c.@22c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is plentiful; large stock. Nuts find ready sale. Hops, 15c.@18c. 

Quicksilver is nominal at $30 per flask. 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws and Refined. White, 4?ic.@6c. 

The semi-weekly collection day was on Monday, the 29th ult., 
and payments were very generally met with their usual prompt- 
ness. The outlook for an active business the coming spring is 
cheering to our merchants. Our city is rapidly filling up with 
guests from all parts of the world. Our Midwinter Fair is a great 
attraction and is giving employment to a vast number of artisans 
and other workers; ail is life and activity. 

The 0. &. O. sttnr. Belgic, 24 days from Hongkong, via Yoko- 
hama 14J day 8 . had for cargo 3260 bags 8ugar, 1158 pkgs. Tea, 
81,304 mats Rice, 864 cs. Oil, 39 pkgs. Silk Goods, 35 rolls Mat- 
ting, 4000 pkgs. Mdse. ; also, 840 pkgs. Mandarin Oranges from 
Japan; in transit, for Overland, 669 pkgs. Tea, 1196 pkgs. Eaw 
Silk, 53 pkgs. Silk Goods, 909 rolls Matting, 64 pkgs. Curios; 
also, for Central and South America, 275 pkgs. Mdso. 

Imports from Hawaii The bktne. S. G. Wilder, 16 days from 

Honolulu, brought 17,201 bags Sugar. Schr. Anna, 17 days from 
Kahului, had 5067 bags Sugar; per Consnelo, from Eahului, 6533 
bags Sugar; per C. D. Bryant, from Honolulu, 24,692 bags Sugar, 
250 sks. Coffee, 77 bales Wool, etc.; bktne. Planter, 19 days from 
Honolulu, with 15,900 bags Sugar; schr. John G. North, from 
Mahukona, brought 10,354 bags Sugar. 

Exports to Hawaii. — The bark Harvester, for Hilo on the 26th 
tilt., had produce value $15,297, consisting in part of 288 bbls. 
Flour, 800 bales Hay, 1410 sks. Bran, 150 bbls. Lime, etc. Bark 
8. C. Allen, for Honolulu, had Mdse., value $26,403, consisting in 
part of 730 bbls. Floor, Barley, Oats, Beans, etc. To Kahului, 
per Lizzie Vance, Mdse. valne $11,300. 

Mexico, per 8. S. St. Paul on the 26th ult., Mdse. value $35,966, 
say 100 asks. Quicksilver, 49 pkgs. Machinery, 6000 galls. Wine, 
43,500 ft. Lumber, Coffee, Rice, Butter, Cheese., etc.; also, 46,575 
lbs. Tallow and 8364 lbs. Coffee. 

Coffee imports in 1893, 17,038,869 lbs., value $2,874,825; 1892, 
22,444,437, value $3,801,670. 

Sugar imports in 1893, 351,953,1! 
276,484,858 lbs., value $7,688,121. 

Tea imports in 1893, 6,139,908 lbs. 
852 lbs., value $940,097. 

Rice imports 1893, 35,112,146 lbs. 
287 lbs., value $1,107,605. 

Grain Charters Br. ship Langdale, 1966 tons, Wheat and 

Mdse. to U. K., Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk. Italian ship 
Caterina Accame, 1711 tons, Wheat to U. K., etc., as above, £1 
6s. 3d., direct port Is. 3d. less. Ger. ship Reinbek, 1188 tons, 
Wheat U. K., etc., as above £1 6a. 6d. net. Br. bark Duke of 
Argyle, 960 tons, Wheat from Tacoma, TJ. K , etc. Br. ship 
Iverna, 2200 tons. Wheat from Tacoma, U. K., etc. Br. ship 
General Roberts, 1914 tons, Wheat to U. K. and Continent, £1 
6s. 3d., direct port £1 5s. Brit, ship Graucns, 1999 tons, Wheat 
or Barley to U. K., Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk, £1 6s, 3d. ; direct 
port £1 5s.; Brit, ship Othmarschen, 1787 tons, Wheat to TJ. K., 
Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk, £1 6s. 3d.; direct port £1 5s.. 

Lumber for Africa. — Bark Harry Morse, 1313 tons, Lumber 
from Puget Sound to East London, Africa, £3. 

The Orient The P. M. 8. S. China sailed hence on the 30th 

ult. with Treasure, $324,367, all for Hongkong, except $80,000 
Silver Bullion to Japan. Her cargo for China, valued at $41,036, 
say 8981 bbls. Flour, 1903 lbs. Ginseng and Produce; to Japan, 
1100 bbls. Flour, 61 pkgs. Leather and produce, value $14,218. 

Liverpool — Ship Dominion, thence 144 days, had for cargo 
22,485 bags Salt, Chemicals, Iron and general merchandise. 

Central America The stmr. St. Paul, hence, had cargo valued 

at $61,480, say 2146 bbls. Flour, 46,100 lbs. Malt, etc. To Mexico, 
Mdse., value $3600; to Panama, Mdse., value $7890. 

Lumber for Sydney — The bk. Ophir, hence on the 30th ult., 
carried 475 M. feet Lumber, 1150 Doors, 130 M. Shingles, etc., 
value $15,262. 



ZB-A-HSTIECS. 



! lbs., value $11,046,943; 1892, 
, value $936,175; 1892, 6,155,- 
, value $699,069; 1892, 48,308,- 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVIN6S UNION. 

Northeast Corner California and Sansome Streets, 

Formerly Occupied by Bank of Wells, Fargo & Co. 

Beanch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, Jnne 30, 1893 $28,058,691 OO 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,599,434 OO 



DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, iresiaent; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas, 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
Sarties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
ank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge Is made 
for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6 :30 to 8. _^__^ 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST CO. 

Paid-up Capital, 91,000.000. 

Corner Montgomery and California Streets, San Francisco. 

J. D. FRY, President HENRY WILLIAMS, Vice-President 

J. Dalzell Brown. Secretary and Treasurer. 

This company is authorized by law to act as Executor, Administrator, 
Assignee, Receiver or Trustee. It ia a legal depositary for Court and Trust 
Funds. Will take entire charge of Real and Personal Estates, collecting 
the income and profits, and attending to all such details as an individual 
in like capacity could do. 

Acts as Registrar and Transfer Agent of all Stocks and Bonds. 

Receives deposits subject to check and allows interest at the rate of two 
per cent per annum on daily balances. Issues certificates of deposits 
bearing fixed rates of interest. 

Receives deposits in its savings department from $1 upwards, and allows 
the usual ratea of interest thereon. 

The rate of interest on Term Deposits for six months, ending June B0, 
1893, was at 5 per cent per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits 4 1-6 per 
cent per annum. 

HLMS SAFES inside its burglar-proof vaults at prices from $5 per 
annum upwards, according to size. Valuables of all kinds may be stored 

WILLS DRAWN AND TAKEN CARE OF WITHOUT CHARGE. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 1,390,000 

Southeast corner Bush and Sansome Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE 60 LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES — Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops. Nanaimo, 
and Nelson— British Oolumbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Tacoma, 
Washington. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK— Merchants Bank of Canada; CHICAGO— First National 
Bank; LIVERPOOL— North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British 
Linen Company; IRELAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO— London Bank of 
Mexico; SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank of Mexico and South America; 
CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; 
AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of Australasia and Commer- 
cial Banking Company of Sydney, Ld. ; DEMERARA and TRINIDAD 
(West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $8,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (Jan. 1, 1893) 3,276,486 60 

WM. ALVORD, President. 

Thomas Brown Cashier | I. P. Moulton, 2d Assistant Cashier. 

8. Pbentiss Smith, Asst. Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

NEW YORK— Agency of The Bank of California. BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank. LONDON— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild <!i Sons. PARIS— 
Messrs. De Rothschild Preres. VIRGINIA CITY (Net.)— Agency of The 
Bank of California. CHICAGO— Union National Bank. ST. LOUIS— Boat- 
men's Bank. AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND— Bank of New Zealand. 
CHINA, JAPAN and INDIA— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world . 

Draws direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake, 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, 
Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK. Limited. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 I Capital paid up 2.450,000 

Reserve 490,000 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 73 Lombard St. , E . C 

Portland Branch. 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1156 Pacific Avenue. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV PRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan A Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said citlesand 
all parts of the world. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street. San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND | 1,770,000 00. 

Deposits Jan 2, 1884 30,018,739 24 

Officers— President, EDW. KRUSK ; Vice-President, B. A. BECKER; 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGER8 ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN; Secretary, GEO. TOUBNY; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. MULLER. Board of Directors— Edw. Kruse, George H. 
Eggers, O. Schoemann. F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. 
Simon, Ign. Steinhart, Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 



Feb. 3 f 1894. 



BAN 1'K.YV ISCO NEWS 



17 




JOSEPHETA.— Wilt (WVr, in tht (TiiV 



GREAT black eyes with looks 00 leader 
That they seem almost to weep; 
Hand that's taper, hrowo and slender 
Shades them peering up the steep, 
From the " dobey " on the mesa. 
Where the sun forever shines, 
'Long the foothill, where the gazer 
Sees amid the tangled vines 

And the crooked manzanita, 
Bu Chiquita! 
La bunita. 

There's a little Mexic maiden, 

Golden-haired and eyes of blue, 
With the summer tlowers laden 

Climbing down from where they grew. 
Dusky-haired and dark-eyed mother — 

Though mayhap the question's bold — 
Whence those eyes of some one other. 
Whence the ahining locks of gold? 
Tell me, handsome Josepheta. 
Of Chiquita, 
La bonita. 

Ah! I see yon caballero, 

Hiding thither down the trail — 
Now he lifts his broad sombrero, 

Shouts the 8axon's hearty hail. 
And the flax-haired caballero 

Has Chiquita's eyes of blue, 
Shaded by his slouch sombrero- 
Pretty answer that is, too, 

For the handsome Josepheta, 
And Chiquita, 
La bonita. 



NOCTURNE.— London World. 
(A te, donna, che sai.) 



Last night I dreamed that you were dead, 
And yet that o'er me, as 1 slept, 

You bent your gold-encircled head, 
Of not one siren charm bereft; 

And when I spake yon made no sign, 

Bat with keen, cold, unchanging eyes, 

Gazed pitiless deep into mine, 

Brimming with love's glad, sweet surprise; 

And drew my longing soul from me 
With one persuasive, cruel kiss, 

That thrilled me, as the moon-swept sea 
Ai tide time in each lone abyss. 

Then, when I woke free from your thrall, 
The wind was sighing o'er the mere, 

Dawn tinged with rose the dusky wall, 
A missel-thrush sang full and clear; 

The world seemed young and glad and gay, 
And for a while, I could forget 

Your proud pale face, the fated day, 
When, evermore estranged, we met. 



A PRINCESS OF JAPAN.— Mary M. Scott, in LippincoWt 



Fragile, waxen dream of woman, 
Cold, inscrutable, unbuman! 
Ivory skin too dense for veining, 
Hair as deepest shade remaining, 
Tiny lips gold-tipped with silence, 
Sealed to girlhood's gay beguilance. 

I can dream that men may love thee; 
But will all their loving move thee? 
Can a heart sincere and tender 
Kest beneath that garment's splendor? 
Rich with gold the gorgeous sheathing 
Cold above thy quiet breathing. 

Thou art made of dew and shimmer 
Of the moon where snow-crestB glimmer, 
Wrought of pure and scentless flowers, 
Stilled with hush of starlit hours. 
Deep the natal mystery gleaming 
T Neath thine eyelid's heavy dreaming. 



JB-A.JST KS. 



WELLS, FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

H. V. « nrii.r ^ tin- nn«l niim.t SLrrflJi. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $6,250,000.00 

JohnJ Vai.astise President. 

gOM*8.Klira Manager. 

H.WAMWOETB , ra.hlor. 

F. L. LirXAN Assistant Cashier. 

BRANCHES. 

Ncwlork CltJ H. B. PARSONS, Cashltr. 

Salt Lake City J. E. DOOLY, Cashier. 

HI RECTORS: 
John J. Valentine, Ben]. P. i lii-n.v, Oliver Kldrldec, Henry E. Hunting- 
ton. HomcrS. KIiik, Geo. E. Gray, John J. McCook, Chos. F. Crocker, 
Dudley Evans. 

"IuFfI RSf NATIONAL BANK. 

IV. W. corner Sansome anil Bush Streets). 
Established 1870. u. 8. Depositary. 

CAPITAHPAID UP) .11,600.000 

SURPLUS 1700.0001 UNDIVIDED PROFITS $186,000 

8. O. MURPHY President IE. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT.. .Vice-President I GEO. W.KLINE Ass'tCashlor 

DIRECTORS: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins, S. G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffltt. 

ThomasJennlngs, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 
SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 
JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 
Safes to rent from ?5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control ol 
the renter!, for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8a.m. to6 p.M. 

MUTUAL SAVIN6S BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearnr Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES D. PHELAN, 8. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors — James G. Fair, Edward Barron. John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James D. Phelan, James Moffltt, 8. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader 
and Frank J. Sullivan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
securities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deporits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK. Limltod. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up 11,600.000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 8 Angel - ourt, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seli man A Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, Bells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
worlu. 3ends billB for collection, loans money, buys and Bells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART i -„- aT , OM „ 

P.N.LILIENTHAL.l Mana &6™ 
A. L. SKLIGMAN, Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. w. Cor. Sansome and. Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 | Paid UpCapltal $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $760,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), No. lOWall 8t.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17Bonle 
vard Polssoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
merclal and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, I „„„„„„„ 
C. ALTSCHUL, i Managers. 

THE SATHER BANKIN6 COMPANY. 

Capital 81,250.000. 

Successor to Bather 4 Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 
J AMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. L. I. COWGILL, Cashier. 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, "5Vm. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS: 

William Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H . Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O.D.Baldwin A. K. P. Harmon, 

Adam Grant W. 8. Jones J . B. Randol. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets, 

PAID-UP CAPITAL 31.000,000. 

DIRECTORS: 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. B. POND. 

WM. H. CROCKER PRESIDENT 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President. 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY- 

No. 18 Geary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November 24. 1869 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President | ERNST BRAND Secretary 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LEUTER. 



Feb 3, 1894. 



^^Wl4iJll«^^^^^^ 



THE Brighton Htrald states that in a local collection of pottery 
there is a large mug, dating from the last century, called the 
" Staffordshire Beerometer," upon which is a representation of 
a tube of mercury, with the following degrees of intoxication 
and Bobriety against it: 50, Drunk as a lord; 45, Drunk; 40, Dis- 
guised in liquor; 35, As sober as a man ought to be — knows 
what he is about; 30, Drunk without but sober within ; 25. Fresh 
— worse for liquor; 20, Market fresh — bad had a drop; 15, Con- 
sarned in liquor — bad had a drink; 10, Sober as a judge; 5, Sober 
as I am now — had had five quarts among three of us; 0, Sober; 
5, Had nothing since breakfast; 10, Had nothing to-day. The 
" Beerometer" does not exhaust the various states; a teetotaler 
might continue the descending scale with advantage, while there 
are not few policemen who could not supply higher degrees than 
"50." 



It was in 1547, 1 Edward VI., that a statute was made that 
" a runagate servant or any one that was idle three days, be 
brought before two justices of the peace, and marked V with a 
hot iron on the breast, and adjudged the slave of him who 
brought him for two years. He was to take the said slave and 
give him bread, water or small drink, and refuse meat, and cause 
him to work by beating, chaining or otherwise, and if within 
that space be absented himself fourteen .lays, he was to be marked 
on the forehead or cheek by a hot iron with an S, and be his 
master's slave forever. A year's desertion was felony, and pun- 
ishable by death." This method of treating the "roughs" of that 
day was vigorous, but failed in its object. The Act would not 
work, and so died a natural death, although only formally re- 
pealed in the present century. 

An old tome credits Queen Elizabeth with being the first woman 
to wear silk stockings. Here is the story: In the second year of 
Queen Elizabeth, 1560, her silk woman, Mistress Montague, pre- 
sented Her Majesty as a New Year's gift with a pair of black 
silk stockings, the which, after a few days wearing, pleased Her 
Highness so well that she sent for Mistress Montague and asked 
her where she could help her to any more. Mistress Montague 
answered, » I made them very carefully on purpose only for 
your Majesty, and seeing these please you so well, I will pres- 
ently set more in hand." " Do so," quoth the Queen, " for in- 
deed I like silk stockings so well, because they are pleasant, fine 
and delicate, that henceforth I will wear no more cloth stock- 
ings." 

An act of Parliament was passed in the reign of Edward III 
prohibiting any one from being served at dinner or supper with 
more than two courses, except upon some great holidays therein 
specified, in which he might be served with three. This Act has 
never been repealed, and is, therefore, still in force. 

A St. Petersburg editor has hit upon the notion of printing his 
journal on paper suitable for making cigarettes. It is said that 
its circulation has been largely increased by this means, as the 
Russians are largely given to smoking cigarettes, which they 
make themselves. 



The average weight of a woman's hair is stated to be fourteen 
ounces. The hairs on the heads of a blonde, brown-haired, black- 
haired and red-haired woman have been lately counted. The 
number on each was as follows: 140,419, 109,440, 102,962, 83,740; 
each crop was about the same weight. 



A short time ago a man died at Frankfort-on-the Oder, and 
left his fortune of about £4500 to the German Emperor. His near- 
est relations, who received nothing, sent a petition to the Em- 
peror, and one of them has now received the sum of £500. 



At Cotta, in Saxony, the names of persons who did not pay 
their taxes last year are printed and hung up in all the restau- 
rants and saloons in the city. The proprietors dare not serve 
those mentioned on the lists with food or drink. 

Many of the South Sea Islanders believe that Paradise can be 
inherited only by persons of perfect physical form. Where this 
belief prevails, a man will die rather than submit to an amputa- 
tion. 



The half tone engravings, which for a long time have been a 
popular and artistic leature of the News Letter, are from the studio 
of Bolton & Strong, of 430 Pine street. The firm, which give par- 
ticular attention to this line of work, are at the head of their pro- 
fession upon the Pacific Coast. Their half-tone engravings are un- 
excelled in the West. They have far more than a local reputation, 
being widely known as excellent artists and artisans. 



X3srSTJE.-A_35TC!Ei. 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company, 
OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL. $1,000,000. | ASSETS, $3,000,000. 
AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., 
Gen'l Managers. 

40 to 4,4 PINE STREET, NEW YORK. 



HAZARDS INSURED. 

EMPLOYEES AND PUBLIC LIABILITY, 
BOILER EXPLOSION, 
GENERAL CASUALTY, 
ELEVATOR ACCIDENT, 
SPRINKLER LOSSES. 
GENERAL ACCIDENT, AND 
FIDELITY. 
BOLGER & BURLING, General Agents. 

■408 California Street. 

William Macdonald, Manager. D. E. Miles, Aas't Manager. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

OP LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $10,63 7,50 

Net Surplus Over all Liabilities 3,116,305 

315 Montgomery Street, - San Francisco 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORTCOSTA, California. 

storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Roard. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 
Office of the Company, 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-California Bank. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OP HAMBURG, GERMANY. 

Geo. Leonard and H. Danker, Managers p. t. for the Pacific Coast 

Branch, 

220 Sansome St., S. F. 

Capital $1,500,000.00 

Invested in U. S 640,346.23 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
332 California St., S.F.,Cal. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO- of New York., 
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO.. of Toronto. 

A. R. GURREY, Manager. | C. A. STUART, Asst. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 
BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL ... »6,700,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

Wo. 316 California Street San Franclteo 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, 

413 California Street, San Francisco 



Feb. 3. 1894. 



san n:\M ta o sews u 



19 



&5UNltf;AMS 




OF all secure methods of packing, the following mast hare been 
moat effectual. The manager of a menagerie having died, his 
relatives were informed that hli remains would be sent to them 
on a certain day. uoom panted by one of the keepers. In due imu- :\ 
large box arrived, but when it was opened it was found to contain 
nothing but the carcase of an enormous lion. The man accompany- 
ing the case was at once InterrocaU -i. " How fa this ' " uked an iii- 
dignant relative. " We were told to expect the body of the manager, 
ami instead of that this lion has arrived." ■' That's just it," said the 
man. " Him's the feller what eat him. The managers insiile." 

—English Paper. 
A (CADES of uncertain years 
Beside her cozy tire >at. 
And spoke her modest hopes and fears 
In confidence unto her cat: 

" A man may be a brute, 'tis true, 
A wicked wretch an' a' that, 
But .Robert Burns his business knew— 
' A man's a man for a' that.' " 

.Satan frowned. " Are you one of those fellows," he sternly de- 
manded, '* who are still circulating the fire and brimstone reports? " 
The soul trembled and stood confessed. "And you really think," 
the prince of darkness sneered, "that we have no more effective 
methods of torture than were in vogue a thousand years ago ? " The 
soul was silent. "Here, Lucifer." called his majesty, impatiently, 
"show the gentleman through the painless dentist and violin-taught- 
in-15-minutes departments." — The Dentht. 

" As old. crippled woman whom I knew in Leamington, England." 
writes a correspondent, "used often to amuse me by her original 
ideas and speeches. Speaking of Shakespeare one day, I said I would 
like much to visit Stratford-on-Avon. ' Law ! ' said she with much 
scorn. 'Who was he? On'y a plow-boy, and he was never thought 
nothin' of till them Americans came over and took him up.' " 

— Boston Transcript. 

Judge— Am I to understand, madam, that you want to withdraw 
Your suit for divorce ? Woman— Yes, y'r honor. Judge — But you 
Lave charged that your husband neglected you, starved you, and 
maltreated you most shamefully. Woman — If you please, sir, I have 
just found out that the young woman I saw him with last week was 
his sister. — New York Weekly. 

Mr. Sinnicle had just been reading of the marriage of a young 
woman with money to a man with a foreign ancestry. "Modern 
matrimony," he remarked, " makes me think of the modern novel." 
" In what respect ? " " It's a combination of striking title, gilt-edged 
binding, and a mighty poor piece of work after all." 

— Washington Star. 

He — Do you know that as long as I have known you, I have never 
seen you dressed in white. She — Indeed! Are you, then, so partial 
to the color? He— Not exactly that; but whenever I see a girl dressed 
in white, I am always tempted to kiss her. She— Will you excuse 
me for a quarter of an hour ? — London Topical Times. 

Knowledge of the World.— Mrs. De Style— I wish you wouldn't 
play with those strange little girls. I don't know who or what they 
are, and their mothers may have the impudence to call on me next. 
Small Daughter— Oh , no, their mothers will never bother us. They 
live in better houses than we do. — London Spare Moments. 

Here is a copy of a bill from the French Fair at the London 
Aquarium: "Ladies and Gentlemen, Nougat David. The best manu- 
facture. Selling wholesale price very cheap scertificated by the Po- 
lice Station. Fabrication, 35 Rue d'Artois deja tres connu a Bou- 
logne-sur-mer (France)." 

Mr. Chugwater — I'm hungry sMU, but the biscuits are all gone, 
there's no more cream for the coffee, and the steak is all gristle. Sa- 
mantha, you'll die of enlargement of the heart I Mrs. Chugwater— 
I don't know, Josiah. I've never been exposed to it in this house. 

— Chicago Iribune. 

"Did you see Freddie Twiggins on New Year day 1" asked one 
girl. "No," replied the other; " I was told, though, that he — er — 
that he had skates on." "Skates," repeated the other; "skates 
doesn't begin to express it. Those were snow shoes." 

—Indianapolis Journal. 
. Tommy — Paw, what does this mean, " I have never seen the right- 
eous forsaken nor his seed begging bread?" Mr. Figg— Urn — er — I 
guess it means the fellow who has to beg has no right to be deemed a 
Christian. — Indianapolis Journal. 

Her Father (sternly)— Genevieve, you are engaged to some young 
man. Herself— Oh, father, how did you discover my secret? Her 
Father— The gas bill for last quarter is suspiciously small. 

— London Topical Times. 

The Romance of a Young Man. 
The carvings on the chalk walls of the Pommery cellars have a 
romantic history associated with them. A young artist from Paris, 
named Henri de Catinat, finding himself utterly destitute one day, 
applied to Madame Pommery for assistance. That good lady, whose 
nature was as generous as the wine that bears her name, treated him 
with the utmost kindness and hospitality. Before leaving the chatean 
the artist begged to be allowed to express his gratitu te in some way 
and spent a day in the Pommery cellars, leaving behind him the 
artistic carvings which are to-day the admiration of the best Euro- 
pean connoisseurs. The whereabouts of the artist have been un- 
known since. — Figaro-. 



kin'i 1 
It \* here Ui 



itc ntni aUentii ■ m from 

rket affordl, •"iii- 

. ■ of the 
mi tier street, an- always sort "f finding, 
• take their imu beona and meals. 



X -DTBTJ li-^ISrCIE . 



PACIFIC I^EI ^ -A-DRT]VIE!asr , I , 

6UARDIAN ASSURANCE CO.. SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. r>. 18X1. 
Paid-up Capital, • ■ ■ I 5.000,000. 
Caah AnoU, ta,m,in. 



OF LONDON. 

Founded a. d. 1710. 

Caah A.ecU, 110,044,712. 

Aatota In America, - ■ - I2,M0,86S. 



Wl. J. MSDKRK. SriTI »«nt, SM Kamome St.. San Franmto. Cal. 



THE NEW EN6LAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets I19.724.S38.4S. 

President. BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vlce-Pres., ALFRED D. FOSTEE 
HENRY K. FIELD, Qeneral Agent, 
Mills Building Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Co. Limited, of London. 
The Imperial Insurance Co. Limited, of London 

WM. SEXTON, K. C. MEDCEAFT, 

Manager. 8ub-Manager 

Pactnc Branch, 221 Sarmome St., s. F. 

SWAIN & MPRDOCK, City Agents. 

THE 



FIRE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OP MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CEAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BA8LB. OF ST. GALL. OF ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HAKEY W. 8TZ, Qeneral Agent, 

410 California St. , San FranciBCO, Cal 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subset/bed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 0,124,067.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street. San Franclico. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NKW TOKK, 

Capital Paid Up % 500,000 

Assets 8,181,758 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,625,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 
City Office— SOI Montgomery St. General Office— 401 Mont'g.St. 

AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, 6EEMANY. 
Established 1825. 
Capital, $2,260,000. Total Assets, $6,854,653.65 

United States Department: . 204 SANSOME ST., SAN FEANCI8CO. 
VOSS, fOSBAD A CO.. general Managers. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Eoyal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1886.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Street. 
^__ G EO. F. BBAST, Manager 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH AMERICA 

ja^-Oldest Stock Fire Insurance Company in the United States. 

Capital Fully Paid $3,000,000 

OF PHILADELPHIA, Pehn. 
Officb Pacific Dbpabtmknt— 

412 California Street, San Francisco. 
JAMES D. BAILEY, Qeneral Agent. 



20 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 3, 1894 . 



*iVi« Jt't£ -•* 




WE saw a very pretty gown the other day of black crepon — 
the good quality which will last a long time and not pull 
into shreds. It was made for a woman who has a very pretty 
figure, so it was very simple, with a perfectly plain front, gath- 
ered at the neck and drawn into the long-waisted belt. Over the 
shoulders aDd down the front and back ran two wide black moire 
ribbons meeting at the waist line. The belt was of wide moire, 
and was fastened in the back by a large silver filigree buckle. 
The skirt was perfectly plain, except for an end of moire which 
ran slanting down the left side toward the front, and terminated 
about eight inches from the waist in a large moire chou or rosette. 

The extra waist of silk or satin or calico is a thing of beauty. 
It is a very pretty thing to have for the theatre, for dinner, to 
wear under a heavy jacket, to wear in the house instead of a neg- 
lige and for traveling. For the latter use, those of dark colors 
and of plain silk without any trimming are the most suitable, but 
for the hoQse and for ordinary wear, bright colors, such as plaids 
or reds, are suitable. Of course the delicate shades for the thea- 
tre and for receptions are without number, and to make skirts to 
go with these, black silk, in which is a small figure or flower, is 
a pretty material. 

For young girls these bright waists are charming, but for older 
women, those combined with black lace or trimmed with jet are 
more appropriate, richer and much dignified. A theatre waist of 
deep crimson silk, worn the other evening by a fashionable 
woman, had a jabot of soft black lace and a high collar of the 
same. The waist was encircled by a gold and begemmed girdle of 
filigree. With this was worn a tiny capote of jet and red satin. 



A pretty dinner gown worn the other night by one of the pret- 
tiest young New York matrons was of yellow silk, in which there 
was a flash of grey and a gleam of pink — a moving opal of silk. 
It was made decollete with a short bertha of old point lace on 
either side in front, caught up with bows of white satin and 
flame color the shade of the gleam of pinkish red in the silk. 
The waist was girdled by a folded band of flame colored satin. 

Plumed hats are the very latest thing in midwinter hats, and 
are rather graceful, if also a bit eccentric. One is of black satin, 
the under brim faced with violet felt or velvet and the stiff, stand- 
ing up bow and loops of violet satin and heliotrope velvet. With 
these a tight fitting coat of black satin, with a shoulder cape of 
violet velvet and a boa of black ostrich tips to match those in the 
hat was worn. 

As was the case last winter, wbite satin is still a favorite ma- 
terial for evening wear. White ruoire" is much employed, and 
brocades, both in white and colors, are worn by both maid and 
matron. Trains are so undesirably in the way at dances that 
both women and men will rejoice that the fashionable evening 
gown is allowed to touch the ground and no more. 

One of Worth's latest ideas for evening gowns shows a skirt 
of thick ivory satin, each seam ripped up to the knee and filled 
in with plaitings of fine lace. At the top of each plaiting is a posey 
of artificial flowers. The corsage, veiled with lace, has volumin- 
ous satin sleeves, strapped with satin and edged with a fine line 
of silver spangles. 

Girls are wearing tulle again this winter at dances io white, 
black and pale colors. There seems to be quite a fancy for tan 
and chestnut tints, and tbey certainly are effective when seen 
among the pale blues, greens, yellows and mauves, which are the 
more usual choice. 

Many black tulle dresses are worn, especially by very young 
girls, of brilliant or dainty coloring, and by matrons still young 
enough not to have the black add to their age, who have splendid 
jewels to exhibit, since nothing so well displays fine diamonds. 

Many of the new evening gowns are made with a bodice or 
sleeves of velvet or brocade in a different color and material from 
the skirt. Bodices of brocade are worn with skirts of silk, satin, 
or some light and thin material. 

Fur is a favorite accessory of evening gowns — the whiteness of 
the ermine, the rich brown of sable, the soft grey of the chinchilla. 



The fitting of a gentleman's clothes is even more essential than 
their quality, but Colonel J. M. Litchfield, 12 Post street, enjoys his 
popularity as a tailor by reason both of his perfect fitting and the 
nigh quality of his goods. His reputation has been so well earned 
that none could think of questioning. 



WlWR. 



Qlcarapee Sale 

NOW IN PROGRESS. 

STARTLING 
REDUCTIONS 

IN 

EVERY 
DEPARTMENT. 

See daily papers for particulars. 




Murphy Building. 




MRS. W.E.SPENCER, 



HAIR 

STORE. 



202 ELLIS ST., NEAR MASON. 
Elegant Manicuring and Hair Dressing Parlors. 
Pacific Coast wholesale and retail agent for 
ISABEL CAVSIDIT'S superior toilet preparations 
CREME BEATRICE, the most delightful toilet 
preparation of the age, keeps the skin in per- 
fect condition, removes all secretions and stimu- 
lates circulation. A Turkish bath for the face. 
Price, 50c. 

EXQUISITE JAVA RICE FACE POWDER, de- 
lightfully perfumed, adhesive and transparent; su- 
perior in every way; cream, naturelle, white, 50c. 
WITCH HAZEL COLD CREAM, cooling, healing, refreshing; does not 
leave the skin greasy. You will like it. Price, 35c. 

"BEAU BRUMMELL" Finder Nail Polish; instantaneous in its effect; a 
beautiful polish and a delicate pink tint to the nail; beneficial. Price, 50c. 
The above and a full line of superior Toilet and Manicure Goods manu- 
factured by ISABEL CASSIDY, 30 West Twenty-third street, New York, and 
201 Masonic Templt, Chicago, on hand here. Indorsed by the profession. 
Circulars sent on application. 

PASSPORT TO BEAUTY 

— is — 




LOLA MONTEZ CREME. 

Mrs.Nettie Harrison will remove Freckles, Pimples, 
Blackheads, Mothpatches, Sallowness, Wrinkles, Deep 
Lines. Fill out sunken cheeks, and make the old and 
wasted flesh, healthy, firm and youthful again or 
MONEY REFUNDED. 

SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 
Permanently removed by the electric needle. ASHEmEittMiiani 

FREE TREATMENT for beautifying the complexion will be given any 
one presenting this ad. at my parlors. 

MRS- NETTIE HARRISON, America's Beauty Doctor, 

26 tteary St., S. F., Cal. 

REMOVAL NOTICE. 

The (ieneral Agency of the 

TRAVELERS' INSURANCE CO. 

HAS BEEN BEMOVED TO 

KOOMS 21, 22, 23, 24, (eighth flooe.) 
MILLS BUILDING. 
City Agency, W W HASKFT T General Agent 



V.h . 8, 1894 . 



SW FRA.Nl l» MEWS II 1 II R 



21 



£&**• Ffe°Pef*T£lf 



THK situation in